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Carrie523

.10 Rule On Separation

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<_< Probably obvious answer, but ... I had a lovely cache rejected because of the 528 ft rule. Is there an easy way for me to check on distance to the nearest caches before I submit a cache for review? I don't want to waste the reviewers' time if I can check this out myself. Thanks! Second question - there's a lot of tribal land in my area, what's the best way to also make sure I don't accidentally place a cache on tribal land. I had another one rejected for that reason and was really surprised the location was tribal. Thanks all. I'm really enjoying browsing around the forum. Edited by Carrie523

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I load both my Found and Unfound caches for an area I am heading towards with the intention of placing a cache. That way I can make sure I am 528 feet away from any other cache.

 

If there is a Multi in the area, or a Puzzle cache, neither of which you have done, there is a chance you can still get caught by the Proximity rule since your cache has to be 528 feet away from any of the Multi-cache waypoints or the Puzzle cache location.

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I load all caches in my gps. Found, Unfound and temp. dissabled. The reason for the dissabled caches is because they haven't been archived yet, maybe just down for repair. As Miragee said the only unknown would be stages of a multi-cache that you have to stay away from.

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I load both my Found and Unfound caches for an area I am heading towards with the intention of placing a cache. That way I can make sure I am 528 feet away from any other cache.

 

If there is a Multi in the area, or a Puzzle cache, neither of which you have done, there is a chance you can still get caught by the Proximity rule since your cache has to be 528 feet away from any of the Multi-cache waypoints or the Puzzle cache location.

 

Forgive the basic questions, but once you've loaded in all the caches - how do you compare your prospective site with the nearest others to see if they are over 528 feet? Which view on the GPS will show that?

Thanks,

Carrie

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I don't know what type of GPS you use. But on my Garmin Legend I go to the nearest cache page, and as long as the caches are .10 away minimum I should not have a problem.

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You can ask your local reviewer what their source is for tribal land maps. You can also go the an event and meet local cachers who will know the land that is off limits---and maybe who to contact to try to get one placed on tribal land with permission (Hey, it could happen).

 

I found this source, which will give you a very rough idea. Just click on the area you are interested in and an area map pops up. Clicking again gives you a tiny bit more detail.

 

Edited to add the "r" to your--just because I am that way!

Edited by Team Neos

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I don't know what type of GPS you use. But on my Garmin Legend I go to the nearest cache page, and as long as the caches are .10 away minimum I should not have a problem.

 

Thanks - that's what I have too so I'll try that out over the weekend.

<_<

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<_< Probably obvious answer, but ... I had a lovely cache rejected because of the 528 ft rule. Is there an easy way for me to check on distance to the nearest caches before I submit a cache for review? I don't want to waste the reviewers' time if I can check this out myself. Thanks! Second question - there's a lot of tribal land in my area, what's the best way to also make sure I don't accidentally place a cache on tribal land. I had another one rejected for that reason and was really surprised the location was tribal. Thanks all. I'm really enjoying browsing around the forum.

 

1. As already mentioned, definitely do the "nearest caches" search from your account page for the area in which you hope to place a cache.

2. Find all of the caches in that area.

3. For multis, mark waypoints for each stage so that you can check those coordinates on the "Hide and Seek a Cache" page.

4. Remember that puzzle caches can affect you. Bogus coordinates for a puzzle cache don't require the separation, but the real ones do.

 

I realize finding all caches in an area can take some work, but at least it's fun work. :unsure:

 

Doing the above usually takes care of things related to the separation guideline, but there's always the possibility somebody else could be looking to hide a cache there too and submits it just before you do, so don't wait.

 

Follow the advice of Team Neos regarding appropriate location. Your reviewer and long-term local cachers usually already know, so e-mail or ask at an event.

 

(Edited for typo and to answer second question)

Edited by Teach2Learn

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You can ask you local reviewer what their source is for tribal land maps. You can also go the an event and meet local cachers who will know the land that is off limits---and maybe who to contact to try to get one placed on tribal land with permission (Hey, it could happen).

 

I found this source, which will give you a very rough idea. Just click on the area you are interested in and an area map pops up. Clicking again gives you a tiny bit more detail.

 

Thanks - haven't found any sign of local events here yet, but I'll keep an eye out.

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Thanks - haven't found any sign of local events here yet, but I'll keep an eye out.

 

A quick check showed this caching group, Yahoo Group for NM Cachers, is somewhat active. Of course, you may already be aware of it. The SW forum on this website may also help.

Edited by Teach2Learn

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<_< Probably obvious answer, but ... I had a lovely cache rejected because of the 528 ft rule. Is there an easy way for me to check on distance to the nearest caches before I submit a cache for review? I don't want to waste the reviewers' time if I can check this out myself.

