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Thoughts on playgrounds?


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I understand what you are saying, but do you realize that (quote snipped)

is exactly what a pedophile would say too? (I assume) :huh:

 

Well, perhaps, but what other option do I have? The OP sounded like he essentially lost a staring contest with the angry mom, and when he couldn't find the obvious proof he needed (the actual cache) tried to high-tail it out of there. Personally I think THAT behaviour might rouse more suspicion.

 

I used to work at a well-known franchise hardware store in Canada called Canadian Tire. One thing I learned was how to use their computer terminals for price and stock checks and even to see when an item is about to go on sale. I no longer work there, but occasionally when nobody's looking I have looked up items. Once I was studying the screen so intently I didn't even notice a clerk come up to me and ask, "Can I help you?" I found myself mumbling "Uh.. just.. looking at something...", turning away and briskly walking off, without even thinking about. In my guilt at being caught, all of that just came automatically.

 

Act like that in a school yard and you will be sure to get the cops called on you.

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Well, perhaps, but what other option do I have? The OP sounded like he essentially lost a staring contest with the angry mom, and when he couldn't find the obvious proof he needed (the actual cache) tried to high-tail it out of there. Personally I think THAT behaviour might rouse more suspicion.

 

 

I agree, it put him in a no win situation. Not sure that even if he had found the cache that it would have made a difference. If someone is heck bent on thinking your suspicious, nothing's going to change their mind. Especially an ammo can that the mystery person just supposedly "found" [church lady] how conveeeenient [/church lady].

 

That's why I think the cache hider did the smart thing by changing the counting stages and doesn't put his fellow cacher in that situation.

Edited by Team Smokey
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I understand what you are saying, but do you realize that

 

 

I can't say I'd really ever thought about this before. In the story recounted above, if it had been me, and the mom was giving me the Eye, I would probably have immediately pointed to the mom and told the kids, "You need to go back to your mom now, okay?" And probably keep on searching the grounds. Make it obvious that's what I'm doing (check GPS often). Make it CLEAR that I'm not at all interested in the little kids at the park. I'd probably explain to everyone up front what I was doing, not that it would necessarily help, but better to be open about things...

 

 

is exactly what a pedophile would say too? (I assume) :)

 

I don't think that's what a pedophile (or other person with an illegal interest in kids) would be all that likely to say....

 

However, relating back to the story of the two who got "busted" (flat tire and all that), the story they chose to tell was EXACTLY the sort of thing that such persons often choose - in fact, it's close to the example that's most frequently used in "Stranger Danger" education, which is someone asking for help finding a lost dog.

So it's not at all surprising that they got the reaction they did.

 

In any case, IMO flat-out lying to anyone - regardless of age - is not a good policy. Making up a Big Stupid Lie, with no basis in reality (there aren't any snakes in the U.S. big enough to eat dogs), and expecting that just because you're telling it to kids it's O.K., is, well.. Stupid.

For all the lie-teller knew, the kids might just have had a lesson in school about local snakes, or one of the kids might think snakes are cool and have known all about them**... not to mention not realizing that the kids would tell the MOMS what the men in the woods had said, and it would immediately set of alarm bells.

 

**Even very young kids can know a LOT about something that fascinates them.

 

And I agree about being up front. However, if I were being eyed up in a situation like that, I'd think I'd walk over and talk to the *adults* rather than go on searching. E.g. something like "A friend of mine and I are playing a game with our GPS units, and he hid something in the woods for me to try and find. I didn't realize it was right next to a playground until I got here - I hope we haven't scared you! "

Their reaction would determine whether or not I continued the search.

 

Getting back to the more general subject, I've found a couple of caches that were *near* playgrounds, but where the playgrounds are only one area of a public park open to all.

I don't have a issue with caches like that, other than the obvious fact that searching works better during times that there aren't a lot of kids (with nearby affliated adults) there. However, I wouldn't think it appropriate to put the cache ON the playground.

 

And if I were male, I would be even MORE inclined to confine searching for such caches to during school hours, early in the morning, or (if findable in the dark) at night.

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And if I were male, I would be even MORE inclined to confine searching for such caches to during school hours, early in the morning, or (if findable in the dark) at night.

"One Adam Twelve, One Adam Twelve, investigate suspicious person at elementary school playground- caller states suspect is hiding (drugs, bomb) or (waiting for children to get out of school)." :)

Edited by Confucius' Cat
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And if I were male, I would be even MORE inclined to confine searching for such caches to during school hours, early in the morning, or (if findable in the dark) at night.

