Jump to content

This Game's Easy...


Followers 3

Recommended Posts

...or at least it is when you play it by some peoples' rules.

 

A recently joined cacher has logged the following notes in relation to caches in a local series which I attempted a few weeks ago, several of the caches are in a state of disrepair / disappearence, to say the least - but minor details like that aren't going to stop this cacher logging a find. Logs read as follows:

 

1) Cache is gone. camo material left behind. Another photo job

2) Looks like another one muggled. Pic of tdee(?) to prove find. (the photo is just a general view of the area where the cache should be)

3) Another may have been muggled photo to prove find (photo as above)

4) Found the Gz but engineering works mean cache may be gone. See photo... (guess what – a photo of the engineering works)

 

To confirm - all of the above have been logged as "Found it"

 

Following the logic of 4), all we need to do to claim a find is perform the not inconsiderable task of following the arrow on our GPSr and hey presto - a find! No matter if it's not there, not my fault guv'nor. Gizza smiley face for the sheer effort of walking there. Now I know where I'm going wrong.

Link to comment

He took a picture of one cache though, showing its logbook (sort of linkie), so I guess they do actually go and find many if not most caches that they log. Personally, if the container isn't in my hand it's a DNF as I assume that any cache I cannot find is due to the hider being more devious than me :)

 

edit - looking at that cache, nearly a year with an unusable logbook?? Seems the CO might have quit the game as well :(

Edited by frosty68
Link to comment

Frosty68 - I'm sure you're right, lots of the caches in this series are seriously neglected, and it does look like the CO is no longer in love with geocaching for whatever reason

If they have been abandoned and they are in need of maintenace then its time to stick Needs archived logs on them.

 

At the end of the day "finders" are only kidding themselves with logging caches they did not find and sign the log, or multiple finds on the same cache is also something you see. I have seen lots of cachers do similar things many of them soon get bored and disappear, I guess they find caching far to easy as they always get a smilie no matter what :blink:

Link to comment

I suspect that the cachers in question simply haven't yet realised that it's not a "find" without a signature in the log book.

Perhaps a tactfully-worded e-mail would suffice? In case they don't see the point, you could remind them that other cachers will be misled by the "found" log as they won't be able to read the text of the log and will assume that the cache WAS "found"; leading to a wasted search.

If I'm finding a series of caches I normally print a list of the caches, along with hints and log summary (such as "FNNFF"). If the latest entry is a "F" then I'll spend a lot more time searching than if it's a "N".

Link to comment

My number one saying when Geocaching is 'everyone plays their own game' From what I have seen and heard from going to Geocaching events ect, a lot of geocachers do monitor other geocachers ect, I do myself, I have friends and other cachers i watch to see how they're doing, where they're caching and sometimes read their logs. If the cacher in your case, starts jumping numbers fast, logging puzzles he hans't actually found, then he will soon get a name for himself. As a cache owner, I would be reluctant to let him log finds with just a picture, but then again, I wouldn't want to get a bad name and start deleting peoples logs, would cause more aggravation than it's worth!

 

Haha like said before, I may start going for walks and loggings finds, "Found it at 3.15 on a bright sunny day... well st least my GPSr said i walked within 50ft of it, danm no pen"

 

I'm going to stick to my armchair logging :P

Edited by squirtchy
Link to comment

I know everyone plays the game their own way etc but bogus logging DOES matter.

 

We have a cache on our watch list which we DNFed some time ago no one has found it since but someone accidentally logged a DNF as a find causing the next person to log:

 

'Searched high and low, as previous geocacher had said they had found it today!!'

 

:blink:

 

Mark

Link to comment

Maybe contact the cache owners explaining that who ever is logging finds without actually finding a cache and signing a book isn't actually playing the game properly, and that it would be sensible to maybe delete the logs or contact the cacher logging the finds saying that it's not acceptable!

Link to comment

Thought my ears were burning?

