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Are there requirements for hiding caches?


AbbyTC
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Are there any requirements for hiding caches?  Like you need to have found at least 100 caches of all types, been a cacher for so many months....... I have come across caches that have been hidden by newbies where the coords are really off or the terrain rating difficulty rating was off.. I find it frustrating when a new cache is put out and the person placing it really has no idea how the whole thing works.  

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No, there are no experience requirements in order to hide a geocache - just a recommendation to gain some experience before hiding.  Otherwise, how would the first geocaches in a new area ever get placed?

 

Of course, a "newbie" must meet all the Geocache Hiding Guidelines, and their cache submissions must go through the review process.  As a Reviewer, I help new geocachers every day by spotting things like inaccurate coordinates.  Today I had a cache submission that wasn't even in the correct county! 

 

If you're frustrated, consider a healthy and positive outlet for that frustration.  You could reach out politely to the new cache owner and offer to help them with things like coordinate accuracy, D/T ratings, quality containers, etc.

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1 hour ago, Keystone said:

If you're frustrated, consider a healthy and positive outlet for that frustration.  You could reach out politely to the new cache owner and offer to help them with things like coordinate accuracy, D/T ratings, quality containers, etc.

And hopefully they will be receptive. I remember one new cacher who placed over twenty new caches. They were nice caches; good sized small caches full of trinkets. Most of their coordinates were off twenty metres or so, so one cacher was politely giving the corrected coordinates. The newby got insulted and archived all their caches.

 

I've also seen other new cachers who ignore all advice and get huffy and rude. Mind you, they tend not to last in the game. Those who politely take the advice have a better chance of staying in the game.

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8 hours ago, AbbyTC said:

Are there any requirements for hiding caches?  Like you need to have found at least 100 caches of all types, been a cacher for so many months

 

When I became ensnared in this wonderful obsession back in 2013, it took me almost a year to reach 100 finds, made up of 86 traditionals, 9 mysteries, 4 multis and 1 earthcache. During that time I'd placed two caches, a traditional and a multi, both of which I've since archived but not because there was anything wrong with them, rather they succumbed to natural calamities (one had a tree fall right on top of its hiding place and the other was washed away in huge seas). I hid my third cache a couple of weeks after passing that 100 find milestone, which I archived about a year ago when it was finally muggled, but my fourth hide, a 2/2.5 traditional published in March 2014 (GC4ZQTF), is still active today with 91 finds, 15 FPs and no NM logs. It's still the original container with its original logbook and the only maintenance I've had to do in the intervening seven and a half years is replace a missing pencil. This photo was taken today:

 

20210822_144011.jpg.915ade0c81648b0f78ad796542ad7359.jpg

 

I was lucky, though, as back then there were a lot more caches to find around here than there are now, so for a newcomer starting off today, it'd likely take them a lot longer than a year to get to 100 or they'd have to do a lot of travelling outside this region. So far this year I've found 63 caches, most of which have been more than 50km from home. In my local area there have only been 5 new caches hidden this year, 3 of them mine:

 

2021caches.jpg.13ebc4d61f9293b169c98a1aa0198907.jpg

 

The last thing places like this need is more restrictions on people hiding caches. Newbie caches with rubbery coordinates are better than no caches at all.

Edited by barefootjeff
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6 hours ago, barefootjeff said:

 Newbie caches with rubbery coordinates are better than no caches at all.

Yes! I love new cachers placing caches, even though I have started caching not even a year ago. There is one rule you have to know before hiding. Caches cannot be less than 528 feet (.1 mile) away from each other. This rule is automatically done online, so you need to know it. You should also complete the hider’s quiz (https://www.geocaching.com/blog/2014/12/can-you-pass-the-geocache-hiders-quiz/) before you start the hiding process. Welcome to geocaching, by the way!

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19 hours ago, AbbyTC said:

Are there any requirements for hiding caches?  Like you need to have found at least 100 caches of all types, been a cacher for so many months....... I have come across caches that have been hidden by newbies where the coords are really off or the terrain rating difficulty rating was off.

I find it frustrating when a new cache is put out and the person placing it really has no idea how the whole thing works.  