"One Adam Twelve, One Adam Twelve, investigate suspicious person at elementary school playground- caller states suspect is hiding (drugs, bomb) or (waiting for children to get out of school)." :)

 

Please re-read my post.

 

I clearly stated that I was referring to looking for caches which are placed near playgrounds at multi-use public parks, not ones which are near or next to school playgourounds. Public parks generally aren't used by school-age kids during the hours I specified, except during the summer.

Playgrounds which are also used by parents with pre-schoolers will be easier to search near early in the morning, if daylight's needed.

Edited by cimawr
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Lots of caches around here at public park playgrounds. I will always skip them if I am alone and there are any kids in the area. If the family or just one of my sons is with me then it becomes perfect cover for the search. My son has eagle eyes for any slide that comes into view of his car window for even a fraction of a second!

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This has been a very interesting thread as I have been contemplating starting a series of caches, specifically on NON-SCHOOL playgrounds. I often have no choice but to cache with my 3yo who loves playgrounds. He's not nearly as interested in caching as in sliding, so I rejoice when I see that a cache is near a playground.

 

I had thought that a playground series would be fun for those of us who cache with kids and that a playground would be a nice reward for kids, moreso than an ammo can or a film container.....

 

Now I don't know what to think about continuing... I have just started typing the listing for the first one, none have been published or listed or anytyhing yet...

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That's funny you brought this up. We were just recently looking for a cache that was hidden on a playground and while looking for it we were disscussing what it must look like to passerbys. :) .Thankfully no children were there at the time. But I was wondering if my husband and father were there without my mom and I, would they be taken for pedophiles? :) . I like playground caches myself but it does make one wonder.

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This has been a very interesting thread as I have been contemplating starting a series of caches, specifically on NON-SCHOOL playgrounds. I often have no choice but to cache with my 3yo who loves playgrounds. He's not nearly as interested in caching as in sliding, so I rejoice when I see that a cache is near a playground.

 

I had thought that a playground series would be fun for those of us who cache with kids and that a playground would be a nice reward for kids, moreso than an ammo can or a film container.....

 

Now I don't know what to think about continuing... I have just started typing the listing for the first one, none have been published or listed or anytyhing yet...

 

As long as they are on non-school grounds, I don't see why you shoul feel hesitant about placing these caches. There is nothing wrong with ANYBODY being in the general vicinity of playgrounds no matter what some over protective mother may think. If it is public land, the public has a right to be on it.

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You know, perhaps we need all need to go out and play a bit more...

 

I'm in my forties, and I still go to playgrounds sometimes and sit in the swings and drag my toes on the ground, and just enjoy the day and being alive and watching the chipmunks scurry around.

 

It never occurred to me to worry what people were thinking about my being there.

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You know, perhaps we need all need to go out and play a bit more...

 

I'm in my forties, and I still go to playgrounds sometimes and sit in the swings and drag my toes on the ground, and just enjoy the day and being alive and watching the chipmunks scurry around.

 

It never occurred to me to worry what people were thinking about my being there.

 

I, likewise.

 

In my 50's and I do church camp and youth activities. I go to playgrounds sometimes (generally with my daughter. though, and those days are rapidly fading as she is in college now), and get the swing level with the top bar sometimes. (I even hang upside down from the silly things sometimes) :huh:

 

I don't particularly care what people think, either. But I am acutely aware of what it MIGHT look like and I make sure I take precautions to minimize my exposure to false accusations. Like not going anywhere alone with a kid that ain't mine.

 

Got temporary custody of my granddaughter a few days ago. We'll see you on the playground- maybe we'll hunt a few caches together. <_<<_<:huh:;)

 

"So let the children play Inside your heart always

And death you will defy

'Cause your youth will never die" - Creed "Never Die"

 

If you feel like you're getting old, give it a try! :huh:

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As long as they are on non-school grounds, I don't see why you shoul feel hesitant about placing these caches. There is nothing wrong with ANYBODY being in the general vicinity of playgrounds no matter what some over protective mother may think. If it is public land, the public has a right to be on it.

You're right. The cache I want to place is a favorite park/playground of me and my family and I'd love to bring cachers there even if it's just for the little ones to get a chance to play...

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But then there are the "soccer moms".