 

I've been geocaching since only March of this year and yet I have learned more about the subject in the last 3 weeks than in all the rest of the time before that.

 

What have I learned?

 

1. I'm not playing this game just for me.

 

I thought it was a way to get me more outdoors of a weekend. Put a bit of purpose behind it so as to make it more enjoyable and that my logs were a record of my visits. This is not the case. I am actually playing the game for others too as the previous posts on this forum highlight.

 

2. I'm not playing this game just for me.

 

After a day's geocaching I like to flop in my chair with a cuppa and watch telly with a sense of achievement. I tend to post field logs with the iPhone as we go so no need to do copious amounts of internetting on my return. I didn't expect that after a days geocaching some people go home, log their own cache visits then sit and scrutinise those of others for any suspicion of "foul play"?

 

3. Geocaching is not just a bit of fun.

 

For "The GeoStapo" this is not "a bit of fun" this is a very serious past-time with very serious rules that must be taken very seriously or else you shall get seriously taken to task or worse still possibly something more serious! I mean - Seriously?

 

4. I was doing it wrong.

 

Happy Humphrey I salute you for your comment "I suspect that the cachers in question simply haven't yet realised that it's not a "find" without a signature in the log book. Perhaps a tactfully-worded e-mail would suffice?"

 

For the reasons listed above I wasn't aware that logging a find for (what I classed to be) a "I would have found it if it was there" was such a bad thing. When you know it's not there and you know where "there" is, using a bit of initiative is not allowed and I should just accept a DNF for me and post a warning for other followers. I can accept this as a standard to play by and can see the benefit to all. As for the tactfully worded email? Not if the GeoStapo have their way (or should that be haff zerr vay?)

 

5. Some people in life are truly joyless.

 

6. Most people in life however are not.

 

7. Airto Moreira is a world famous Brazilian percussionist and has no links to the IRA.

 

8. I am sorry if any of my logs have inconvenienced anyone or spoilt anyone's enjoyment of Geocaching.

 

9. Some people just don't understand my sarcasm?

 

Rant over.

 

For the record I don't mind being put straight over my "bending of the rules" and can understand the reasons behind the need for me to modify the way I play. All future logs will be correct according to "Ze Rules" and will no doubt undergo a thorough vetting (not wetting - that makes it hard to write on?) by the Geostapo.

 

I can also see, with hindsight, the laughable nature of my "find" at Brummie Cut - Rocky. But then I can still remember how to laugh?

 

Happy Geo-caching all and thank you for pointing me in the right direction.

Link to comment

At the end of the day it's your choice/your game.

 

I guess it's just if you get a 'reputation' with local cachers this may cause a few problems...but if you just go out alone (with friends) then you won't be hunted down with a big stick.

 

The only thing is it's only "there" when you find it, often it's hard to say it's missing unless you find pieces of the cache scattered around etc

 

 

9. Some people just don't understand my sarcasm?

 

I think it's great, although I'm not really into Brazilian percussionists...

Edited by eusty
Link to comment

Thought my ears were burning?

 

I've been geocaching since only March of this year and yet I have learned more about the subject in the last 3 weeks than in all the rest of the time before that.

 

What have I learned?

 

1. I'm not playing this game just for me.

 

I thought it was a way to get me more outdoors of a weekend. Put a bit of purpose behind it so as to make it more enjoyable and that my logs were a record of my visits. This is not the case. I am actually playing the game for others too as the previous posts on this forum highlight.

 

2. I'm not playing this game just for me.

 

After a day's geocaching I like to flop in my chair with a cuppa and watch telly with a sense of achievement. I tend to post field logs with the iPhone as we go so no need to do copious amounts of internetting on my return. I didn't expect that after a days geocaching some people go home, log their own cache visits then sit and scrutinise those of others for any suspicion of "foul play"?