 

Lead by example.  :)    

Put a few out yourself, with spot-on coordinates, and quality containers.

If these "newbies" find more than pill bottles placed "wherever", they may have a better idea of what kinda hider they'd like to be .

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9 minutes ago, LoIQ said:

I can't tell you how many times, and trust me they're numerous, that I have searched for caches placed by newbies that just simply aren't there.

"Well we haven't actually placed it yet. I hope you'll come back to find it after we do."

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1 hour ago, LoIQ said:
On 8/22/2021 at 3:07 PM, barefootjeff said:

 

Newbie caches with rubbery coordinates are better than no caches at all.

 

I disagree with this and actually quite vehemently.   

 

I can't tell you how many times, and trust me they're numerous, that I have searched for caches placed by newbies that just simply aren't there.  Geocaching is no different than any other hobby in that it ensnares and excites, but often that excitement fades, and in some cases fades quickly.  Cachers are human.  They lose interest in things.

 

You must live in a place where there are always plenty of caches to find. I don't, I've only just ended a 104-day slump because the COVID lock-down here restricted recreation to one's own local government area and, apart from a few D5 puzzles I can't solve and T4.5 caches I can't reach, going caching simply wasn't an option for me. For the last few years, most of my caching has involved at least 50km travel from home, either north to Lake Macquarie and Newcastle or south to Sydney, and so far this year there have been just ten new caches hidden in my region (the New South Wales Central Coast, Australia) but three of those were mine. Only one of those ten was by a newbie, someone who joined in late 2020, and yes, his initial hide had some coordinate problems but they accepted the offered help and the cache is now good and doing well with 27 finds to date, far more finds than any of my 2021 caches have received (9, 10 and 12).

 

Requiring someone to find 100 caches before hiding any might be easy for someone living in a cache-dense area but most of the world outside North America and Europe isn't like that. It took me almost a year to make my 100th find and back then there were a lot more caches around here than there are now. By then I'd hidden three caches, all of which had accurate coordinates, were well received by the community and provided valuable lessons for my hides that followed. Many of those lessons you only get from hiding caches, not finding them.

 

My first hide, which I placed after making 20 finds (mostly traditionals but a good variety of sizes and D/T ratings), was a Sistema container hidden in a bushland reserve near home:

 

GC4CAXV.jpg.b4da92b29a1a7fdc01ff44c611cac1a1.jpg

 

Apart from being only terrain 1.5 in a rather mundane location, it's not all that much different to my most recent hides. It had 53 finds in eighteen months before I archived it after a tree fell right on top of its hiding place (yes, I did manage to retrieve it). It had no DNFs, NMs or NAs and everyone seemed to enjoy it, even the ones who came at it from the wrong side of the creek. That cache wasn't anything special, as evidenced by it not getting any FPs, but it's probably typical of most newbie hides around here. And yes, I'd still rather caches like this one than no caches at all.

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33 minutes ago, barefootjeff said:

Only one of those ten was by a newbie, someone who joined in late 2020, and yes, his initial hide had some coordinate problems but they accepted the offered help and the cache is now good and doing well with 27 finds to date

I'm pleased they took advice, but I've known some beginners who don't take advice. A beginner with five finds, telling me they know better than me and they are right (their coordinates were way off) and I am wrong. After about three months they were never heard from again, and their cache was archived, because people couldn't find it.

 

A beginner who placed very nice caches full of trinkets. Kids would have loved them. However, almost all of the 20 to 30 caches they placed had coordinates out by 12 plus metres. Another, more experienced cacher politely and helpfully gave them the correct coordinates in his logs. The beginner took umbrage, and archived the lot. Likely they left the caches as litter too.

 

Two caches placed by a beginner with no finds. Both coordinates out, and the one I could find, had a container that was very unsuitable. Archived after a short time. One was never found by anyone. I searched. Goodness knows how far out its coordinates were.

 

Another beginner with coordinates out 400 metres. They disagreed with me about that.

 

Even if there was no limit needed on finds, perhaps a limit of one cache published and say no more allowed for three months for the beginner cacher. There should always be allowed exceptions.

