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San Diego County Cache Critters


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Okay, this is our very first post to the forums, so be gentle. <_<)

 

Hope it's okay to post a picture of a critter near a cache that we couldn't find (the Crow's Nest in Santee, #GCK144). Of course, if the cache had ears & tail, then we did find it!!

 

b0afdddf-4aaf-4430-a41f-21799257e72b.jpg

 

Laurie & Bill

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Okay, this is our very first post to the forums, so be gentle. <_<)

 

Hope it's okay to post a picture of a critter near a cache that we couldn't find (the Crow's Nest in Santee, #GCK144). Of course, if the cache had ears & tail, then we did find it!!

 

Laurie & Bill

Welcome to the Cache Critters forum. DNF Critters most definitely qualify as legitimate subjects.

-Gecko Dad

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Okay, this is our very first post to the forums, so be gentle. ;))

 

Hope it's okay to post a picture of a critter near a cache that we couldn't find (the Crow's Nest in Santee, #GCK144). Of course, if the cache had ears & tail, then we did find it!!

 

b0afdddf-4aaf-4430-a41f-21799257e72b.jpg

 

Laurie & Bill

Laurie & Bill,

 

Welcome to a SD Forum thread. You two are diving right in since the Flash-Mob event and showing signs of becoming FTF fanatics. O well, there goes your sanity.

 

Harmon

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While hiking to one of those other caches called "CLIFF," fisnjack and I happened onto this guy taking a little nap in the sun.

 

db15c239-1156-4f3b-979d-d03e428c7613.jpg

 

And then another view after he woke up and realized people were staring at him . . . :DB)

 

f8be662f-4334-4231-a17a-a8d5a561398e.jpg

 

Later, as we hiked down to "Desert Spring," a neat cache that has only been found three times since last August, we saw this guy:

 

dd358840-32d0-4f68-95a0-72bceead7b44.jpg

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While hiking to one of those other caches called "CLIFF," fisnjack and I happened onto this guy taking a little nap in the sun.

db15c239-1156-4f3b-979d-d03e428c7613.jpg

That sure looks like FisnJack. Just kidding of course.

 

Say, I thought you were resting your legs and feet. Guess it's time to activate my Horsethief Canyon sleepers.

 

The truth is that you and Fisnjack hike rings around most of us, me especially. Both of you are amazing and add so very much to our local Geocaching scene. Take good care of yourself.

Edited by SD Rowdies
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What is this strange word thou hast useth...? "Sanity"? Shall have to look that up...methinks we art too far gone...best not to fight it. Just give in to the caching lunacy...especially with the full moon rising!! :D

Point well taken, lunacy it is. Isn't the moon always "full?"

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While hiking to one of those other caches called "CLIFF," fisnjack and I happened onto this guy taking a little nap in the sun.

db15c239-1156-4f3b-979d-d03e428c7613.jpg

That sure looks like FisnJack. Just kidding of course.

 

Say, I thought you were resting your legs and feet. Guess it's time to activate my Horsethief Canyon sleepers.

 

The truth is that you and Fisnjack hike rings around most of us, me especially. Both of you are amazing and add so very much to our local Geocaching scene. Take good care of yourself.

Hey there I didn't think that one looked like me at all. I look more like the one I got a picture of near Desert Springs. I'll try and attach it. As for your sleepers in Horsethief I think TR Violin beat you to it with his 2 new ones and a Terracache just before he went into the hospital. Says they are an easy 5 1/2 mile hike along the ridge well above Pull My Fanger. Miragee rested her feet by doing the 8 mile Kiss the Bottom of Horsethief by mt bike. That made the other 5 miles much easier especially that 1 mile bushwack to Cliff. GFETE

f4db98d4-bada-4ea9-b7d3-f70278cbc75a.jpg

Edited by fisnjack
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Monday, 5/28/2007 (Memorial Day)

I was treated to the acrobatics of this handsome Banded Rock Lizard while I was out exploring in the Indian Hill area in pursuit of Terracache find #100. It was not only climbing upside down while I watched, but at one point it made leap of several feet across a high up gap between two large boulders starting from a nearly vertical perch. It looked like a bit like a flying squirrel with legs spread out wide and pumping air as it passed overhead.

