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Caches in Space


buzzy_cacher
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Interesting to note that the cache-placer has only two hides. On the other one he states,

For the record, this geocache is real, and can be found. Most years Deep Ocean Expeditions (www.deepoceanexpeditions.com) takes people down to these vents, and you can go too! It is done as a cooperation between eco-tourism and extremophile research. Scientific study of high temperature bacteria and anaerobic life forms are subsidised by taking tourists to the vents. I have visited them twice myself. With 10-30 people visiting a year, I presume one will be a geocacher like me... sooner or later!"

And yet despite being a member since 2002, he only has 1 find.

 

 

WAIT! Michael Jackson died!!!

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Interesting to note that the cache-placer has only two hides. On the other one he states,

For the record, this geocache is real, and can be found. Most years Deep Ocean Expeditions (www.deepoceanexpeditions.com) takes people down to these vents, and you can go too! It is done as a cooperation between eco-tourism and extremophile research. Scientific study of high temperature bacteria and anaerobic life forms are subsidised by taking tourists to the vents. I have visited them twice myself. With 10-30 people visiting a year, I presume one will be a geocacher like me... sooner or later!"

And yet despite being a member since 2002, he only has 1 find.

 

 

WAIT! Michael Jackson died!!!

No, Michael and Elvis are alive and well on the International Space Station. Who do you think hid the cache there? Shh... don't tell anybody.

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Seems to me that the first "geocache" -- and cacher -- in space preceded the ISS and the inception of Groundspeak by a great many years. Surveyor 3 was placed on the moon in April 1967, and Alan Bean got FTF credit in November 1969. But perhaps this is lunar-caching.

 

Source: http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/LRO/mult...3_apollo12.html

 

383417main_surveyor3_full.jpg

Edited by lee_rimar
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Seems to me that the first "geocache" -- and cacher -- in space preceded the ISS and the inception of Groundspeak by a great many years. Surveyor 3 was placed on the moon in April 1967, and Alan Bean got FTF credit in November 1969. But perhaps this is lunar-caching.

Source: http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/LRO/mult...3_apollo12.html

Oh, come on now... everybody knows the moon landing was faked!!

 

:laughing:

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14708: "NEW" logo appearing next to no-longer-new features on geocaching.com

Removed "new" icon from certain features. No word yet on "old" icon

 

15191: Caches In Space

Clarified cosmic geocaching guidelines

 

I anxiously await the cosmic geocaching guidelines, though due to budget constraints, these will be of only theoretical interest to me personally.

 

The OLD icon however, is something that might be immediately applicable for me. Hoping it comes along soon.

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The OLD icon however, is something that might be immediately applicable for me. Hoping it comes along soon.

I would love to see what Bittsen can come up with for that!

 

(besides... just think of how often we'd be able to use it here, too!! Instead of "You were away for a while, weren't you?" and "Did you know that Michael Jackson died?", we could have simply posted the Old Icon!)

Edited by knowschad
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Interesting to note that the cache-placer has only two hides. On the other one he states,

 

And yet despite being a member since 2002, he only has 1 find.

 

 

The cache placer is a bit of an eccentric public figure. I would not be at all surprised if he placed those on a puppet account.

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Geocaches in Space (or other planets/spacecraft)

 

We do allow cache listings in outer space such as in the International Space Station or on Mars. Make sure you can land or connect to the space station/planet for it to be acceptable as a listing. Keep in mind, however, that due to the saturation guideline you can't place another cache on the ISS since one is already listed there.

 

http://www.geocaching.com/about/guidelines.aspx#space

 

well, I'm glad that's been clarified :laughing:

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I am concerned with the introduction of humor to the cache listing guidelines. This will no doubt cause the most problems for the reviewers. I am convinced that lack of a sense of humor is a requirement for becoming a reviewer. The reviewers are likely to take this seriously and asked people who submit caches in space to confirm they can land or connect to the space station/planet for it to be published. I'm not sure what proof will be acceptable. My guess is we will see threads complaining the reviewers are asking for information that they don't required for any other caches.