Edited by Goldenwattle
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16 minutes ago, Goldenwattle said:

I'm pleased they took advice, but I've known some beginners who don't take advice. A beginner with five finds, telling me they know better than me and they are right (their coordinates were way off) and I am wrong. After about three months they were never heard from again, and their cache was archived, because people couldn't find it.

 

A beginner who placed very nice caches full of trinkets. Kids would have loved them. However, almost all of the 20 to 30 caches they placed had coordinates out by 12 plus metres. Another, more experienced cacher politely and helpfully gave them the correct coordinates in his logs. The beginner took umbrage, and archived the lot. Likely they left the caches as litter too.

 

Two caches placed by a beginner with no finds. Both coordinates out, and the one I could find, had a container that was very unsuitable. Archived after a short time. One was never found by anyone. I searched. Goodness knows how far out its coordinates were.

 

Another beginner with coordinates out 400 metres. They disagreed with me about that.

 

Even if there was no limit needed on finds, perhaps a limit of one cache published and say no more allowed for three months for the beginner cacher. There should always be allowed exceptions.

I like that suggestion!

We found one micro by a new geocacher 11.7 mi from the posted coordinates (FTF).

The cache owner was very nice but kept insisting the map was correct when I begged her to please look at the map!! Since she insisted the map view was correct we drove there anyways and of course it's private property with no trespassing. We gave up and went caching in the area. Just before it turned dark we happened to pass a historical marker with the exact same name as the geocache and suspected it was nearby. We did locate it and sent the cache owner the correct coordinates. So frustrating. I never could understand why the CO insisted the map on the cache page showed the correct location. 

 

 

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13 minutes ago, Max and 99 said:

I like that suggestion!

We found one micro by a new geocacher 11.7 mi from the posted coordinates (FTF).

The cache owner was very nice but kept insisting the map was correct when I begged her to please look at the map!! Since she insisted the map view was correct we drove there anyways and of course it's private property with no trespassing. We gave up and went caching in the area. Just before it turned dark we happened to pass a historical marker with the exact same name as the geocache and suspected it was nearby. We did locate it and sent the cache owner the correct coordinates. So frustrating. I never could understand why the CO insisted the map on the cache page showed the correct location. 

 

 

It's called pride and low self worth and seeing assistance as a personal attack on them. The more intelligent and adaptable will likely take advice. I'm guessing they might last in the game longer too, having better interaction with others.

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12 hours ago, Max and 99 said:

We found one micro by a new geocacher 11.7 mi from the posted coordinates (FTF).

 

Mine was around 200 miles. Noticed the area in "newest" in the profile/"dashboard", a favorite fishing creek nearby, and clicked on it.

The CO used the wrong North, which put it on the other side of the state.  First and last to find, as it was on NPS property to boot.   :)

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14 hours ago, Goldenwattle said:

I'm pleased they took advice, but I've known some beginners who don't take advice. A beginner with five finds, telling me they know better than me and they are right (their coordinates were way off) and I am wrong. After about three months they were never heard from again, and their cache was archived, because people couldn't find it.

Yep, problem solved. That's why I'm not worried about this example.

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21 hours ago, Goldenwattle said:

A beginner who placed very nice caches full of trinkets. Kids would have loved them. However, almost all of the 20 to 30 caches they placed had coordinates out by 12 plus metres.

 

What would help enormously, I'm sure, would be if HQ added a "Take Coordinates" function to the app that:

  • Took multiple readings and averaged them over a minute or more (I'd like to say ten minutes or more but I'm not sure the average cacher's patience would last that long)
  • Used only GPS instead of whatever mixture of GPS, cell tower triangulation and wifi the phone wants to use. I've found the latter mix to often be wildly inaccurate.

The present recommended method of just taking a spot reading by adding a waypoint to an existing cache leaves much to be desired, both in user-friendliness and accuracy.

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On 10/10/2021 at 8:40 PM, LoIQ said:

When newbies rush out and hide caches, without a minimum amount of experience in getting good coordinates, knowing what hide types are possible, etc., it isn't just a problem with bad coordinates,  it becomes a problem of abandoned caches.

 

There are actually two different issues at play here.  Bad coordinates don't necessarily lead to abandonment of a cache.  I've found caches with bad coordinates that haven't been abandoned, I've found abandoned caches with good coordinates, and I've also found caches with bad coordinates that have been abandoned.  One does not beget the other.