-Gecko Dad

 

Banded Rock Lizard (Petrosaurus mearnsi)

9e8ae4bb-5f56-4595-9d86-7b40669875d5.jpg

 

I also spotted this pictograph that looks suspiciously like a Gecko Man. :o

91320e43-9eb6-4e8d-8a9d-19620b50dafb.jpg

 

cb616979-b31c-4c4d-832f-87a940904b0e.jpg

Edited by Team Gecko
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Monday, 5/28/2007 (Memorial Day)

I was treated to the acrobats of this handsome Banded Rock Lizard while I was out exploring in the Indian Hill area in pursuit of Terracache find #100. It was not only climbing upside down while I watched, but at one point it made leap of several feet across a high up gap between two large boulders starting from a nearly vertical perch. It looked like a bit like a flying squirrel with legs spread out wide and pumping air as it passed overhead.

-Gecko Dad

 

Banded Rock Lizard (Petrosaurus mearnsi)

9e8ae4bb-5f56-4595-9d86-7b40669875d5.jpg

 

I also spotted this pictograph that looks suspiciously like a Gecko Man. :o

91320e43-9eb6-4e8d-8a9d-19620b50dafb.jpg

 

cb616979-b31c-4c4d-832f-87a940904b0e.jpg

Hey! watch that Parkour stuff old fella.

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While hiking to one of those other caches called "CLIFF," fisnjack and I happened onto this guy taking a little nap in the sun.

db15c239-1156-4f3b-979d-d03e428c7613.jpg

That sure looks like FisnJack. Just kidding of course.

 

Say, I thought you were resting your legs and feet. Guess it's time to activate my Horsethief Canyon sleepers.

 

The truth is that you and Fisnjack hike rings around most of us, me especially. Both of you are amazing and add so very much to our local Geocaching scene. Take good care of yourself.

Hey there I didn't think that one looked like me at all. I look more like the one I got a picture of near Desert Springs. I'll try and attach it. As for your sleepers in Horsethief I think TR Violin beat you to it with his 2 new ones and a Terracache just before he went into the hospital. Says they are an easy 5 1/2 mile hike along the ridge well above Pull My Fanger. Miragee rested her feet by doing the 8 mile Kiss the Bottom of Horsethief by mt bike. That made the other 5 miles much easier especially that 1 mile bushwack to Cliff. GFETE

f4db98d4-bada-4ea9-b7d3-f70278cbc75a.jpg

 

You and Miragee are too much and that danged T.R. has worn my boots out many times before. Karen is keeping me informed about Mike's situation and I may give that old rascal a visit tommorrow. I called him just now and he said "So far things look good."

 

Hey Gecko Dad, we're off topic aren't we? .... as usual, but then, Mike's an animal so maybe not off topic.

Edited by SD Rowdies
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Well, this wasn't in San Diego...but I haven't posted here in a while!

 

While heading through the top of Texas on our way to Carlsbad Caverns, I stopped for a short jaunt up a hill on a mountain pass. The cicadas were so noisy, it was unbelievable. This guy was making so much noise!

 

da317e68-61c5-43ee-96bb-fd8ea4a8d7d4.jpg

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Well, this wasn't in San Diego...but I haven't posted here in a while!

 

While heading through the top of Texas on our way to Carlsbad Caverns, I stopped for a short jaunt up a hill on a mountain pass. The cicadas were so noisy, it was unbelievable. This guy was making so much noise!

