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Couparangus

Canadian Geopub Quiz

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Mtn-Man is from Georgia? B)

 

How did he come to be BC's reviewer then?

 

And I think it's cache agent that I missed (though I'm not entirely sure of her domain - Out east somewhere anyway - I'll guess NB)

 

Yup! Your turn

 

I dont know why he is BCs reviewer.. maybe he is just the only one who applied for the job :ph34r:

Still missed one :huh:

 

Would it be "geoaware" that approves Earthcaches that was missed? B)

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Mtn-Man is from Georgia? B)

 

How did he come to be BC's reviewer then?

 

And I think it's cache agent that I missed (though I'm not entirely sure of her domain - Out east somewhere anyway - I'll guess NB)

 

Yup! Your turn

 

I dont know why he is BCs reviewer.. maybe he is just the only one who applied for the job :ph34r:

Still missed one :huh:

 

Would it be "geoaware" that approves Earthcaches that was missed? B)

Nope, another Canadian reviewer in Canada

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Since the 1 Millionth waypoint ID was recently issued

 

Of the major milestone waypoint IDs issued (i.e. 100K, 200K, 300K, etc.) only two of them have been outside of the United States - Which Two, and in which country/Countries are they in? For bonus points, Which one(s) is/are archived?

Is this the question in play now?

 

Here's what I have, getting the GC codes from FizzyCalc.

  • 100000 (GCH4VQ), active in Indiana, United States
  • 200000 (GCMFXH), archived in Texas, United States
  • 300000 (GCQVZB), active in Arizona, United States
  • 400000 (GCW715), active in Kentucky, United States
  • 500000 (GCZJ2Z), active in Netherlands
  • 600000 (GC12Y4R), active in New Hampshire, United States
  • 700000 (GC1696J), active in Pennsylvania, United States
  • 800000 (GC19M8C), active in Sachsen, Germany
  • 900000 (GC1D0A6), active in California, United States
  • 1000000 (GC1GBC0), active in Connecticut, United States

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Well, you are correct, but I guess JuicePig's question is still the active question. According to Cache-tech, I missed an answer

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go ahead GPS slug - TS's was the answer i was looking for - and in these forums that is what matters; not the correct answer!

 

Although i would still be interested in knowing who we all missed :rolleyes:

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Probably some really obscure reviewer who's published one cache in The Yukon in 2006 :ph34r:

Edited by Taoiseach

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No right answers yet, except for the fact that the x-axis is time. And Tethys C is in the ballpark for the y-axis.

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go ahead GPS slug - TS's was the answer i was looking for - and in these forums that is what matters; not the correct answer!

 

Although i would still be interested in knowing who we all missed :laughing:

 

:laughing: Who is it some please put me out of my misery..... :D

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go ahead GPS slug - TS's was the answer i was looking for - and in these forums that is what matters; not the correct answer!

 

Although i would still be interested in knowing who we all missed :laughing:

 

:laughing: Who is it some please put me out of my misery..... :D

 

Cachemex, the other reviewer for Québec (because Québec cachers are putting out too many caches for a lone reviewer to keep up :( )

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No right answers yet, except for the fact that the x-axis is time. And Tethys C is in the ballpark for the y-axis.

 

Judging from your clues, and not knowing squat about seismology, could I hazard a guess that the scale represents earthquake predicictions vs actual plate movement since 1850?

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No right answers yet, except for the fact that the x-axis is time. And Tethys C is in the ballpark for the y-axis.

 

Judging from your clues, and not knowing squat about seismology, could I hazard a guess that the scale represents earthquake predicictions vs actual plate movement since 1850?

 

Well I am glad that we konw who the reviewer is now... it was bugging me too!

 

My guess to the new question is that it looks like the Toronto skyline! :laughing:

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Here's a revised plot with a few more clues.

plot2a.png

 

Chinese earthquake May 12, 2008 Earthquake in Sichuan, China

 

is my best guess

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Time for more hints.

 

It's not anything seismic, it's just that the y-axis represents position. Sorry if I led you down the wrong path there. I would not want to be on any planet where the quakes last for hours and move you 70 metres. :)

 

So it's not about the ground moving, but this event did make the ground speak.

plot2b.png

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Another day, another hint.