 

On 10/10/2021 at 8:40 PM, LoIQ said:

Requiring new cachers to have a minimum number of finds - for purposes of conversation, let's say 100, but the minimum number is debatable - would go a long way to make sure the hider is going to stick with the hobby and maintain their caches. 

 

And if they find 100 caches along the ET trail, do you believe that to be "proof" that they're now qualfied and experienced enough to be a responsible hider and maintainer of caches?  This idea has been discussed multiple times here.  Finding X number of caches does not help determine whether or not a CO will be a good maintainer of their caches, once placed.  For the most part, that effort needed to maintain is either not in their nature or already inherent within them.  The advent of the smart phone, and their relatively easy availability (now), helped eliminate one of the main things that helped promote longevity - the purchase of a GPS unit.  Even the less expensive ones weren't really "cheap", which meant that it was a substantial enough investment that typically promoted a longer presence within geocaching (not always, but certainly more often than not).  Smart phones have made geocaching, to some extent, a "disposable" activity that doesn't cost new cachers anything to join, nor to quit.  That doesn't mean that I'm anti-phone caching.  Far from it, as I use my phone for my regular caching and my GPS (and phone) for my vacation caching.  It just seems to promote less cacher retention due to its nature.  It also means that it's more accessible to many more people, due to its nature.

 

On 10/10/2021 at 8:40 PM, LoIQ said:

The abandonment problem is huge with new cachers who find a few, hide a few, and then drop away leaving their unmaintained caches for someone else to clean up both in the environment, and on the site.

 

I agree with you about this, but isn't that part of what the caching community is supposed to do?  While it would be great if every CO took proper responsibility for maintaining/archiving/retrieving their caches, this has been going on since caching started in 2000.  Some of those early cachers lasted just as long as some of these newer cachers and they abandoned their caches as well.  It's always been incumbent upon cachers to file the appropriate NM and NA logs when a cache needs it.  An abandoned cache should receive a bit of extra attention with NM/NA logs in order to get it off the listing site, both to open up the area for another cache (hopefully from a CO willing to maintain), as well as to get the container removed by a cacher (ideally who filed either of the logs that led to the archival) if the CO is no longer involved.

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2 hours ago, coachstahly said:

And if they find 100 caches along the ET trail, do you believe that to be "proof" that they're now qualfied and experienced enough to be a responsible hider and maintainer of caches?

They could find 1000 caches of all types, and they still have zero experience in taking coordinates.

 

And you could find 1000 well maintained caches and have no idea what *not* to do.

 

I think the whole idea that a newbie learns about hiding caches by finding them is invalid. It's true they'll get some experience about geocaching, but mostly in what's commonly done in their area, good or bad, and very little about how to hide caches that don't require constant maintenance at the coordinates posted. Those take experience *hiding* caches and then maintaining..

 

I don't really see that many caches posted with terrible coordinates. And when one comes up, as often as not, FTF figures out where it is based on hints, posted better coordinates, and -- in most cases -- the newbie updates the coordinates with the suggested ones. Then they make sure to post better coordinates for their 2nd cache. It's a learning process, and I don't really see a good way to learn it without doing it. The experienced cachers in my area tend to be understanding and helpful to people just learning to hide.

 

I also don't see a huge problem with abandonment. If a cache can't be found, it gets archived soon enough.

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On 10/10/2021 at 5:40 PM, LoIQ said:

 

I disagree with this and actually quite vehemently.   

 

I can't tell you how many times, and trust me they're numerous, that I have searched for caches placed by newbies that just simply aren't there.  Geocaching is no different than any other hobby in that it ensnares and excites, but often that excitement fades, and in some cases fades quickly.  Cachers are human.  They lose interest in things. 

 

When newbies rush out and hide caches, without a minimum amount of experience in getting good coordinates, knowing what hide types are possible, etc., it isn't just a problem with bad coordinates,  it becomes a problem of abandoned caches.  Depending on where you live, it doesn't take too long of a search on your local map to find a cache with a lot of DNFs where the owner has just fallen away never to log onto the site or check on their caches again.  It's impossible for the reviewers to keep track of all of these given how many caches are under their responsibility to control, so the responsibility falls to active members to hit the "needs archived" to bring the problematic cache up for attention.   Also, as we all know, a cache that isn't maintained is just a euphemism for trash.  I think we can all agree that trash of any sort shouldn't be left out in the environment.  

