Jump to content

Finding a grave?


Guest Quinnow
Followers 0

Recommended Posts

Guest Quinnow

Heres a morbid one for you perhaps...I like to do some minor history research of my area and I find that some of the best ways to do so are in cemetarys. There is a web site called "findagrave.com" that has listing and locations of most famous people in the world (if they are dead)Well anyways Here in rochester, ny we have a few famous generals from the civil war times as well as what they believe to be "jack the ripper".

A while back a person e-mailed me and asked if I knew the exact location of a grave in a area cemetary and I was unable to help other than the lot # which was huge!, But now maybe I can give long/lat to show the location, they'll just need to get a gps.

There are people that travel all over the country to find graves of famous people. check out that site!...strange!

 

------------------

Quinn Stone

Rochester, NY.14616

www.Navicache.com

Link to comment
Guest Moun10Bike

It's funny that you mention this, because I just came back from a trip to Guildford, England. It's the town where Lewis Carroll is buried. I asked a number of locals where I could find the grave, and no one could tell me. Finally, I found a tourist map that showed the graveyard, and then journeyed to that location. It took some searching, but I finally found the grave (there are signs to the grave there, but we approached from the opposite direction and we didn't see them until after we had found the spot). The whole time, I was thinking how much easier the whole thing would have been if I just had a waypoint! Of course, I made sure to mark the spot on the GPS for next time! icon_smile.gif

Link to comment
Guest Moun10Bike

It's funny that you mention this, because I just came back from a trip to Guildford, England. It's the town where Lewis Carroll is buried. I asked a number of locals where I could find the grave, and no one could tell me. Finally, I found a tourist map that showed the graveyard, and then journeyed to that location. It took some searching, but I finally found the grave (there are signs to the grave there, but we approached from the opposite direction and we didn't see them until after we had found the spot). The whole time, I was thinking how much easier the whole thing would have been if I just had a waypoint! Of course, I made sure to mark the spot on the GPS for next time! icon_smile.gif

Link to comment
Guest Quinnow
Guest Quinnow
Guest Quinnow

Mount10bike...I think we just created another sport...the tough part would be digging up the logbook though.

But this would be cool for those people that like to scribe(copy) gravestones.

We have a cemetary here that is about 2 miles squared and over 200 years old.

People use it for the paved trails to bike, jog and walk through all day long. could be a good spot for one of those altoid caches, maybe put it on "jack the rippers" gravesite and log the location...after all, I dont think he'd complain!

 

------------------

Quinn Stone

Rochester, NY.14616

www.Navicache.com

 

[This message has been edited by Quinnow (edited 03-20-2001).]

Link to comment
Guest Moun10Bike

While I was in England, I really wanted to place a cache. I thought it would be cool to place a "Carroll Cache," one close to Lewis Carroll's grave and house (which is located less than a mile from the gravesite). The problem was that I couldn't find a good spot to do so. The country (i.e. wild space) in England is currently shut off because of the foot and mouth disease epidemic, and the city parks are for the most part small and manicured (i.e. any cache placed would be quickly found by maintenance staff and likely removed). I thought about the graveyard, but it too was manicured. Plus, I thought that it might be inappropriate to place a cache in such a site. Some might find it offensive or disrespectful, and graveyards are usually private property. Any thoughts on a way to do this that wouldn't offend people?

Link to comment
Guest Markwell

When I go, I think I'll have a cylinder bored into my headstone, with enough room for a cache - then I'll have my surviving relatives post the cache on the website.

 

Call it "Final Wish" cool.gif

Link to comment
Guest cjdoyle

quote:
Originally posted by Moun10Bike:

I thought about the graveyard, but it too was manicured. Plus, I thought that it might be inappropriate to place a cache in such a site. Some might find it offensive or disrespectful, and graveyards are usually private property. Any thoughts on a way to do this that wouldn't offend people?


 

What about a virtual cache? Place coordinates on the website to a person's grvestone, etc. Have them log it on the website.