 

You wouldn't be in the Geopub today if it weren't for this event.

plot2.png

 

The answer can be found on geocaching.com. You don't even need to look in any cache listings.

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Probably some really obscure reviewer who's published one cache in The Yukon in 2006 :rolleyes:

 

Got it!!!!! It's cachechisme. He is the missing reviewer.

 

OK, now back to your previously scheduled program. :santa::santa:

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Well I'd guess it something to do with Selective Availability and when it was turned off.

 

from http://geography.about.com

"If you take a look at your handheld or automobile Global Positioning System (GPS) unit today, you'll notice that it's much, much more accurate now than it was on May 1. The reason? U.S. President Bill Clinton ordered Selective Availability (SA) turned off at midnight May 1 (Coordinated Universal Time). Now, civilian GPS users around the world will no longer experience the up to 100 meter (approximate 300 feet) random errors that SA added to keep GPS a more powerful tool for the military. Today, GPS units are accurate to within 20 meters (approximately 60 feet); although in good conditions, units should display an error of less than 10 meters."

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Probably some really obscure reviewer who's published one cache in The Yukon in 2006 :rolleyes:

 

Got it!!!!! It's cachechisme. He is the missing reviewer.

 

OK, now back to your previously scheduled program. :(;)

 

Nope - I got cachechisme - It was cachemex the other Quebec reviewer

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Well I'd guess it something to do with Selective Availability and when it was turned off.

 

from http://geography.about.com

"If you take a look at your handheld or automobile Global Positioning System (GPS) unit today, you'll notice that it's much, much more accurate now than it was on May 1. The reason? U.S. President Bill Clinton ordered Selective Availability (SA) turned off at midnight May 1 (Coordinated Universal Time). Now, civilian GPS users around the world will no longer experience the up to 100 meter (approximate 300 feet) random errors that SA added to keep GPS a more powerful tool for the military. Today, GPS units are accurate to within 20 meters (approximately 60 feet); although in good conditions, units should display an error of less than 10 meters."

Yep. That's right.

 

When the word went out that SA was being set to zero that night, I started collecting data to capture it happening. The blue line is the horizontal position error. The pink line is the estimated standard deviation, somewhat analogous to Garmin's EPE.

 

One of the things that the standard deviation is based on is the User Range Accuracy broadcast by each satellite, which gives the receiver an estimate of how much error there will be on the range measurement from the orbit and clock errors on that satellite.

 

So you can see that 4:00 UTC, new ephemerides were being used that had the artificial errors removed, but they didn't change the URAs in the broadcast right away. This was probably to give some time to verify that everything went right.

 

Then at 8:00 UTC, the new ephemerides at that time had the URAs lowered to reflect the new level of accuracy, and the estimated standard deviation snapped down. The next day, geocaching was born.

 

Here's a position plot of the same time.

scatter.png

 

On to you, Ducky.

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What a differance!

 

Ok simple one

 

Who manages the Global Positioning System for the US and where are they located?

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Easy!

 

The 50th Space Wing USAF out of Schriever Air Force Base in Colorado

 

If I am right I will post a question shortly.

 

Binrat

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Who is Conrad Hubert and why does he make Geocaching fun for us.

 

Binrat

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Who is Conrad Hubert and why does he make Geocaching fun for us.

 

Binrat

 

I can get that one!

 

Conrad Hubert invented the flashlight.... which helps us find caches in the night time. Without this wonderful invention we would be tripping over every barb wire fence, fallen tree, large rock and small stones, and huge vines that cross our path and we would never find our way to the cache... or else it would be with a few scratches and sprained ankles!

:laughing:

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Who is Conrad Hubert and why does he make Geocaching fun for us.

 

Binrat

 

I can get that one!

 

Conrad Hubert invented the flashlight.... which helps us find caches in the night time. Without this wonderful invention we would be tripping over every barb wire fence, fallen tree, large rock and small stones, and huge vines that cross our path and we would never find our way to the cache... or else it would be with a few scratches and sprained ankles!

:laughing:

 

None of you carry coal oil lanterns? :blink:

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Who is Conrad Hubert and why does he make Geocaching fun for us.

 

Binrat

 

I can get that one!