 

Requiring new cachers to have a minimum number of finds - for purposes of conversation, let's say 100, but the minimum number is debatable - would go a long way to make sure the hider is going to stick with the hobby and maintain their caches.  Not having such a requirement leads to a ton of abandoned caches all over the place. 

 

I'll also add this.  Before any of you say that cachers with thousands of finds also fall away, I'll concede that's true.  However, the more experienced the cacher, and the more invested they are in the hobby, the more likely it is that they'll either archive and clean up their own caches before giving up, or put them up for adoption.  The abandonment problem is huge with new cachers who find a few, hide a few, and then drop away leaving their unmaintained caches for someone else to clean up both in the environment, and on the site.

 

My two cents for what it's worth.  

 

Cache on everyone!

 

  

I agree 100% with everything you wrote.  This has bothered me after so many long distance driving or a difficult hike to not find the cache because the owner isn't around to do maintenance especially if several cachers report a problem.  The reviewer does not know this caches needs help unless a "needs archive" notice is posted.  I did recently post a "needs archive" on a newbie cache that mostly likely was washed away in our recent floods.  there was a DNF just before me that is a very seasoned cacher.  The reviewer wrote to me said I was out of line and to give this person a break.  The cacher had 3 caches found and 1 hidden in a 6 month period.  I'd say they were not around anymore and had no intention to repair as they received a DNF and did nothing.  The reviewer had only found a few caches so how can he really judge this newbie cachers needed more time.  How much time does he need?  Before the DNF 2 cachers had found it and logged there was mold and slime in the container.  I was very unhappy with the reviewer an his attitude.  So I edited my log and took out the "needs archive".  Turns out the reviewer did have to follow the rules and he archived it.  There still wasn't any response from the cache hider.  This reviewer needs a bit more experience IMHO.  We have found abt 17,000 so I'd say we have reasonable experience to recognize an abandon cache.  When the Sate of Arizona took away our use of state land I went out and picked up my 6 caches.  I truly believe that headquarters needs to review their rules about who can hide a cache and when they qualify.  So much cache litter could be avoided and cachers frustration with those who will not provide maintenance.  Thank you for your article I do appreciate what you said as this is our most favorite hobby.

Happy caching to all.

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When I said "I'd say they were not around anymore and had no intention to repair as they received a DNF and did nothing"  I was referring to the CO of the cache.  Yes as a cache owner we are responsible to check out our caches if there seems to be a problem.  Even if just writing to the cacher who had the DNF so see if the CO could help.  I believe this is a friendly sport and we should treat our fellow cachers with respect.  Your second response was "How many geocaches are on his player account?  Yes I did look at the reviewers account to see what he has done.  If he has a different user name as a cacher I don't know that.  I was going by what is on his account when you click on his name. He has only been a reviewer in our area for several months. He joined 2/14/2021, has 7 finds 5 of which are events and 1 hide that was a test and archived.   I thought he was out of line writing to me saying I was jumping the gun on this newbie cache.  For months there were complaints of the cache being in bad shape with water in container, slimy and mold.  This cache really needed help.  I went looking for it after we had a deluge of rain and as the previous cacher said it appears to be gone. Hint said in the rocks and the rocks were right beside the road where you could see a great deal of water went by.  This proved to me the CO had no intention of fixing the problem so I asked for an "archive".  That is the only way a reviewer knows there is a problem.  Hope this clarifies your question.