 

Here's a way to do this that doesn't require Pocket Querys...

 

Fill out the cache submission form just like normal, enter all the info, including the name, coordinates, state, difficulty and terrain. No need to put anything in the Short or Long Description yet, other than perhaps 'Testing', or XXs, if you want.

 

Now, UNCHECK the box that asks:

 

Yes, this listing is active (For new listings, if you want to work on this listing before it is reviewed, uncheck this box. Reviewers will only see the listing in the queue when it is checked.)

 

Now, click on the two disclaimers at the bottom and submit the cache.

 

Lastly, on the cache page you just created, under the 'Hints' section, you'll see a series of hyperlinks like this:

 

Find...

...other caches hidden or found by this user

...nearby caches of this type, that I haven't found

...all nearby caches, that I haven't found

...all nearby waymarks on Waymarking.com

...all nearby placenames

...all nearby benchmarks

...all nearby hiking trails from Trails.com

 

Click on the 'Find all nearby caches' and you will see a listing of every cache in the immediate area, including Member's Only caches, sorted by distance in feet (if less than .1 mile) and sorted by .1 mile increments (if greater than .1 mile).

 

If the nearest cache shows up as less than 524 feet then it's too close (obviously) and your new cache will not be allowed on this site. But, if the nearest cache is .1 mile or more away, then edit the cache and CHECK the box that asks:

 

Yes, this listing is active (For new listings, if you want to work on this listing before it is reviewed, uncheck this box. Reviewers will only see the listing in the queue when it is checked.)

 

And submit the cache as usual.

 

Done.

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Here's a way to do this that doesn't require Pocket Querys...

 

...Click on the 'Find all nearby caches' and you will see a listing of every cache in the immediate area, including Member's Only caches, sorted by distance in feet (if less than .1 mile) and sorted by .1 mile increments (if greater than .1 mile).

 

If the nearest cache shows up as less than 524 feet then it's too close (obviously) and your new cache will not be allowed on this site. But, if the nearest cache is .1 mile or more away, then edit the cache and CHECK the box that asks:

 

Yes, this listing is active (For new listings, if you want to work on this listing before it is reviewed, uncheck this box. Reviewers will only see the listing in the queue when it is checked.)

 

And submit the cache as usual.

 

Done.

 

Yes, as recommended in most of this thread, the "nearest caches" search will help and your way on the submit for review page makes sense. However, it still won't account for multi stages or puzzle caches' actual waypoints. Either you have to find those and mark them or let the reviewer check for them.

 

(edited for typo)

Edited by Teach2Learn

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<_< Probably obvious answer, but ... I had a lovely cache rejected because of the 528 ft rule. Is there an easy way for me to check on distance to the nearest caches before I submit a cache for review? I don't want to waste the reviewers' time if I can check this out myself.

 

Here's a way to do this that doesn't require Pocket Querys...

 

Fill out the cache submission form just like normal, enter all the info, including the name, coordinates, state, difficulty and terrain. No need to put anything in the Short or Long Description yet, other than perhaps 'Testing', or XXs, if you want.

 

Now, UNCHECK the box that asks:

...

You could also do it by entering the coords on this page, where is says 'Search by latitude/longitude format', so you don't have to set up a cache page. However, as noted this will only show you distance to a cache's listed point. which is find for traditionals, but if there are multis or puzzles in the area, it won't show where the stags/final points are.

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For puzzles, a good rule of thumb is to solve all of them which have posted coordinates within two miles of your intended cache location. That is because the "bogus" coordinates are supposed to be no more than a mile or two away from the actual coordinates.

 

You save yourself and your reviewer some work if you first locate the multicaches and puzzles in the park where you'd like to hide your cache. :rolleyes:

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For puzzles, a good rule of thumb is to solve all of them which have posted coordinates within two miles of your intended cache location. That is because the "bogus" coordinates are supposed to be no more than a mile or two away from the actual coordinates.

 

You save yourself and your reviewer some work if you first locate the multicaches and puzzles in the park where you'd like to hide your cache. :rolleyes:

 

For the puzzle impaired this may not be an option. If there is a puzzle cache and you can't or don't want to spend the time solving, you can send your proposed coordinates to the reviewer and ask if the spot is OK.

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Right on, brainsnat! :anicute:

 

As one of the "puzzle impaired," I know how this is. I ran into the Proximity problem with one of my caches. It ended up being only 37 feet away from a puzzle cache ammo can . . . :grin:

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For puzzles, a good rule of thumb is to solve all of them which have posted coordinates within two miles of your intended cache location. That is because the "bogus" coordinates are supposed to be no more than a mile or two away from the actual coordinates.

 

 

Given your oft-stated ineptitude with puzzles, this is a pretty funny suggestion.