 

The new guidelines also don't address the issue of what coordinates to use. For the space station the idea seems to be to use the coordinates of the Baikonur Cosmodrome; with the longitude changed from E to W to put the cache in the ocean off Nova Scotia. If these inaccurate coordinates are in fact acceptable the guideline needs to be changed to indicate that the owner does not have to obtain the coordinates with a GPS and the use of accurate GPS coordinates as an integral part of the hunt is not required to be demonstrated as it is for all other physical cache submissions.

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I am concerned with the introduction of humor to the cache listing guidelines. This will no doubt cause the most problems for the reviewers. I am convinced that lack of a sense of humor is a requirement for becoming a reviewer. The reviewers are likely to take this seriously and asked people who submit caches in space to confirm they can land or connect to the space station/planet for it to be published. I'm not sure what proof will be acceptable. My guess is we will see threads complaining the reviewers are asking for information that they don't required for any other caches.

 

The new guidelines also don't address the issue of what coordinates to use. For the space station the idea seems to be to use the coordinates of the Baikonur Cosmodrome; with the longitude changed from E to W to put the cache in the ocean off Nova Scotia. If these inaccurate coordinates are in fact acceptable the guideline needs to be changed to indicate that the owner does not have to obtain the coordinates with a GPS and the use of accurate GPS coordinates as an integral part of the hunt is not required to be demonstrated as it is for all other physical cache submissions.

 

Furthermore, one would stipulate that caches no longer will have to be available to anyone. You could not, for instance, build your own space ship and go to the space station to log your cache. If you even try, they will likely treat you as a trespasser.

So, will we have a run of caches that require explicit permission and paid transportation just to seek the cache?

 

It sounds like a commercial cache to me.

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Interesting to note that the cache-placer has only two hides. On the other one he states,

 

And yet despite being a member since 2002, he only has 1 find.

 

The cache placer is a bit of an eccentric public figure. I would not be at all surprised if he placed those on a puppet account.

If I have $30 million to splurge on a trip to the space station, and demonstrated it by hiding a cache there, I wouldn't publicize my daily whereabouts by logging my finds under that account.

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Furthermore, one would stipulate that caches no longer will have to be available to anyone. You could not, for instance, build your own space ship and go to the space station to log your cache. If you even try, they will likely treat you as a trespasser.

So, will we have a run of caches that require explicit permission and paid transportation just to seek the cache?

 

It sounds like a commercial cache to me.

Do caches ever have a "must be available to anyone" requirement?

 

Caches on military bases in Iraq / Afghanistan - explicit permission. I know of at least one cache not far from me where you require explicit permission to enter the grounds.

 

Caches in foreign country (let's say, Falkland Islands) - paid transportation. You also require permission to enter foreign countries, much to the surprise of a few people.

 

There is a "fee required" attribute.

 

Then there's extreme terrain caches.

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1) I am concerned with the introduction of humor to the cache listing guidelines. This will no doubt cause the most problems for the reviewers....

 

2) My guess is we will see threads complaining...

 

1) I'm sure yer right on that. I figure Puppymonster and Keystone can handle it. After those two??? of course, I'm not sure that there really are any other reviewers, aside from maybe Rogue.

 

2) yes!

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Furthermore, one would stipulate that caches no longer will have to be available to anyone. You could not, for instance, build your own space ship and go to the space station to log your cache. If you even try, they will likely treat you as a trespasser.

So, will we have a run of caches that require explicit permission and paid transportation just to seek the cache?

 

It sounds like a commercial cache to me.

Do caches ever have a "must be available to anyone" requirement?

 

I believe I have seen that in print from a reviewer or in the guidelines somewhere...

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If I have $30 million to splurge on a trip to the space station, and demonstrated it by hiding a cache there, I wouldn't publicize my daily whereabouts by logging my finds under that account.

 

The side of the coin being, his home (Brittania Manor), however, is a rather well known landmark in Texas. It was featured on MTv Cribs, Lifestyles of The Rich And Famous, and was the site of a world famous Halloween haunted house for over a decade.