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3 minutes ago, azgoldseekers said:

When I said "I'd say they were not around anymore and had no intention to repair as they received a DNF and did nothing"  I was referring to the CO of the cache.  Yes as a cache owner we are responsible to check out our caches if there seems to be a problem.  Even if just writing to the cacher who had the DNF so see if the CO could help.  I believe this is a friendly sport and we should treat our fellow cachers with respect.  Your second response was "How many geocaches are on his player account?  Yes I did look at the reviewers account to see what he has done.  If he has a different user name as a cacher I don't know that.  I was going by what is on his account when you click on his name. He has only been a reviewer in our area for several months. He joined 2/14/2021, has 7 finds 5 of which are events and 1 hide that was a test and archived.   I thought he was out of line writing to me saying I was jumping the gun on this newbie cache.  For months there were complaints of the cache being in bad shape with water in container, slimy and mold.  This cache really needed help.  I went looking for it after we had a deluge of rain and as the previous cacher said it appears to be gone. Hint said in the rocks and the rocks were right beside the road where you could see a great deal of water went by.  This proved to me the CO had no intention of fixing the problem so I asked for an "archive".  That is the only way a reviewer knows there is a problem.  Hope this clarifies your question.

Reviewers are chosen from EXPERIENCED cachers. They have a different player account than their reviewer account. Most reviewer accounts I've seen only have a few caches listed.

 

DNF means the person looking didn't find the cache. NM means the cache needs maintenance. This is why it's very important to log a NM when a cache needs maintenance. It brings a notice to the CO.  In my opinion, jumping from a DNF to Archive was not the correct step in this situation, and I also see this as "jumping the gun".  Of course, I can't see all the details of the cache, I'm only responding based on what I know, and seeing the previous logs may change my mind. I understand that others have mentioned the poor condition of the container, but did any of them log an NM? They should have!

 

https://www.geocaching.com/help/index.php?pg=kb.chapter&id=107&pgid=434

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I did not know that reviewers used a new name when they become a volunteer.  I did not know that NM report also alerts the reviewer, I thought it was only if NA was posted.  I will use NM from now on.  If you wish to see the cache I have been talking about.  It was GC962JW.  I very seldom use NA unless, through my experience, believe there is no hope that it will be fixed.  I am adamant about people leaving caches when they move on.  I personally take care of an oldie where the CO has been out of the picture for at least 10 years.  I would love to adopt it but that can't be done.  We've been caching regular since Aug 2010.  Sorry I even voiced my opinion about newbie cachers hiding caches way too soon but it is a sore subject with me.  Seems to be a trend these days.  When the State of Arizona closed state lands from geocaching a while back I asked a gal in Tucson if she was going to need help picking up here geocache series and she said no as she had no intention to do so. I had six and picked them up.  Later the State changed their mind and allowed caches to resume, thanks to a hard working crew who worked with the State folks on this matter.  I have seen way too many trashed cache containers in my time and usually replace them. 

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1 minute ago, azgoldseekers said:

I did not know that NM report also alerts the reviewer

I don't think it does alert the reviewer, but it probably plays into the Cache Health Score algorithm, along with the DNFs, which does get the Reviewer's attention if nothing is done. I may not be saying that exactly correctly.

I totally understand your situation. I'm just saying I would have logged a NM before a NA.

Can you provide a link? I can't search for the archived cache. Thanks!

 

I have my own issues with newbie hiders. I get it! And surprisingly, my favorite hide of all time was by a newbie.

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Last week we went over the mountain to Verde Valley to cache.  Not a good day for us.  6 finds, 6 dnf.  GC97183 has 7 DNF's.  I wrote a pleasant log.  The CO not on site since Jul 29.  Maybe I should go back and log a NM.  I got help on 2 DNF's so will go back another day.  One of the owners responded immediately and said was there and in good shape.  I don't "jump the gun" on all that I don't find, I just had a feeling with this one.  We have cached in our community for a long time so have most of them so have to go a distance to have a caching day.  We were lucky enough to take an RV trip a few weeks ago.  We got 2 caches from 2000, then over to Kansas to get the infamous "Mingo" and then to Colorado for Tarryall.  We now have completed our Jasmer.

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11 minutes ago, azgoldseekers said:

The CO not on site since Jul 29

But has he been on the app? We don't know! That date is only for the website.

 

7 of the most recent 8 logs are DNFs, and the one Found It probably isn't (that's one thing I see a lot with newbies in my area). If they don't find it, they still log a Found It.

So I see the most recent 8 logs indicate the cache is probably missing. But NOT EVEN ONE NM log!! I think a NM is totally warranted! If no response in maybe 30 days, then I'd consider a NA log.