 

The "soccer mom" is the most despised of species (to me). Their little precious can do no wrong. Their little precious is always "cheated" or "overlooked" or "benched" or "forgotten" or in some way discriminated against and the world is "unfair", but only to "little precious".

 

The "soccer mom" is the quintesential overprotective meddler. To the "soccer mom", every adult at a playground without a child of their own is a filthy child molester (at best). "What are you doing here"?, asks the ever vigilant "soccer mom". That is when you know you're "in for it".

 

I like to deal with "soccer moms" as little as possible, and "soccer moms" that complain to the police are even less on my favourites list.

 

Even though doing nothing wrong, I am hesitant to do a cache search near a playground. It just looks too suspicious.

 

For an adult to play on the swings is not nearly as suspicious as one that goes around looking in every little nook whilst trying to pretend they are not looking for something, or pretending to be the "playground equipment inspector" in an unfamiliar town.

 

So take a kid with you to hunt the playground caches, that makes it "all better, now" *kiss*. :o

Edited by Confucius' Cat
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For what it's worth, the caches I am planning on hiding will not be ON the playground equipment. They will be near the equipment (just close enough that the little kids with them can play while the parents look for the cache) and will have explicit spoiler hints encrypted in the cache listing to avoid detection and suspicion a much as possible.

 

--Kristin (the future soccer mom as soon as the 3.5yr old is old enough) :o

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Good thinking. I still haven't published the cache yet (lost my eXplorist this weekend, but that's another story) and am contemplating other things in lieu of the playground series....

 

The standard of cache placement seems very high here in Savannah compared to what I see complained about here in the forums and I want to do my part to help keep that standard high.

Edited by parker313
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I don't have a problem with it. I too have a playground cache, only my cache is located right on the playground equipment. I do beleive that geocaching and children go hand in hand. That is why I placed this cache. So that children who may get bored caching at times, have a chance to play, and cache at the same time.

 

Here is a link to my cache------> NEMESIS #9 Playing Games (with your mind)

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Fascinating discussions. I love it.

 

By the way, cimawr had the best answer, in my opinion, when he mentions immediately talking to the suspicious mom about what he was doing on the playground. Full disclosure and addresses the immediate concern. As a guy specifically trained to work with kids (and both avoid the appearances of evil as well as actively address anything I see that looks suspicious) I should have known better.

 

I would go ahead and put out the playground cache series. Nothing wrong with it. If you have plenty of "warnings" (that makes it sound so negative... but at least make it clear that it's a public park, there could be kids, use reasonable judgement, etc) then the finders can make their own judgements. If they have kids to bring, they'll bring them. If not, they'll seek during times when nobody's around. People around here seem to love caching in the rain just for the fact that no muggles are around.

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But then there are the "soccer moms".

 

The "soccer mom" is the most despised of species (to me). Their little precious can do no wrong. Their little precious is always "cheated" or "overlooked" or "benched" or "forgotten" or in some way discriminated against and the world is "unfair", but only to "little precious".

 

The "soccer mom" is the quintesential overprotective meddler. To the "soccer mom", every adult at a playground without a child of their own is a filthy child molester (at best). "What are you doing here"?, asks the ever vigilant "soccer mom". That is when you know you're "in for it".

 

I like to deal with "soccer moms" as little as possible, and "soccer moms" that complain to the police are even less on my favourites list.

 

Even though doing nothing wrong, I am hesitant to do a cache search near a playground. It just looks too suspicious.

 

For an adult to play on the swings is not nearly as suspicious as one that goes around looking in every little nook whilst trying to pretend they are not looking for something, or pretending to be the "playground equipment inspector" in an unfamiliar town.

 

So take a kid with you to hunt the playground caches, that makes it "all better, now" *kiss*. :(

 

I am not sure how to apply a name, if it can be done, to the over-protective extremist parents, but don't think soccer-mom (or dad) is it.

 

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Soccer mom

In North American social, cultural and political discourse, soccer mom (and less used soccer dad for the male equivalent) refers broadly to a demographic group of women with school-age children. In general, the term "soccer mom" refers to the concept of American post-feminist motherhood as an amalgam of traditional domestic values with modern feminism (1960s-1980s), and is associated with modern material conveniences such as the SUV and cell phone. A soccer mom is typically imagined as upper middle class, probably college-educated, most often suburban or exurban, and typically white.