 

da317e68-61c5-43ee-96bb-fd8ea4a8d7d4.jpg

Locusts are one of the big diversions for pre-teen Texans. We caught 'em and tied a long thread to them to have a flying pet, you know, like a dog on a leash except for flight. If that ain't cruel to dogs then it sure ain't cruel to locusts, at least we would let them go. Anyway, that's one of the two ways that little Texans of old learned to climb trees so well. Now it's all PlayStation, xBox, iPods, and TV. ... and, yes, Texas kids called them "locust" (low-cuss.)

Edited by SD Rowdies
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d7de0d6d-5cea-4d88-b4e0-533b5c6e9b40.jpg

 

3e2d34e2-f1dd-4908-a2ce-6c41e128ec16.jpg

 

I'm no Miragee or Gecko Dad, but here are a couple of pictures of a snake I came across leaving a cache. Gecko Dad, what is it? I think it was about 4 1/2 feet long.

J&J-

Thanks for sharing. This is a Gopher Snake (Pituophis melanoleucus). They are fairly common in San Diego neighborhoods bordering open spaces.

 

My copy of Stebbins' Western Reptiles and Amphibians indicates they can reach 110 inches (over 9 feet long) but I've never seen one much more than 6 feet. Kingsnakes (Lampropeltis getulus) are dark brown or black alternating with yellowish or white bands. Common Kingsnakes are generally smaller than Gopher Snakes but can reach nearly 7 feet. The mountain variety (Lampropeltis zonata) is much smaller and very colorful with the inclusion of red bands in the pattern (red-black-yellow-black-red-black- ...). Both species are constrictors.

-GD

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d7de0d6d-5cea-4d88-b4e0-533b5c6e9b40.jpg

 

3e2d34e2-f1dd-4908-a2ce-6c41e128ec16.jpg

 

I'm no Miragee or Gecko Dad, but here are a couple of pictures of a snake I came across leaving a cache. Gecko Dad, what is it? I think it was about 4 1/2 feet long.

J&J-

Thanks for sharing. This is a Gopher Snake (Pituophis melanoleucus). They are fairly common in San Diego neighborhoods bordering open spaces.

 

My copy of Stebbins' Western Reptiles and Amphibians indicates they can reach 110 inches (over 9 feet long) but I've never seen one much more than 6 feet. Kingsnakes (Lampropeltis getulus) are dark brown or black alternating with yellowish or white bands. Common Kingsnakes are generally smaller than Gopher Snakes but can reach nearly 7 feet. The mountain variety (Lampropeltis zonata) is much smaller and very colorful with the inclusion of red bands in the pattern (red-black-yellow-black-red-black- ...). Both species are constrictors.

-GD

Hey! what about my fourteen footer?

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Locusts are one of the big diversions for pre-teen Texans. We caught 'em and tied a long thread to them to have a flying pet, you know, like a dog on a leash except for flight. If that ain't cruel to dogs then it sure ain't cruel to locusts, at least we would let them go. Anyway, that's one of the two ways that little Texans of old learned to climb trees so well. Now it's all PlayStation, xBox, iPods, and TV. ... and, yes, Texas kids called them "locust" (low-cuss.)

 

Thanks for the ID Harmon...I thought they were cicadas!

 

Does anyone know what this is? We found it by a cache in New Mexico. The log showed we were the first visitors since November, so I think this little guy got spooked from his nest. It's eyes weren't even open yet. It kept making a loud chirping noise that was answered by another one under the tree. We moved the one out in the open back under the tree next to the other one, and they got quiet again.

 

a166afe4-8713-4b4b-b16d-37a0c566678a.jpg

 

f1347816-3850-4220-8153-9317d0a8508f.jpg

Edited by Cornerstone4
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Locusts are one of the big diversions for pre-teen Texans. We caught 'em and tied a long thread to them to have a flying pet, you know, like a dog on a leash except for flight. If that ain't cruel to dogs then it sure ain't cruel to locusts, at least we would let them go. Anyway, that's one of the two ways that little Texans of old learned to climb trees so well. Now it's all PlayStation, xBox, iPods, and TV. ... and, yes, Texas kids called them "locust" (low-cuss.)