Link to comment
Guest Quinnow

I don't see any prblem leaving a cache (small) in a graveyard, but thats just me. And I also think thats a great idea about leaving the location of someone famous or a certain marker name to find, then you could take a digital pix of yourself next to it and post it on the site.Then you could get points for each one found, maybe even higher points if you dig the guy up and get a pix with him!....nahhh, better stick to just the markers themselves.

 

------------------

Quinn Stone

Rochester, NY.14616

www.Navicache.com

Link to comment
Guest Moun10Bike

quote:
Originally posted by cjdoyle:

What about a virtual cache? Place coordinates on the website to a person's grvestone, etc. Have them log it on the website.


 

That would be ideal if it wasn't so easy to determine whose gravestone it is ahead of time, as you can using findagrave.com. With the Carroll grave, for example, you only have to look up Guildford and know whose grave you are looking for. I suppose you could use a "normal" person instead, but that probably wouldn't be as exciting for people.

Link to comment
Guest Moun10Bike

quote:
Originally posted by Quinnow:

I don't see any prblem leaving a cache (small) in a graveyard, but thats just me


 

I tend to think along the same lines -- I don't see the offense if you maintain respect for the setting while you are there. However, I know that doing so would be deemed offensive by others -- even my coworker was discouraging me as we were discussing the possibility while in the graveyard.

Link to comment
Guest Quinnow

OK then...how bout this!

I would have to say that my moms grave is family property, thus if I had mom watch over my cache what harm could that be?

 

Mom...if you can see this I meant no disrespect!

 

------------------

Quinn Stone

Rochester, NY.14616

www.Navicache.com

Link to comment
Guest Cape Cod Cache

I think messing about in graveyards is a bit in poor taste. I have 300 year old stones in my town. No rubbings are alowed. But a pix next to a stone of historical significance is fine by me. Check put 'Organized Geocaching'

Link to comment
Guest Quinnow

In my area the city does tours of two cemetarys due to the history behind so many of the graves such as Susan B anthony, "jack the ripper", buffalo bills Family and so forth. There are bikers, joggers and hikers all over the cemetarys. And I as well agree that etchings from a very old stone should not be done as to harm it.

quote:
Originally posted by Cape Cod Cache:

I think messing about in graveyards is a bit in poor taste. I have 300 year old stones in my town. No rubbings are alowed. But a pix next to a stone of historical significance is fine by me. Check put 'Organized Geocaching'


 

 

------------------

Quinn Stone

Rochester, NY.14616

www.Navicache.com

Link to comment
Guest Quinnow

I knew you guys would like that site!...uhhh, you didn't dig al up and plant a jelly packet on him did you?

quote:
Originally posted by kbraband:

FindAGrave is great. I checked out the listing for the cemetary where Al Capone is buried in Chicago. The place is crawling with dead gangsters, plus the grave of at least one saved soul -- Cardinal Joseph Bernardin. http://www.findagrave.com/cemeteries/85.html


 

 

------------------

Quinn Stone

Rochester, NY.14616

www.Navicache.com

Link to comment

the appeal. Two problems though;

1. How to disguise a cache as a jar of faded plastic flowers?, and

2. How to get the residents permission?!

Link to comment
Guest jeremy

You may not want to do that, since caretakers tend to clean up vases and such at graveyards. It's also sort of dececration, turning a graveyard into a game, but that's my own personal opinion.

 

If you want to do something cache related in a graveyard, you could find an individual headstone and ask the geocacher what it says to prove they've been there.

 

Out of curiosity, what would motivate you to place one there? Is there a great view of the surrounding area?

 

Jeremy

Link to comment
Guest colink

Okay Folks, Here's a thought. I have six film containters with my wifes ashs in them. I put them in a cache, each of them numbered 1 thru 6. The seekers find the cache, log the date and time. Then I ask that they take the film container to a place that they find suitable for their beliefs and spread them. Then log the site here at Geocache.com. Now I realize that some may find this uncomfortable, but others may understand. All I ask is that it be done with thought and reverance.