 

3. Geocaching is not just a bit of fun.

 

For "The GeoStapo" this is not "a bit of fun" this is a very serious past-time with very serious rules that must be taken very seriously or else you shall get seriously taken to task or worse still possibly something more serious! I mean - Seriously?

 

4. I was doing it wrong.

 

Happy Humphrey I salute you for your comment "I suspect that the cachers in question simply haven't yet realised that it's not a "find" without a signature in the log book. Perhaps a tactfully-worded e-mail would suffice?"

 

For the reasons listed above I wasn't aware that logging a find for (what I classed to be) a "I would have found it if it was there" was such a bad thing. When you know it's not there and you know where "there" is, using a bit of initiative is not allowed and I should just accept a DNF for me and post a warning for other followers. I can accept this as a standard to play by and can see the benefit to all. As for the tactfully worded email? Not if the GeoStapo have their way (or should that be haff zerr vay?)

 

5. Some people in life are truly joyless.

 

6. Most people in life however are not.

 

7. Airto Moreira is a world famous Brazilian percussionist and has no links to the IRA.

 

8. I am sorry if any of my logs have inconvenienced anyone or spoilt anyone's enjoyment of Geocaching.

 

9. Some people just don't understand my sarcasm?

 

Rant over.

 

For the record I don't mind being put straight over my "bending of the rules" and can understand the reasons behind the need for me to modify the way I play. All future logs will be correct according to "Ze Rules" and will no doubt undergo a thorough vetting (not wetting - that makes it hard to write on?) by the Geostapo.

 

I can also see, with hindsight, the laughable nature of my "find" at Brummie Cut - Rocky. But then I can still remember how to laugh?

 

Happy Geo-caching all and thank you for pointing me in the right direction.

 

Welcome, and good for you coming on to the forum and acknowledging some shortcomings and learnings. Etiquette and community policing are regular topics on the forum and rather than being 'Geostapo' as you call it I see it more as lively debate, information and honest opinions. It can also be good fun and a sense of humour is essential.

 

You can play the game however you like but dont expect everyone to agree with you.

 

I hope this experience does not put you off Geocaching but I get the feeling that you are pretty thick skinned. Happy caching.

Link to comment

Well done to rob*ren for coming on and admitting the shortcomings, I dare say that most would have reacted differently!

 

The most disappointing aspect of all of this is that...you've never heard of Airto Moreira! Well, here's what you've been missing all these years, the great man at his best, on percussion and unmistakable vocals / noises. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tweQFL43XjM

Link to comment

At the end of the day it's your choice/your game.

 

Well, not completely. All of rob*ren's sarcasm aside, the logs someone writes are not only for themselves. The logs are also for the CO and for other cachers. A "found it" log for a cache that's not actually there tells them that the cache is in fact there and can be found. Reading the log would of course clear that up, but not everybody does that all the time. That's why a bogus "found it" log actually is something that can affect other players.

Link to comment
I hope this experience does not put you off Geocaching but I get the feeling that you are pretty thick skinned. Happy caching.

 

Not a chance! I really enjoy it. It's got a bit more difficult now I actually have to find the sucka's?

 

:lol:

 

That made me just laugh out loud. That is where the pure frustration with this hobby comes in, trying to find the bloody things. I have ripped jeans, torn a hole in one of my work shirts, cut my face, got stung, stood in numerous dog poos and much more. Now I come to think of it, I prefer your version of doing things, much less danger of ruining clothes or injury, perhaps you could be setting a new trend?! ;)

 

Welcome to this great hobby and well done for taking the comments so well. Enjoy

Link to comment

1. I'm not playing this game just for me.

 

I thought it was a way to get me more outdoors of a weekend. Put a bit of purpose behind it so as to make it more enjoyable and that my logs were a record of my visits. This is not the case. I am actually playing the game for others too as the previous posts on this forum highlight.