 

Thanks for the ID Harmon...I thought they were cicadas!

 

Does anyone know what this is? We found it by a cache in New Mexico. The log showed we were the first visitors since November, so I think this little guy got spooked from his nest. It's eyes weren't even open yet. It kept making a loud chirping noise that was answered by another one under the tree. We moved the one out in the open back under the tree next to the other one, and they got quiet again.

 

a166afe4-8713-4b4b-b16d-37a0c566678a.jpg

 

f1347816-3850-4220-8153-9317d0a8508f.jpg

Looks like a kangaroo rat to me...

 

As for those insecty things, when I was growing up in New Mexico, we called them "cicadas". Some years there were so many of them that the buzzing could drive you insane. What we called "locusts" were things that looked like giant grasshoppers. Back then, both could be eaten on a dare...

 

For what it is worth, this is what Wikipedia says: "Cicadas are sometimes called "locusts", although they are unrelated to true locusts, which are a kind of grasshopper." (And we all know that Wikipedia is never wrong. ;) )

Edited by Let's Look Over Thayer
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Locusts are one of the big diversions for pre-teen Texans. We caught 'em and tied a long thread to them to have a flying pet, you know, like a dog on a leash except for flight. If that ain't cruel to dogs then it sure ain't cruel to locusts, at least we would let them go. Anyway, that's one of the two ways that little Texans of old learned to climb trees so well. Now it's all PlayStation, xBox, iPods, and TV. ... and, yes, Texas kids called them "locust" (low-cuss.)

 

Thanks for the ID Harmon...I thought they were cicadas!

 

Does anyone know what this is? We found it by a cache in New Mexico. The log showed we were the first visitors since November, so I think this little guy got spooked from his nest. It's eyes weren't even open yet. It kept making a loud chirping noise that was answered by another one under the tree. We moved the one out in the open back under the tree next to the other one, and they got quiet again.

 

a166afe4-8713-4b4b-b16d-37a0c566678a.jpg

 

f1347816-3850-4220-8153-9317d0a8508f.jpg

Looks like a kangaroo rat to me...

 

As for those insecty things, when I was growing up in New Mexico, we called them "cicadas". Some years there were so many of them that the buzzing could drive you insane. What we called "locusts" were things that looked like giant grasshoppers. Back then, both could be eaten on a dare...

 

For what it is worth, this is what Wikipedia says: "Cicadas are sometimes called "locusts", although they are unrelated to true locusts, which are a kind of grasshopper." (And we all know that Wikipedia is never wrong. :D )

The deal is that one tends to call things what parents and grandparents called them. A pigeon is a Rock Dove but just try to get everybody to call them that.

 

Anyway, those are great shots of the Kangaroo Rat. I also took special interest in the athletic sock thinking that it might be a case for the San Diego County Unbunched Sock Police. Y' can't be too careful.

Edited by SD Rowdies
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Does anyone know what this is? We found it by a cache in New Mexico. The log showed we were the first visitors since November, so I think this little guy got spooked from his nest. It's eyes weren't even open yet. It kept making a loud chirping noise that was answered by another one under the tree. We moved the one out in the open back under the tree next to the other one, and they got quiet again.

 

f1347816-3850-4220-8153-9317d0a8508f.jpg

I agree with Harmon that this looks like a Kangaroo Rat (genus Dipodomys). There are 13 different species in California in a surprising range of sizes from 180 grams (Giant) down to 50 grams (Merriams). Your photo suggests this is a very large type given this is a baby.

 

Here is a baby Merriam's I discovered back in May 2003 at the base of the lower fall at First Grove in Borrego Palm Canyon before the big flood wiped out most of First Grove. It was spotted just before I climbed up and around the fall to reach Oasis Waterfall. This youngster's body was less than two inches long.

-GD

 

1467843_200.jpg

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I'm no Miragee or Gecko Dad, but here are a couple of pictures of a snake I came across leaving a cache. Gecko Dad, what is it? I think it was about 4 1/2 feet long.