 

Collin

Link to comment
Guest JasonW

quote:
Originally posted by colink:

Okay Folks, Here's a thought. I have six film containters with my wifes ashs in them. I put them in a cache, each of them numbered 1 thru 6. The seekers find the cache, log the date and time. Then I ask that they take the film container to a place that they find suitable for their beliefs and spread them. Then log the site here at Geocache.com. Now I realize that some may find this uncomfortable, but others may understand. All I ask is that it be done with thought and reverance.

 

Collin


 

Others might find this a little strange, but a few years back I had a request in a similar vein from one of my schoolfriends' wives - he'd been killed in a road accident and that she wanted his schoolfriends to take his ashes and scatter them 'somewhere nice'.....

 

Well the remaining four of us that had been close friends with him, discussed the possibilities & justifications of doing it and eventually we agreed that we would do it and that we'd have to take his ashes somewhere he loved to go - after all it was his wife's wish for us to scatter his remains.

 

So we decided on one of his favourite hikes in the English Lake District along "High Street" - we each took a quarter of the ashes and set off for a weekend hiking and when we found the right spot we returned him to the elements from whence he came and in a spot he loved, overlooking Ullswater.

 

It sounds like a morbid thing to do, but we took him into his favourite Lakeland pub, had a fantastic weekend and it really felt like we were saying "goodbye" properly to him.

 

What's the point of the story above ? Well if that's what Colin wants for his wife's ashes then nobody should get on their moral high horse and decry him for his wishes.

 

Jason

Link to comment
Guest Quinnow

Whoa!...I'm not gonna touch the last two posts, though I see nothing wrong with it really. But getting back to graveyards and geocaches I don't see anything wrong with it at all. But to better make myself clear what i had intentions of was for the very old cemetarys and within sections where sites are aged well over 100 years. In many cemetarys you dont even need to be close to a grave to find a nice spot or location for a very small cache. One of our cemetarys has several areas where the closest grave is about 1000 feet away. also has park benches and guideway trails for history buffs.

But I do encourage that it was kept very low profile. Another idea would be a picture cache...Someone would post a gravesite of someone known in history or maybe a movie star or villain, you then would have to take a picture of the site with you next to it and post it on Geocaching.

 

Or lets say it is requested that you get some pocket change from the dead guy, you could dig him up take whatever coinage he has and place a billy bass in its place...ummm, ok lets forget that last part and stick with the pictures and very small out of the way caches.

 

------------------

Quinn Stone

Rochester, NY.14616

www.Navicache.com

 

[This message has been edited by Quinnow (edited 03-25-2001).]

Link to comment
Guest GraveGuy

Greetings...

 

I'm the creator of Find A Grave and I'm also into the GeoCache thing...I only have one planted (The Salt Flats PEZ Cache)...I've been thinking about planting caches in cemeteries, as well, but I know, based on my experience running the site for five years, that some people would take great offense...What about something like a 'flower cache' where you would mark a grave (famous or non-famous) and then everyone who found it would go and bring a flower or some other appropriate 'cemetery gift'...perhaps a disposable camera could be concealed in a nearby vase or something and a photo-log could be kept as well as the online log...?

 

I also keep trying to think of integrating my site into this whole hobby somehow...for example, there are hundreds of people adding their loved ones every day...say Joe in New York adds his grandmother in California, but he doesn't have a photo...I would LOVE to build up some kind of network of people who hunted down these stones, marked them with their GPS and then posted the photos online...then they could be 'marked' and they could turn into 'flower caches'...? Who knows...If any of you all have any good ideas, I'd love to see them posted here...

 

By the way, 'Cemetery' is spelled like that (all "e"s)...not 'Cemetary'...I made the same mistake for years...

 

Also...Find A Grave already has a good head start on the famous graves, listing over 1,000 coordinates for all sorts of famous graves...perhaps we could start something there...