 

The "soccer mom" typically indicates a single income family, where the husband works while the wife is a homemaker. Since the 1980s, two incomes are widely considered to be "requirement" of the typical working class family in the U.S., and in this context single incomes symbolize both affluence and a disconnect from the working and lower middle classes.

 

The term can carry pejorative connotations, where the soccer mom may denote a woman who is aloof and has little responsibility or occupation, other than providing basic transportation for her children. In feminist circles, the soccer mom may refer to a woman who has given up on a promising and successful career, particularly after having some early aspirations and achievements. In this context this may carry the meaning of someone of diminished individual character. However, the word is not entirely negative, those described as soccer moms sometimes take pride in the term as affirmation that they are dedicated to providing attention, recreation and positive social contact for their children.

 

I was a single father with custody of three boys for eleven years and did my share of the soccer-dad thing, active in my church youth groups and a Boy Scout leader for ten of those years. The person you describe as a soccer-mom was, in my experience, rare.

 

Acknowledged, times have changed a bit since then, but not that much outside of the media. In my daily affairs, except for airports, I can't see that much if any recent change affects me or my neighbors.

 

I posted earlier in this thread that I have been accosted by moms and police at playgrounds, but a basic "what are you up to?" truthfully answered resolved all fears.

 

After reading this thread my opinion hasn't changed. I wouldn't walk into a playground where kids were present alone, but might with a group. As has been mentioned by others in this thread, perhaps going when kids aren't around, being open and not evasive, going when its raining or at night might resolve a lot of these confrontation fears.

 

Ed

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Fascinating discussions. I love it.

 

 

It is nice to have an actual DISCUSSION, innit? :(

 

 

By the way, cimawr had the best answer, in my opinion, when he mentions immediately talking to the suspicious mom about what he was doing on the playground. Full disclosure and addresses the immediate concern. As a guy specifically trained to work with kids (and both avoid the appearances of evil as well as actively address anything I see that looks suspicious) I should have known better.

 

 

Heh. I think you may have missed the very last bit of my post, where I said "if I were male".... purely as a point of note, I'm a 40-something female.

 

But regardless of gender, I'd most likely handle it that way, especially because I *have* worked with kids (co-taught a children's judo class for years, and helped homeschool my sister's kids), and am familiar both with the "stranger danger" issue and with dealing with all sorts of parents.

In a more general way, I've always found that a honest, direct approach to *most* "sticky" situations tends to work best- you don't have to give all the details to be forthright about something.

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I would go ahead and put out the playground cache series. Nothing wrong with it. If you have plenty of "warnings" (that makes it sound so negative... but at least make it clear that it's a public park, there could be kids, use reasonable judgement, etc) then the finders can make their own judgements. If they have kids to bring, they'll bring them. If not, they'll seek during times when nobody's around. People around here seem to love caching in the rain just for the fact that no muggles are around.

Well, unfortunately, I lost my GPSr this weekend so the cache is postponed indefinitely. I'd started writing it up before I got the coords.

 

Hopefully my GPSr will find its way home (or I can get a new one quickly) and will get the coords locked in and get it up for review and then published. (It'll be GCYAKK)

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But then there are the "soccer moms".

 

The "soccer mom" is the most despised of species (to me). Their little precious can do no wrong. Their little precious is always "cheated" or "overlooked" or "benched" or "forgotten" or in some way discriminated against and the world is "unfair", but only to "little precious".

 

The "soccer mom" is the quintesential overprotective meddler. To the "soccer mom", every adult at a playground without a child of their own is a filthy child molester (at best). "What are you doing here"?, asks the ever vigilant "soccer mom". That is when you know you're "in for it".

 

I like to deal with "soccer moms" as little as possible, and "soccer moms" that complain to the police are even less on my favourites list.

 

Even though doing nothing wrong, I am hesitant to do a cache search near a playground. It just looks too suspicious.

 

For an adult to play on the swings is not nearly as suspicious as one that goes around looking in every little nook whilst trying to pretend they are not looking for something, or pretending to be the "playground equipment inspector" in an unfamiliar town.

 

So take a kid with you to hunt the playground caches, that makes it "all better, now" *kiss*. :(

 

I am not sure how to apply a name, if it can be done, to the over-protective extremist parents, but don't think soccer-mom (or dad) is it.