J&J-

Thanks for sharing. This is a Gopher Snake (Pituophis melanoleucus). They are fairly common in San Diego neighborhoods bordering open spaces.

 

My copy of Stebbins' Western Reptiles and Amphibians indicates they can reach 110 inches (over 9 feet long) but I've never seen one much more than 6 feet. Kingsnakes (Lampropeltis getulus) are dark brown or black alternating with yellowish or white bands. Common Kingsnakes are generally smaller than Gopher Snakes but can reach nearly 7 feet. The mountain variety (Lampropeltis zonata) is much smaller and very colorful with the inclusion of red bands in the pattern (red-black-yellow-black-red-black- ...). Both species are constrictors.

-GD

 

Thank you for the identification! Note that i saw this in Nevada, just outside of Reno.

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A pigeon is a Rock Dove but just try to get everybody to call them that.

The interesting thing here is that "pigeon" and "dove" both refer to the same family of birds (Columbidae). Dove comes from the same root as "taube" which is the German word for dove/pigeon, whereas pigeon is the French word for dove/pigeon.

 

All of which reminds me of a very interesting artifact of the English language. Following the Norman Invasion in 1066, the English nobility, by and large, spoke Old French whereas the peasants spoke Old English (which derived from Germanic languages.) The words we have for food animals (Cow, Calf, Swine/Pig, Chicken, etc.) come from the Germanic word for the animal. The words we have for the food that comes from these animals (Beef, Veal, Pork, Poultry, etc.) come from the Old French word for the animal.

 

The deal is that one tends to call things what parents and grandparents called them.

It all depended on who was doing the preparing and who was doing the eating! :rolleyes:

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Locusts are one of the big diversions for pre-teen Texans. We caught 'em and tied a long thread to them to have a flying pet, you know, like a dog on a leash except for flight. If that ain't cruel to dogs then it sure ain't cruel to locusts, at least we would let them go. Anyway, that's one of the two ways that little Texans of old learned to climb trees so well. Now it's all PlayStation, xBox, iPods, and TV. ... and, yes, Texas kids called them "locust" (low-cuss.)

 

Thanks for the ID Harmon...I thought they were cicadas!

 

Does anyone know what this is? We found it by a cache in New Mexico. The log showed we were the first visitors since November, so I think this little guy got spooked from his nest. It's eyes weren't even open yet. It kept making a loud chirping noise that was answered by another one under the tree. We moved the one out in the open back under the tree next to the other one, and they got quiet again.

 

a166afe4-8713-4b4b-b16d-37a0c566678a.jpg

 

f1347816-3850-4220-8153-9317d0a8508f.jpg

Looks like a kangaroo rat to me...

 

As for those insecty things, when I was growing up in New Mexico, we called them "cicadas". Some years there were so many of them that the buzzing could drive you insane. What we called "locusts" were things that looked like giant grasshoppers. Back then, both could be eaten on a dare...

 

For what it is worth, this is what Wikipedia says: "Cicadas are sometimes called "locusts", although they are unrelated to true locusts, which are a kind of grasshopper." (And we all know that Wikipedia is never wrong. :lol: )

The deal is that one tends to call things what parents and grandparents called them. A pigeon is a Rock Dove but just try to get everybody to call them that.

 

Anyway, those are great shots of the Kangaroo Rat. I also took special interest in the athletic sock thinking that it might be a case for the San Diego County Unbunched Sock Police. Y' can't be too careful.

 

I always thought they were flying rats B)B):smile::lol::D:smile:

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Sunday, 6/3/2007

McCain Valley Bear sighted from Can You See the Bear?.

-GD

 

Ursa mccaini :unsure:

c3928b50-b7f5-4541-acc9-551f62c041fd.jpg

 

I'm usually pretty good at seeing these, but not this time. Can you point it out?

Yep, kind of hard to spot due to effective camo. 10 feet tall. You can count on it being here rain or shine.