 

-Jim

Link to comment
Guest Quinnow

Jim if for some reason you need some pictures of anything in the Rochester or upstate area, contact me and i'll do my best to send them to you via digital camera. I live in Rochester and travel the state quite a bit, and if near one would not mind to help out.

 

------------------

Quinn Stone

Rochester, NY.14616

www.Navicache.com

Link to comment
Guest echosgold

The history aspect of this is great. I recently returned from a trip to Death Valley. There was an old miner called Jean Lemoigne that was buried where he died, under the shade of a mesquite tree along with his horse. This took place early 1900's. Of course, the National Park Service does not want to publicize this and left its location off their maps. I found it on a topo, punched in the coordinates and found it no problem. Very interesting!

Link to comment

<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR><font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by colink:

Okay Folks, Here's a thought. I have six film containters with my wifes ashs in them. I put them in a cache, each of them numbered 1 thru 6. The seekers find the cache, log the date and time. Then I ask that they take the film container to a place that they find suitable for their beliefs and spread them. Then log the site here at Geocache.com. Now I realize that some may find this uncomfortable, but others may understand. All I ask is that it be done with thought and reverance.

 

Collin</font><HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

 

Others might find this a little strange, but a few years back I had a request in a similar vein from one of my schoolfriends' wives - he'd been killed in a road accident and that she wanted his schoolfriends to take his ashes and scatter them 'somewhere nice'.....

 

Well the remaining four of us that had been close friends with him, discussed the possibilities & justifications of doing it and eventually we agreed that we would do it and that we'd have to take his ashes somewhere he loved to go - after all it was his wife's wish for us to scatter his remains.

 

So we decided on one of his favourite hikes in the English Lake District along "High Street" - we each took a quarter of the ashes and set off for a weekend hiking and when we found the right spot we returned him to the elements from whence he came and in a spot he loved, overlooking Ullswater.

 

It sounds like a morbid thing to do, but we took him into his favourite Lakeland pub, had a fantastic weekend and it really felt like we were saying "goodbye" properly to him.

 

What's the point of the story above ? Well if that's what Colin wants for his wife's ashes then nobody should get on their moral high horse and decry him for his wishes.

 

Jason

 

What a stupid idea. How many of those canisters where opened by unsuspecting cachers thinking they were meant to be caches that people take and rehide/publish somewhere else? What are some people thinking???

Link to comment

Geocaching.com now considers cemeteries to be private property and you need permission to place a cache in one.

 

Some places in the United States, the reviewers ask you if you have explicit permission for a cemetery hide, but I'm going to say most Cemetery caches in America are under the assumption of permission policy. You know, the same way all those caches at Wal-Mart have permission. :ph34r:

 

I guess the point of this ancient thread was to bring up findagrave.com. Which is an excellent database, and yes, has millions of "regular" people listed there. You could make a page for any deceased loved ones of your own, for example. But all these years later, they still do not list GPS coordinates of graves, even as an option. They really need to get on the ball there, since the Original post 12 years ago, they've already missed both the "everybody has a car GPS" revolution and "everybody has a smartphone" revolution. :P

Link to comment

I'm going to have my ashes sealed in plactic attach a dog tag and make Travel bugs out of them. :surprise: I may call them "Here's the Captain" :laughing:

 

So who said you can't geocache forever.

 

Some of you may have heard of another location based game called "Highpointing". It's basically a U.S. game where the object is to climb to the highest point in all 50 U.S. States.

The original founder of the club passed away a few years ago and his family made up 50 containers with his ashes which were emptied by other highpointers at the highest points in each state.

Link to comment

<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR><font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by colink:

Okay Folks, Here's a thought. I have six film containters with my wifes ashs in them. I put them in a cache, each of them numbered 1 thru 6. The seekers find the cache, log the date and time. Then I ask that they take the film container to a place that they find suitable for their beliefs and spread them. Then log the site here at Geocache.com. Now I realize that some may find this uncomfortable, but others may understand. All I ask is that it be done with thought and reverance.