 

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Soccer mom

In North American social, cultural and political discourse, soccer mom (and less used soccer dad for the male equivalent) refers broadly to a demographic group of women with school-age children. In general, the term "soccer mom" refers to the concept of American post-feminist motherhood as an amalgam of traditional domestic values with modern feminism (1960s-1980s), and is associated with modern material conveniences such as the SUV and cell phone. A soccer mom is typically imagined as upper middle class, probably college-educated, most often suburban or exurban, and typically white.

 

The "soccer mom" typically indicates a single income family, where the husband works while the wife is a homemaker. Since the 1980s, two incomes are widely considered to be "requirement" of the typical working class family in the U.S., and in this context single incomes symbolize both affluence and a disconnect from the working and lower middle classes.

 

The term can carry pejorative connotations, where the soccer mom may denote a woman who is aloof and has little responsibility or occupation, other than providing basic transportation for her children. In feminist circles, the soccer mom may refer to a woman who has given up on a promising and successful career, particularly after having some early aspirations and achievements. In this context this may carry the meaning of someone of diminished individual character. However, the word is not entirely negative, those described as soccer moms sometimes take pride in the term as affirmation that they are dedicated to providing attention, recreation and positive social contact for their children.

 

I was a single father with custody of three boys for eleven years and did my share of the soccer-dad thing, active in my church youth groups and a Boy Scout leader for ten of those years. The person you describe as a soccer-mom was, in my experience, rare.

 

Acknowledged, times have changed a bit since then, but not that much outside of the media. In my daily affairs, except for airports, I can't see that much if any recent change affects me or my neighbors.

 

I posted earlier in this thread that I have been accosted by moms and police at playgrounds, but a basic "what are you up to?" truthfully answered resolved all fears.

 

After reading this thread my opinion hasn't changed. I wouldn't walk into a playground where kids were present alone, but might with a group. As has been mentioned by others in this thread, perhaps going when kids aren't around, being open and not evasive, going when its raining or at night might resolve a lot of these confrontation fears.

 

Ed

 

 

I think that the new term here is "helicopter parent" Non-sexist and describes many of my children's friend parents to a "T".

Edited by Girls Phind Squirrels
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Whoops! :o I actually did try to check, I even looked at photos in your profile gallery to see if I could discern... must have missed that post, though.. sorry :blink:

 

No worries. :) I'm used to it, since I've been posting for years in forums that are mostly male (gaming, computers, photography, judo/martial arts, and the like). Which, if you read my profile, is probably part of why you couldn't tell - all the activities and interests I have listed are either gender-neutral or predominately male, with the exception of dog agility. (Dog agility is predominately female, for some reason.)

 

What probably threw you WRT the photos is that the only humans in 'em (yes, I take far too many pictures of my dogs! :D ) are my S.O. and his son, taken on a caching run the three of us did together. I do most of my caching solo-with-dogs, he does most of his either solo and/or with one or both of his kids and/or one or both of their dogs; occasionally we combine.

Which, in a side-step, is one of the things I love about caching - it's not only a fun solo activity, but one that all four of us (or six to eight if you count dogs <G>) enjoy.

Edited by cimawr
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Four kids on the playground see us wandering about and, being kids, leave the playground, come up the trail and ask what we're up to.

Were the parents the LEAST concerned with the child's behavior??? These women had the nerver to call the police on you? Did you ask the officers if it was allowable to let your children wander off into the woods alone? I deal with children and parents every day on a regular basis. Security is a huge issue when ever children are involved. The truth is, all parents want security for their kids but very few of them want to deal with the hassles that it involves! Its easier to call the police than to teach the kids not to go into the woods to see strangers. Anyway. I would do a cache on a playground. I am female though and it probably makes a huge difference in perception. I don't think people should stop placing them but if people don't want to look for them they have a valid reason.

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Were the parents the LEAST concerned with the child's behavior??? These women had the nerver to call the police on you? Did you ask the officers if it was allowable to let your children wander off into the woods alone?

 

Erm - given that A, the kids could see the searchers from the playground, and B, the moms were right behind them, and from their reaction were apparently WATCHING the activity the entire time, I don't see how you can say they "let their children wander off... alone".

 

And given the ridiculous story the searchers chose to tell the kids, I don't think they were over-reacting in calling the cops. E.g. the initial story was so absurd that it would make anything else they said/did suspect, including the "story" about searching for something hidden.