-GD

a7857725-9bb0-45dd-ba6d-7b325ffb8b89.jpg

That looks Photoshopped to me!

Edited by FlagMan
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I *think* I can see it...!! Rock bears and polar bears and teddy bears - oh my!! (No bears were harmed while not photoshopping this post...)

 

45b2605a-a93a-4256-b9f9-355b267bee47.jpg

Love it, a 'shoppers attack. I just knew this would happen without my help.

 

Actually the original looks like a bear on back of a sleeping dawg.

Edited by SD Rowdies
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This smallish raptor was flying around our yard this evening checking the trees for birds nests. I'm not sure what it was, so I was hoping for some ID help.

 

The picture is bad, since it was getting pretty dark...but I'll send Harmon some untouched pics to see if he can pull some better images out.

 

Raptor-002.jpg

 

Edit to add...size wise, much bigger than a Kestrel, and didn't have the coloring of a Kestrel, and about half the size of the Red Tails that live in the neighborhood. As far as the Audubon ID guide I have, the closest I could come was a Peregrin Falcon...but I wasn't sure if we had those.

Edited by Cornerstone4
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This smallish raptor was flying around our yard this evening checking the trees for birds nests. I'm not sure what it was, so I was hoping for some ID help.

 

The picture is bad, since it was getting pretty dark...but I'll send Harmon some untouched pics to see if he can pull some better images out.

 

Raptor-002.jpg

 

Edit to add...size wise, much bigger than a Kestrel, and didn't have the coloring of a Kestrel, and about half the size of the Red Tails that live in the neighborhood. As far as the Audubon ID guide I have, the closest I could come was a Peregrin Falcon...but I wasn't sure if we had those.

My initial guess Prairie Falcon or possibly Merlin. I've seen Merlins (Falco columbarius) fairly regularly around our neighborhood here in Scripps Ranch. In fact one may have nabbed some or our latest crop of Phoebes. It was flapping back and forth from the ground to our backyard fence the day after four baby Phoebes fledged last week. They resemble Kestrals although a Prairie variant of F. columbarius is light like your photo shows.

 

The light coloration around the neck and in the leg area is what I am going on. Prairie Falcons (Falco mexicanus) are a year-round resident and better match the description "much bigger than a Kestral". Adult PFs have 16" body and 40" wingspan vs 10"/24" for Merlins. Peregrines (Falco peregrinus) are the same size as Praries Falcons but have darker, barred feathering in the leg area.

-GD

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Thanks Don!

 

I was just getting dressed and heard a couple of jays making a big ruckus out back. I also heard the unique sound the raptor was making last night. I don't know how to describe it...it is kind of a pewling call, for lack of a better description, since it has a musical quality. Unlike the caw of a crow, or the long call of our resident red-tails.

 

Anyway, I looked out the window, and the nests in our pepper tree out back were being raided. I ran down stairs and got the camera, but when I got outside, it took off with the jays, and all of the other birds in hot pursuit.

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Thanks Don!

 

I was just getting dressed and heard a couple of jays making a big ruckus out back. I also heard the unique sound the raptor was making last night. I don't know how to describe it...it is kind of a pewling call, for lack of a better description, since it has a musical quality. Unlike the caw of a crow, or the long call of our resident red-tails.

 

Anyway, I looked out the window, and the nests in our pepper tree out back were being raided. I ran down stairs and got the camera, but when I got outside, it took off with the jays, and all of the other birds in hot pursuit.

If you can manage to get a look at it flying or even a sideways view, we might have more basis for an identification. I also thought of Harrier (Circus cyaneus) or Cooper's Hawk (Accipiter cooperii) given the size. We see more Harriers (used to be called Marsh Hawk) than any other raptor in our neighborhood, often perched on light poles. They are stockier than a falcon, though and a little larger. Cooper's Hawks are accipiters, rather than falcons, and have a longish narrow tail and reddish tint to upper breast. They also have a distinctive red eye.

 

Looking forward to seeing additional photos.

-Don

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