 

To call Richard Garriott eccentric is understating things.

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Furthermore, one would stipulate that caches no longer will have to be available to anyone. You could not, for instance, build your own space ship and go to the space station to log your cache. If you even try, they will likely treat you as a trespasser.

So, will we have a run of caches that require explicit permission and paid transportation just to seek the cache?

It sounds like a commercial cache to me.

Do caches ever have a "must be available to anyone" requirement?

Of COURSE they do!!
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Its one thing for Jeremy to approve a cache on the ISS. But the guidelines should be clarified to state that if you are placing one on the Moon or Mars, you need the explicit permission of the mine owner. I suppose thats covered by earthly guidelines, but from what I hear on coasttocoast (or read on abovetopsecret) there is a lot of activity up there. At the very least, we should be aware of the various claims that might interfere with caching.

Edited by Erickson
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Furthermore, one would stipulate that caches no longer will have to be available to anyone. You could not, for instance, build your own space ship and go to the space station to log your cache. If you even try, they will likely treat you as a trespasser.

So, will we have a run of caches that require explicit permission and paid transportation just to seek the cache?

 

It sounds like a commercial cache to me.

Do caches ever have a "must be available to anyone" requirement?

 

Caches on military bases in Iraq / Afghanistan - explicit permission. I know of at least one cache not far from me where you require explicit permission to enter the grounds.

 

Caches in foreign country (let's say, Falkland Islands) - paid transportation. You also require permission to enter foreign countries, much to the surprise of a few people.

 

There is a "fee required" attribute.

 

Then there's extreme terrain caches.

 

Agreed. There are a lot of caches that, realistically, most geocachers will never be able to find due to their remoteness or travel expenses required to get to the area. When I found a cache in Zimbabwe I paid $30 for a day visa and another $15 for an entrance fee into the park where it was located. I was only in Zimbabwe for about 2 hours. There is a cache in Tanzania that I may be able to find that has text in the description which indicates that the terrain rating does not include the difficulty of getting to Tanzania and the park where it's located. Even with modern jets and fairly short layovers in three different airports on the way back it's going to take me almost 24 hours to get home from that cache.

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Furthermore, one would stipulate that caches no longer will have to be available to anyone. You could not, for instance, build your own space ship and go to the space station to log your cache. If you even try, they will likely treat you as a trespasser.

So, will we have a run of caches that require explicit permission and paid transportation just to seek the cache?

 

It sounds like a commercial cache to me.

Do caches ever have a "must be available to anyone" requirement?

 

Caches on military bases in Iraq / Afghanistan - explicit permission. I know of at least one cache not far from me where you require explicit permission to enter the grounds.

 

Caches in foreign country (let's say, Falkland Islands) - paid transportation. You also require permission to enter foreign countries, much to the surprise of a few people.

 

There is a "fee required" attribute.

 

Then there's extreme terrain caches.

 

My reviewr made me put on the "Not available in Winter" attribute for my cache on a ski hill due to the commercial guidline. Maybe I should ask if I can change that to the Fee Required attribute.

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My reviewr made me put on the "Not available in Winter" attribute for my cache on a ski hill due to the commercial guidline. Maybe I should ask if I can change that to the Fee Required attribute.

If a cache is not available in winter does that mean it is disabled for a 1/4 of the year???
That happens frequently here in Minnesota, except that calling winter here "1/4 year" is rather optimistic. Except that often they are actually disabled for the winter, not just marked with the attribute.
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My reviewr made me put on the "Not available in Winter" attribute for my cache on a ski hill due to the commercial guidline. Maybe I should ask if I can change that to the Fee Required attribute.

 

If a cache is not available in winter does that mean it is disabled for a 1/4 of the year???

The thing is that is it always available. But to get around the commercial requirement, the reviewer had me add in that attribute.

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My reviewr made me put on the "Not available in Winter" attribute for my cache on a ski hill due to the commercial guidline. Maybe I should ask if I can change that to the Fee Required attribute.