Edited by cimawr
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And given the ridiculous story the searchers chose to tell the kids, I don't think they were over-reacting in calling the cops. E.g. the initial story was so absurd that it would make anything else they said/did suspect, including the "story" about searching for something hidden.

 

Kinda like Maxwell Smart.

 

"Would you believe..."

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I think that the new term here is "helicopter parent" Non-sexist and describes many of my children's friend parents to a "T".

 

As an educational professional, I must say, I agree.

I'm still trying to grasp this.

Is the "helicopter" referring to their "hovering" around the kids? Or is it a reference to transportation, like "hurry up, gotta fly- lunch at 12, bank at 2, meeting at 2, school's out at 3, soccer at 4, play practice at 5, gymnastics at 6... "?

 

Sorry for using the wrong word. I never looked up "soccer mom" but I thought I was clear that I meant those "parents" (gender neutral) that are grossly overprotective and meddling. I will still call them "soccer moms" until I find a better term. My family knows what I mean- and I don't talk about other (specific) people to anyone else.

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What's the general feeling about this? Should playgrounds be off limits for anything involving Geocaching?

 

Well since playgrounds are ususally in parks, for us it all depends how far away the cache is from the actual playground and if there are people there at the time we're about to hunt.

 

We won't look if the cache is close by and there are people there.

 

We will hunt for a cache if nobody is around no matter how close it is to the playground or if there is people there but the cache is nowhere near the playground.

 

I don't think playgrounds should be off limits since a lot of cachers have families with small childern. It's a good way to get out, find a cache and afterwards the kids can still have fun. Cachers without kids just have to use some common sense when it comes to looking or not looking for these types of caches.

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there are cachers of every age. if you don't want to do a cache, don't be rude to the owner. there are kids everywhere. I would gladly cache on a playground with or without my kids. Being female helps, but having the kids with me is even better. And I don't lie to whoever asks what I'm doing. I tell the truth. But one thing I can recommend doing is saying "go ask your parents permission first." that way, you a: get rid of them, and b: if the kids come back and then the parents yell at you for taking them "out of bounds" you can ask the parents if the kids asked permission. If they didn't, the kids are in more trouble than you.

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I cache wherever there is a cache hidden. If it's a playground, I go for it! I may try to look like I belong or whatever, but mostly, I'm too intent on finding the cache to look overly suspicious about "checking out the kids"...kids usually aren't under sticks on the ground or in a knot hole of a tree!

 

I don't try to find a cache that is right near a child (or an adult...we do practice stealth after all), if someone is present, I'll go after another and come back if there's time! That's common practice for me no matter WHO is in the area...or where the area IS!!

 

If I were to ever be approached, I'd tell the truth, what would be the reason to lie??? I have a GPS, I have a paper with cache info...I'm a cacher!! And no, I'd never go into a conversation with a small child while out on the search....why would I?? I've been in the woods when a group of kids came around...I ignored them, they ignored me...we were only around 20' from each other. They played and I searched while making sure they weren't watching me (don't want to be the reason a cache gets muggled)! Kids don't tend to strike up conversations with "grumpy strangers"...I'm not the welcome wagon, I don't have candy or anything that a child would be interested in!

 

IF a child were to come and wonder what I were doing, I would tell the kid to go ask for permission to be around me (as someone stated above)...OBVIOUSLY, a parent will not allow their child to play with strangers (at least not the caring parents). AND, if I were worried as to what a parent might be thinking, I would likely go and introduce myself and teach them about caching (if they care to listen)...might make a new cacher of that family!! I have done just that more than once!!

 

edit to add: place them where you feel comfortable, find them where you feel comfortable!!

Edited by Rockin Roddy
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I take them as they come, if there's a cache there I will hunt it!

 

As noted above, you don't wade in amongst the kids, but if a playground is empty I will certainly do it - found two in playgrounds this week, both at night.

 

I have done playgrounds in parks with families there - one notable time at a pavilion where they were holding a kid's birthday party! We walked up, introduced ourselves, explained the game and asked if they minded if we hunt it. They had fun watching us find it.

 

We did this at a park where there was a party on the balcony too - walked up and said "Y'all don't mind if we look under you do you?"

 

Stealth isn't really required, just judgment. So far as I know no cache I have ever revealed has been muggled shortly thereafter.

 

Maybe it's the comfortable time and place I was raised, or having six of my own, but I just don't fear being around kids or kids places.

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