 

Ron/yumitori, who leaves all of the puzzles for his wife to do. Really...

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For puzzles, a good rule of thumb is to solve all of them which have posted coordinates within two miles of your intended cache location. That is because the "bogus" coordinates are supposed to be no more than a mile or two away from the actual coordinates.

 

You save yourself and your reviewer some work if you first locate the multicaches and puzzles in the park where you'd like to hide your cache. :laughing:

 

For the puzzle impaired this may not be an option. If there is a puzzle cache and you can't or don't want to spend the time solving, you can send your proposed coordinates to the reviewer and ask if the spot is OK.

 

ooooo - I'm clenching here, Briansnat.

 

I usually just do a "Find a cache" on the gc.com site's front page, using the coordinates ... but then I also usually scout a location first and/or pick a spot that is devoid of caches.

 

... but then again, I've only hidden a handful. What would I know? I'm just reading all the Briansnat stuff I can find.

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We live in a small town (almost 10,000) and one of the three caches here is a multi/puzzle/virtual. (It is a virtual - no log, but is listed as a multi-location for info to solve a puzzle) It is a tour of historical parts of the town. It also takes up about 1/3 of the main part of town and all the good interesting places...

 

So I rode my bike all over town and marked in my GPSr those points in that virtual tour, then marked points of possible locations, then used the Measure Distance feature in the mapping software. You can also load all the caches in the area, found and not found, stand in your possible location and do a GOTO, with Nearest to Position as your reference. On my GPS it will tell you how many feet/miles to your destination.

 

<edited for lack of coffee>

Edited by Zzyzx Road

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:grin: Probably obvious answer, but ... I had a lovely cache rejected because of the 528 ft rule. Is there an easy way for me to check on distance to the nearest caches before I submit a cache for review? I don't want to waste the reviewers' time if I can check this out myself. Thanks! Second question - there's a lot of tribal land in my area, what's the best way to also make sure I don't accidentally place a cache on tribal land. I had another one rejected for that reason and was really surprised the location was tribal. Thanks all. I'm really enjoying browsing around the forum.

Try Google earth >tools>measure...you will need both cache coords...lots of different ways to measure..GFI

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We live in a small town (almost 10,000) and one of the three caches here is a multi/puzzle/virtual. (It is a virtual - no log, but is listed as a multi-location for info to solve a puzzle) It is a tour of historical parts of the town. It also takes up about 1/3 of the main part of town and all the good interesting places...

 

Virtual stages of traditional caches (logbook) are afforded the .1 mile protection. But NONE of the grandfathered types (Earthcache, virtual, webcam) is subject to the saturation rule. So if that cache is a virtual, you can place caches near it, and its stages.

 

saturation This guideline applies to all stages of multicaches and mystery/puzzle caches, except for any “bogus” posted coordinates for a puzzle cache.
Do you see virtual, webcam or earthcache listed there? NOPE.

 

:grin:

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Method One. Load all local caches into your GPS then hide yours. With the caches on your GPS you can do a find nearest when you are at the cache spot. See how close the closest one is.

 

Method Two.

Load all the caches into a map. Then look at the map and know you are good before you go to hide the cache. (Most remote areas are good)

 

Method Three.

Find them all. Then you know where all the caches are without checking anything.

 

Method Four.

Do a seek a cache using the "Hide and Seek a Cache" menu based on your caches coordinate. The site will tell you what's close.

 

Method Five.

Enter the cache and uncheck the "submit cache for review" button. Then go to the cache page in it's preview mode. From there do a 'seek nearest' and the site will tell you what's close.

 

As for puzzle caches. I completely ignore them. If a waypoint is too close it's the reviewers job to tell me. I say that because this site doesnt' choose to relax the 528' rule for caches you can't know the location of. Also there is some confusion on a puzzle caches fake waypoint and if you can put a cache near the fake waypoint. Personally I use fake locations that don't make sence to avoid the problem. Center of a lake, or better still center of a Sewage lagoon. Those worked better than the center of the parking lot for the Idaho State Police. Even though it was clearly marked "STAY OUT" people got in and looked anyway. If they wade in sewage from not readin the cache page, oh well.

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Right on, brainsnat! B)

 

As one of the "puzzle impaired," I know how this is. I ran into the Proximity problem with one of my caches. It ended up being only 37 feet away from a puzzle cache ammo can . . . :D

Hmmm... When we changed reviewers some time back, evidently the final location of a puzzle wasn't passed on. A new cache was placed 75 feet from said final... That was fun, while it lasted. Of course, I was the only one who had solved the puzzle, and no one else ran across the wrong cache. :mad:

 

I understand that the reviewers can now keep notes on the cache page that aren't visible to the public. :laughing:

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