I think you had this spot-on at the start and I hope you don't change your attitude because of being picked up on a point of etiquette. As far as I'm concerned (and geocaching.com is designed with this in mind), you're only playing the game for yourself and your logs are your own record. It's all about getting outdoors and active.

Where the etiquette comes in is that you don't want to mislead others into thinking a cache log book is signable when it might not be. So you only have to log online as accurately as you can.

Personally I like to add a few words as well so I can look back on the logs and remember the cache, but even that is optional; so if you find logging tedious, only the most pernickerty cache owners will give you a hard time. Which you can just ignore anyway. :)

 

P.S. Being a Weather Report fan, I've heard of Airto Moreira...

Edited by Happy Humphrey
Link to comment

 

Personally I like to add a few words as well so I can look back on the logs and remember the cache

 

This is one aspect which I really like and the reason why we try and do individual logs for every cache.

I might see a cache mentioned on a forum or somewhere and if it's one we've found I'll have a look at our log to jog my memory

 

We also include a find count on every log. I'm usually amazed when looking back at an old find to see that it was a few thousand caches ago! :)

 

Mark

Link to comment
... you're only playing the game for yourself and your logs are your own record ...

 

Where the etiquette comes in is that you don't want to mislead others into thinking a cache log book is signable when it might not be. So you only have to log online as accurately as you can.

 

Personally I like to add a few words as well so I can look back on the logs and remember the cache, but even that is optional; so if you find logging tedious, only the most pernickerty cache owners will give you a hard time. Which you can just ignore anyway. :)

While I have the utmost respect for HH and his views, as a new cacher you may also wish to be aware that there are alternative views on this.

 

Logs are pretty much the only reward that cache setters get for the time, effort and expense in setting and maintaining caches. I know this doesn't bother HH at all, but I believe most cache setters would stop setting caches if everybody wrote blank, terse or identical logs.

 

Logs can also provide enjoyment and information for fellow cachers other than the cache owner.

 

I'm a great believer in quality caching. This means good quality caches, but it also means quality logs. It does NOT mean that every log has to say what a great cache it is, even if it isn't. What it does mean is that some thought and effort put into logs almost always makes them better logs. I do sometimes write critical logs, but they are all given some thought and individual treatment, even those for a long circuit.

 

Good quality logs also doesn't mean spelling and punctuation have to be perfect, if these are weak areas (I think people should make an effort to get them right, but never criticise those who do make the effort but still struggle with them).

 

As with most things in life, what you get out is in proportion to what you put in. Whatever you do, whether it be caching or anything else, I think you should try to make a good job of it.

 

Rgds, Andy

Link to comment

I don't disagree with Amberel's general view on this, and I value getting to read interesting logs on my caches (and other caches).

But I really think that if writing individual online logs is seen as a pointless chore to some people then I'd rather they didn't bother forcing themselves for the sake of others.

IMO if a significant part of the game is dull then they're likely to give up altogether sooner or later. There are always enough people around who are happy to make their comments, and the real point of the game to me is to encourage people to go out and visit places, not to spend hours on phones and PCs.

Link to comment

I think this has gone a little off subject, however I always do try and give a individual log of a cache, sometimes it's just one line, or sometimes it's a paragraph of the trouble I had finding it, like one on Saturday, doing a night cache and got stung on the head by stinging nettles (which I still logged a DNF for lol) or my 4 year olds first cache.

 

I hope to think my misfortunes put a smile on somones face, looking back it certainly does put a smile on mine.

Link to comment

I like to write a log, usually of several lines as that's my style. An added benefit is that when I look back, I can actually picture myself at the cache in question as most of my logs differ from each other. Unlike Allieballie who has an encyclopaedic knowledge of every single cache she's ever been to (and she's found at least 3 times more than I have!), I don't have such a good memory, so the logs are an excellent reminder, whether or not they were interesting finds (that's where favourite points add extra benefit).

 

:)

Link to comment

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
Followers 3
×
×
  • Create New...