 

Conrad Hubert invented the flashlight.... which helps us find caches in the night time. Without this wonderful invention we would be tripping over every barb wire fence, fallen tree, large rock and small stones, and huge vines that cross our path and we would never find our way to the cache... or else it would be with a few scratches and sprained ankles!

:laughing:

 

None of you carry coal oil lanterns? :blink:

 

With the price of oil these days!!! :) I leave mine at home.... B)

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Who is Conrad Hubert and why does he make Geocaching fun for us.

 

Binrat

 

I can get that one!

 

Conrad Hubert invented the flashlight.... which helps us find caches in the night time. Without this wonderful invention we would be tripping over every barb wire fence, fallen tree, large rock and small stones, and huge vines that cross our path and we would never find our way to the cache... or else it would be with a few scratches and sprained ankles!

:laughing:

 

Because I am leaving to go away tomorrow afternoon, I am going to post my question without waiting for confirmation. I am positive my answer was correct so I will go ahead. That way I can ask the question and get the answer confirmed before I am gone for the weekend.

I want to ask a simple one so that it is answered quickly.... hopefully it is not a repeat....

 

The question:

Most of you already probably know where Canada's First Geocache (and still active) is. But do you know who was the FTF?

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Congratulations brendah, you are correct.

 

Binrat

 

Great... thanks Binrat.

 

Here is my question again:

 

The next question:

Most of you already probably know where Canada's First Geocache (and still active) is. But do you know who was the FTF?

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Congratulations brendah, you are correct.

 

Binrat

 

Great... thanks Binrat.

 

Here is my question again:

 

The next question:

Most of you already probably know what Canada's first geocache (which is still active) is. Do you know who was the FTF that same cache?

Edited by brendah

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a cacher named Rowsell

 

Yep... that is it. The cache was placed on June 28, 2000 by Ken Kane (aka eastriver). The cache was not located until October 5, 2000 by Rowsell (a team of 3 people). That was the only logged find of Rowsell although it is speculated that they probably re-named themselves. The next log was not until April 16, 2001 by Allyn420 (also only logging 1 find).

 

The still active cache info can be found at this link:

www.geocaching.com/seek/cache_details.aspx?guid=9c602896-18ba-4728-a878-eb0df941e7a8

 

Congrats Pushing Tin. Your turn.....

 

Happy Thanksgiving everyone!

Edited by brendah

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Thanx!!!!!!

 

Here we go with the next question:

 

What event (and what year) caused president Ronald Reagan to issue a directive making GPS freely available for civilian use as a common good?

Edited by Pushing Tin

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Thanx!!!!!!

 

Here we go with the next question:

 

What event (and what year) caused president Ronald Reagan to issue a directive making GPS freely available for civilian use as a common good?

 

In 1983, after Soviet interceptor aircraft shot down the civilian airliner KAL 007 in restricted Soviet airspace, killing all 269 people on board, U.S. President Ronald Reagan announced that the GPS system would be made available for civilian uses once it was completed

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Thanx!!!!!!

 

Here we go with the next question:

 

What event (and what year) caused president Ronald Reagan to issue a directive making GPS freely available for civilian use as a common good?

 

In 1983, after Soviet interceptor aircraft shot down the civilian airliner KAL 007 in restricted Soviet airspace, killing all 269 people on board, U.S. President Ronald Reagan announced that the GPS system would be made available for civilian uses once it was completed

 

Must've been too easy.... Take it away Stagunner

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Everyone uses the term "TRIANGULATION"so frequently, but this method of determining ones location is not used by GPS

 

So, which method of calculation does your GPSr use to compute it's location and why is it different from Triangulation

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Everyone uses the term "TRIANGULATION"so frequently, but this method of determining ones location is not used by GPS

 

So, which method of calculation does your GPSr use to compute it's location and why is it different from Triangulation

Trilateration - it uses distance rather than angles to triangulate..er, I mean trilaterate, the position.

Edited by Cedar Grove Seekers

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Rome, Tokyo, & London?

Rome is indeed correct. Its location was chosen for the fact it has seven hills.

 

Tokyo and London are not correct.

 

I am aware of four such cities, and will reveal the following:

 

- one is related to Rome and also was selected specifically because it has seven hills

- another is in the bible (and not Babylon which no longer exists)

- another is on the Iberian Peninsula

 

Of course there may be others that I am not aware of.

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