 

In my personal opinion, this CO is probably no longer interested in the game. Just my guess. But I think a NM should be the first step.

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1 hour ago, Max and 99 said:

DNF means the person looking didn't find the cache. NM means the cache needs maintenance. This is why it's very important to log a NM when a cache needs maintenance. It brings a notice to the CO.  In my opinion, jumping from a DNF to Archive was not the correct step in this situation, and I also see this as "jumping the gun".  Of course, I can't see all the details of the cache, I'm only responding based on what I know, and seeing the previous logs may change my mind. I understand that others have mentioned the poor condition of the container, but did any of them log an NM? They should have!

 

Yes, on one of my caches the last two logs were DNFs:

 

image.png.c1e1b612a12582061a817f9a45c545ae.png

 

These are the logs:

 

image.png.1dbf51aeb63838cc0257d458c5b6f568.png

 

There's no reason for me or anyone else to assume that the cache needs maintenance or has been abandoned, and in fact since it's only a few minutes from home I have checked just to be sure and it's still there waiting for those two experienced cachers to come back and have another try. It's very well camoflaged as it's in a high muggle area so it does get a fair number of DNFs (5 so far in just on a year).

 

If you think a cache needs owner attention, log an NM to give the owner a heads up and a chance to respond, even if you think they're no longer active (some I know haven't found any caches in years but still maintain their hides). If there's no response after a month or so, then it's time to involve a reviewer with an NA.

 

Edited by barefootjeff
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I had a DNF on a cache last week that had 7 DNF's.  I did not report it.  I usually just read what the dnf logs are.  I had a very difficult cache to find - no go.  A friend gave me a hint so will try again another time.  The log usually indicate if there really is a problem.

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2 hours ago, azgoldseekers said:

I did not know that reviewers used a new name when they become a volunteer.  I did not know that NM report also alerts the reviewer, I thought it was only if NA was posted.  I will use NM from now on.  If you wish to see the cache I have been talking about.  It was GC962JW.

 

Thank you for linking to the cache you brought up.  I think you mischaracterized what happened.  I also think you could stand to learn more about the cache health score algorithm, the process for logging DNF's vs. "Needs Maintenance" vs. "Needs Archived," and the process for selecting Community Volunteer Reviewers.  The Reviewer who decisioned your report has many thousands of finds and many hundreds of hides.

 

Newbie cacher or veteran cacher, there is always more to learn.

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8 hours ago, Max and 99 said:

But has he been on the app? We don't know!

 

It's not as reliable, but now that we can't see what caches a user has found, I've looked at what souvenirs a person has collected as a rough indicator of activity. 

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10 hours ago, Unit473L said:

It's not as reliable, but now that we can't see what caches a user has found, I've looked at what souvenirs a person has collected as a rough indicator of activity. 

I just realized you said this as a basic member. I agree the souvenir check could be helpful if they aren't hiding any of them. 

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On 10/22/2021 at 3:36 AM, Unit473L said:

 

It's not as reliable, but now that we can't see what caches a user has found, I've looked at what souvenirs a person has collected as a rough indicator of activity. 

 

I checked and I can still see what caches a user has found.  Has something changed?

 

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On 10/11/2021 at 8:31 PM, barefootjeff said:

 

What would help enormously, I'm sure, would be if HQ added a "Take Coordinates" function to the app that:

  • Took multiple readings and averaged them over a minute or more (I'd like to say ten minutes or more but I'm not sure the average cacher's patience would last that long)
  • Used only GPS instead of whatever mixture of GPS, cell tower triangulation and wifi the phone wants to use. I've found the latter mix to often be wildly inaccurate.

The present recommended method of just taking a spot reading by adding a waypoint to an existing cache leaves much to be desired, both in user-friendliness and accuracy.

 

I use Google Maps. Find the spot where I want to place a cache, Right click on the map and it will pull up coordinates for you that you can then use in the initial cache submission page.

HOWEVER.... if you every have to update or change the coordinates you will now need to use a coordinate converter as the geocaching.com page will no longer allow you to edit the coordinates because it converted it into DTM (?) coordinates. 

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