Jump to content

What Makes A Good Multi?


Followers 1

Recommended Posts

We are thinking of setting up a find clues multi cache at a nearby site. We have done one multi where you gathered numbers added them up and got co-ordinates.

I have examined other clue multi's on the web site and was wondering what everyone thinks makes a good multi ? is it lots of clues, numbers to find, counting things etc. Let me know you ideas and we will try to include them :tongue:

Link to comment

There are two ways you can go. Easy stage clues or co-ordinates hidden in interesting places. Otherwise, tough clues or puzzels which give a good sence of satisfaction when solved. Maybe a bit of both. Check out the "enigma series" or "quantum leap" caches good examples of fine puzzels. The "pooh sticks " multi is a great example of simple easy to find clues taking you round a wonderful river walk. (Beer & Buns at the end does sound good though) :tongue:

Link to comment

Multi-caches with historical content are some of our favourites! We've found many caches with lush scenery and interesting places to be equally enjoyable.

 

The best thing I can suggest is what was said to us when we thought of ideas for our first cache (though we've only put two out at the moment) and that is to make a cache that you would enjoy doing and work from there. After all a cache is a personal thing a bit like moustaches....erm... some people have handle bar moustaches, some waxed pointy moustaches...er.. ok.. so its nothing like moustaches but you get the idea!

 

House Of Boo

Link to comment

Whatever you do check what you've set before going live. If your multi can be short-cut then it's rather pointless. Here's a few examples:

 

1. A regular was turned into a multi because the owner wanted cachers to park in a specific place and enjoy the walk/scenery on the way to it but was unhappy that cachers were parking closer to the cache therefore avoiding the walk. They placed a micro near to they're proposed parking point. It is possible to find the micro, plot the final cache position on a map then get back into the car and drive to it.

 

2. This multi required visiting two locations to get info to fill in the final co-ords. At the first point enough info was gained that left only the final digit of the co-ords. Given a range of 0 to 9 (opt for 5) and an additional hint about the cache being close to a fence it isn't rocket science to narrow down the search area for the cache without visiting the second location.

 

3. A four stage multi leading to the final cache. A spoiler photo gave away the position of the fourth item which contained all the information for the final cache. By going direct to the fourth location it is possible to bypass the first three stages.

 

All the above caches are in worthwhile locations but the aim/theme of the cache is compromised for the above reasons. If you place an emphasis on fun (a good theme such as in GCJFCW "The Holy Grail") and something the whole family can get involved in I'm sure you'll find it will become a popular cache. Don't forget, you're also trying to attract these "numbers cachers" away from the quicker regular caches!

 

Good luck!

Link to comment

When I set my historical multi (Up the Close and Down the Stair), I had a couple of people "playtest" it before posting it. Just gave them the printout of the description (coordinates and explanation) and let them try it out. I followed behind and kept my mouth shut - just watched what they did.

 

Then took them to the pub and bought a round. In vino veritas - they gave me good feedback. I discovered a better location for one of my stages by watching them, and refined my descriptions based on their reactions.

 

I think the cache was better for having done so.

Link to comment

Ok, here goes:

 

1: It's listed as a multi! (ok, so its my pet peeve, and most of the ones I was moaning about have now been changed to reflect their status since I posted my moan, so full marks to those cachers :lol: )

 

2: As Pyoung1s said, shortcuts don't make a good multi, although they are kinda handy for those number crunchers (can't imagine who he means ;) )

 

3: Some kinda theme, although this usually makes it a puzzle cache (The Little Cemetary Safari)

 

4: If it's a long one, multiple loggable stages (by long I mean an all day cache)

 

5: A good estimate of time to complete on the listing page, prefferably in the short description.

 

6: Consideration for lesser able cachers to be able to complete albeit in a longer time.

 

7: Good maintenance of the stages and a contingency plan in case a stage is out of order.

Link to comment

I cannot stand a multi that makes me drive anywhere else. If the area isn't interesting enough on it's own, pick a different one or just place a regular cache there.

I don't mind walking 3 miles into the woods to find a cache either, just don't make sure you leave a time estimate. It hasn't happened to me, but if I'm trying to do a cache in the evening on a workday, I don't want to find out after I get to the location that I should have started that morning.

Link to comment

There is some really good advice here, however I have found that it doesn't matter what you do, some people will like it and some others won't. I done a regular cache just the other day which I thought was in a nice and peacefull place. So I gave it a good write up. The next person to come along hated it that much that they said it was a waste of time and didn't even open it. Which I thought was cruel as it was the persons first cache. So I say do what you think you would enjoy, and work from there, because unless it is totally fantastic you won't please everybody.

Link to comment

I reckon a good multi is one that has an interesting background to it, and is based around a theme. Take Team Paradise's Aircraft Avenue cache. It has an interesting, historical theme and combines that into getting clues for the actual cache. Water Lily Lake Loop (also by Team Paradise), also has a historical side to it, and it also offers great scenery.

 

I'm sorry if this sounds like I want to make people visit the caches, but they are brilliant caches.

Link to comment
There is some really good advice here, however I have found that it doesn't matter what you do, some people will like it and some others won't. I done a regular cache just the other day which I thought was in a nice and peacefull place. So I gave it a good write up. The next person to come along hated it that much that they said it was a waste of time and didn't even open it. Which I thought was cruel as it was the persons first cache. So I say do what you think you would enjoy, and work from there, because unless it is totally fantastic you won't please everybody.

Hmmmm,

 

Just had a look at that log. I think that the general consensus was with your opinion. (Snip, I'll keep the rest of my opinion to myself)

Link to comment
Haggis Hunter wrote:

I gave it a good write up. The next person to come along hated it that much that they said it was a waste of time and didn't even open it.

If they didn't open it then they didn't sign the log, so it doesn't count as a find. The cache owner is entitled to delete their log.

Link to comment
QUOTE 

Haggis Hunter wrote:

I gave it a good write up. The next person to come along hated it that much that they said it was a waste of time and didn't even open it.

 

If they didn't open it then they didn't sign the log, so it doesn't count as a find. The cache owner is entitled to delete their log.

 

I agree.......they should delete it.

Link to comment

Having read that log, I agree.

 

Although, I have left a cache a couple of times without signing the log, it's been because I either didn't bring a pen or the one I brought packed up. From that, you can see that they're micros without a pen.

 

It would appear in this case however, the log wasn't signed out of spite, and the comments were quite harsh too. I also note that 2 days later there is a maintenance note from the owner who found the cache out of it's hiding place.

 

Hmmm, how do I say this without sounding elitist, (something I really don't like), "the person who made those harsh comments isn't exactly up there with Seasider".

 

Back to the topic though,

 

I note some have said they don't like multis's that make them drive, how about serial/chain caches, where you get to log a find for everytime you have to get back in the car?

Link to comment

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
Followers 1
×
×
  • Create New...