 

If a cache is not available in winter does that mean it is disabled for a 1/4 of the year???

The thing is that is it always available. But to get around the commercial requirement, the reviewer had me add in that attribute.

 

That's odd. Last time I checked, it's perfectly legal to WALK up a ski slope. Your cache would still be available, would it not?

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My reviewr made me put on the "Not available in Winter" attribute for my cache on a ski hill due to the commercial guidline. Maybe I should ask if I can change that to the Fee Required attribute.

 

If a cache is not available in winter does that mean it is disabled for a 1/4 of the year???

The thing is that is it always available. But to get around the commercial requirement, the reviewer had me add in that attribute.

 

That's odd. Last time I checked, it's perfectly legal to WALK up a ski slope. Your cache would still be available, would it not?

Most ski hills will not let you walk up the slope during skiing hours (usualy 0930h to 1600h). It is dangerous.

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...1973 IIRC...
Nope.

 

Apollo 14 (Alan Shepherd's golf outing) was in in February 1971. Apollo 17 (last manned space flight out of low-earth orbit) was December 1972 and visited a different area. It's a safe bet nobody has retreived Shepherd's golf balls or any of the other swag left from any of the Apollo missions.

 

This would be a different category though: Lunar Caching. See post #7 in this thread.

Edited by lee_rimar
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...1973 IIRC...
Nope.

 

Apollo 14 (Alan Shepherd's golf outing) was in in February 1971. Apollo 17 (last manned space flight out of low-earth orbit) was December 1972 and visited a different area. It's a safe bet nobody has retreived Shepherd's golf balls or any of the other swag left from any of the Apollo missions.

 

This would be a different category though: Lunar Caching. See post #7 in this thread.

 

Are you sure?

I saw that, in 1979, the Jettison Scrap and Salvage company took a spaceship named "Vulture" to the moon and reclaimed some of the equipment left there.

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...1973 IIRC...
Nope.

 

Apollo 14 (Alan Shepherd's golf outing) was in in February 1971. Apollo 17 (last manned space flight out of low-earth orbit) was December 1972 and visited a different area. It's a safe bet nobody has retreived Shepherd's golf balls or any of the other swag left from any of the Apollo missions.

 

This would be a different category though: Lunar Caching. See post #7 in this thread.

 

Are you sure?

I saw that, in 1979, the Jettison Scrap and Salvage company took a spaceship named "Vulture" to the moon and reclaimed some of the equipment left there.

 

Oh, my. I think you just rearranged one of my memory cells. I do remember that. And I had tried so hard to forget :D

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...1973 IIRC...
Nope.

 

Apollo 14 (Alan Shepherd's golf outing) was in in February 1971. Apollo 17 (last manned space flight out of low-earth orbit) was December 1972 and visited a different area. It's a safe bet nobody has retreived Shepherd's golf balls or any of the other swag left from any of the Apollo missions.

 

This would be a different category though: Lunar Caching. See post #7 in this thread.

 

Are you sure?

I saw that, in 1979, the Jettison Scrap and Salvage company took a spaceship named "Vulture" to the moon and reclaimed some of the equipment left there.

I wonder if the altoids container with a slip of paper in it was among the equipment taken.

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Yes, I remember Salvage 1. Not to mention Robert Heinlein's The Man Who Sold The Moon. I'm pretty sure something like that will happen eventually: Private enterprise, rather than government and mlitary, will find the motive and means to go back to the moon.

 

So... someone better start working on guidelines for lunar caching.

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Yes, I remember Salvage 1. Not to mention Robert Heinlein's The Man Who Sold The Moon. I'm pretty sure something like that will happen eventually: Private enterprise, rather than government and mlitary, will find the motive and means to go back to the moon.

 

So... someone better start working on guidelines for lunar caching.

It's already been done.

 

http://www.tvacres.com/spacecraft_vulture.htm

 

It's on the Internet so it must be true! :laughing::anibad:

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