 

Collin</font><HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

 

Others might find this a little strange, but a few years back I had a request in a similar vein from one of my schoolfriends' wives - he'd been killed in a road accident and that she wanted his schoolfriends to take his ashes and scatter them 'somewhere nice'.....

 

Well the remaining four of us that had been close friends with him, discussed the possibilities & justifications of doing it and eventually we agreed that we would do it and that we'd have to take his ashes somewhere he loved to go - after all it was his wife's wish for us to scatter his remains.

 

So we decided on one of his favourite hikes in the English Lake District along "High Street" - we each took a quarter of the ashes and set off for a weekend hiking and when we found the right spot we returned him to the elements from whence he came and in a spot he loved, overlooking Ullswater.

 

It sounds like a morbid thing to do, but we took him into his favourite Lakeland pub, had a fantastic weekend and it really felt like we were saying "goodbye" properly to him.

 

What's the point of the story above ? Well if that's what Colin wants for his wife's ashes then nobody should get on their moral high horse and decry him for his wishes.

 

Jason

 

What a stupid idea. How many of those canisters where opened by unsuspecting cachers thinking they were meant to be caches that people take and rehide/publish somewhere else? What are some people thinking???

 

Back when this 12 year old thread was started geocachers generally didn't associate film canisters with cache containers.

Edited by briansnat
Link to comment

<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR><font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by colink:

Okay Folks, Here's a thought. I have six film containters with my wifes ashs in them. I put them in a cache, each of them numbered 1 thru 6. The seekers find the cache, log the date and time. Then I ask that they take the film container to a place that they find suitable for their beliefs and spread them. Then log the site here at Geocache.com. Now I realize that some may find this uncomfortable, but others may understand. All I ask is that it be done with thought and reverance.

 

Collin</font><HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

 

Others might find this a little strange, but a few years back I had a request in a similar vein from one of my schoolfriends' wives - he'd been killed in a road accident and that she wanted his schoolfriends to take his ashes and scatter them 'somewhere nice'.....

 

Well the remaining four of us that had been close friends with him, discussed the possibilities & justifications of doing it and eventually we agreed that we would do it and that we'd have to take his ashes somewhere he loved to go - after all it was his wife's wish for us to scatter his remains.

 

So we decided on one of his favourite hikes in the English Lake District along "High Street" - we each took a quarter of the ashes and set off for a weekend hiking and when we found the right spot we returned him to the elements from whence he came and in a spot he loved, overlooking Ullswater.

 

It sounds like a morbid thing to do, but we took him into his favourite Lakeland pub, had a fantastic weekend and it really felt like we were saying "goodbye" properly to him.

 

What's the point of the story above ? Well if that's what Colin wants for his wife's ashes then nobody should get on their moral high horse and decry him for his wishes.

 

Jason

 

What a stupid idea. How many of those canisters where opened by unsuspecting cachers thinking they were meant to be caches that people take and rehide/publish somewhere else? What are some people thinking???

 

Back when this 12 year old thread was started geocachers generally didn't associate film canisters with cache containers.

 

Ah yes. Those must have been wonderful times.

Link to comment

I'm going to have my ashes sealed in plactic attach a dog tag and make Travel bugs out of them. :surprise: I may call them "Here's the Captain" :laughing:

 

So who said you can't geocache forever.

 

Some of you may have heard of another location based game called "Highpointing". It's basically a U.S. game where the object is to climb to the highest point in all 50 U.S. States.

The original founder of the club passed away a few years ago and his family made up 50 containers with his ashes which were emptied by other highpointers at the highest points in each state.

 

Hey, why not go off topic, since this is a 12 year old thread bumped for who knows what reason. :laughing: I had no clue, but apparently he passed away in 2002. What a great idea. I have a whopping 3 highpoints, our own Mt. Marcy (yes, I climbed it in 1990, no kidding), and Indiana and Ohio, which are about 60 miles apart, and about as lame as they come. They both have Earthcaches, by the way. :)

Link to comment
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
Followers 0
×
×
  • Create New...