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Jadenegro01

Looking for tutorial on how to create an earth cache

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Is there a good resource that explains how to create a good earth cache? I found this source for educators but since I am not an educator and don't have a classroom most of it doesn't really apply. Looking for a source for just general people?

 

http://www.geosociety.org/earthcache/teacherGuide.htm

 

Did you check out the Help Center section about Earthcaches?

 

http://support.Groundspeak.com/index.php?pg=kb.chapter&id=51

 

 

B.

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Is there a good resource that explains how to create a good earth cache? I found this source for educators but since I am not an educator and don't have a classroom most of it doesn't really apply. Looking for a source for just general people?

 

http://www.geosociety.org/earthcache/teacherGuide.htm

 

Did you check out the Help Center section about Earthcaches?

 

http://support.Groundspeak.com/index.php?pg=kb.chapter&id=51

 

 

B.

 

I did see that. For example it tells me I need to create a lesson but I don't know how to build a lesson? So sort of looking for something that explains how to create a lesson which was when I found the materials for teachers with an example of how to teach to Colorado state requirements. That was kind of helpful but a little hard for to figure out how to apply it in a general sense.

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Thanks for asking Jadenegro01. Based on the Listing that you own, I'm guessing that you'll probably submit a Listing in my Reviewing Territory, so I'll just let you know the types of things I expect to see on a submission. Looking at your responses I get the feeling that you're making it more difficult than it needs to be.

 

First off , I'd recommend looking at the Guidelines posted on the GSA site. That's the document I reference a lot when I'm Reviewing.

 

The Help Center article that has been mentioned is a great resource when putting together a submission.

 

A "lesson plan" is a bit misleading. It really just boils down to what topic you choose to discuss in your Description, and if it's related to some nearby geologic feature. There are a multitude of State and Federal websites that discuss local geology, as well as various books that can be purchased or checked out from your local library (i.e. Roadside Geology series for instance).

 

After looking at the Description and determining that it is geology based, I look through the Logging Requirements, to make sure they meet the educational intent of the Guidelines, and are related to the topic in the Description.

 

Finally I check for permission from the Land Manager, which in the majority of cases will be required.

 

Let me know if you need anymore clarification.

Edited by geoawareUSA1

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I did see that. For example it tells me I need to create a lesson but I don't know how to build a lesson? So sort of looking for something that explains how to create a lesson which was when I found the materials for teachers with an example of how to teach to Colorado state requirements. That was kind of helpful but a little hard for to figure out how to apply it in a general sense.

 

Take a look at some recently published earthcaches. Doesn't matter where they are located, they should give a good idea of what is currently acceptable for earthcache "lessons" that need to be a part of the submission.

 

You can do that by using the Hide & Seek page, and searching for your state, and then just Earthcaches.

 

For example, here's a list of Earthcaches in Ontario, Canada, listed by most recent first:

 

http://www.geocaching.com/seek/nearest.aspx?state_id=69&ex=0&cFilter=c66f5cf3-9523-4549-b8dd-759cd2f18db8&children=n&sortdir=desc&sort=placed

 

Thanks, geoaware, for chiming in with your excellent advice.

 

 

B.

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I did see that. For example it tells me I need to create a lesson but I don't know how to build a lesson? So sort of looking for something that explains how to create a lesson which was when I found the materials for teachers with an example of how to teach to Colorado state requirements. That was kind of helpful but a little hard for to figure out how to apply it in a general sense.

 

Take a look at some recently published earthcaches. Doesn't matter where they are located, they should give a good idea of what is currently acceptable for earthcache "lessons" that need to be a part of the submission.

 

You can do that by using the Hide & Seek page, and searching for your state, and then just Earthcaches.

 

For example, here's a list of Earthcaches in Ontario, Canada, listed by most recent first:

 

http://www.geocaching.com/seek/nearest.aspx?state_id=69&ex=0&cFilter=c66f5cf3-9523-4549-b8dd-759cd2f18db8&children=n&sortdir=desc&sort=placed

 

Thanks, geoaware, for chiming in with your excellent advice.

 

B.

Wow you have tons of earth caches in Ontario! Thank you for the link. It looks like I have to figure out what a lesson is and then find diagrams to insert.

Edited by Keystone
fixed quote

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1. Find a good book or website that discusses interesting geography and geology in your area. Visit some of the sites you learn about in your preliminary research.

 

2. Pick a site that interests you. Make sure there isn't already a similar Earthcache nearby.

 

3. Learn more about the site by doing your own research. Consider contacting someone at your local university or community college who is an expert on that site, or that type of earth science.

 

4. Contact the owner or land manager of the site and tell them about your plan. Give them information about Earthcaching and a link if they want to learn more. Ask for permission to create an Earthcache.

 

5. Visit the site again. Explore the site, and brainstorm ideas for logging tasks. Test your ideas at the site. Find out if local schools have used your site for field trips and what kind of learning tasks they do on site - this can be a good source of ideas for tasks. Visit other Earthcaches and see what kinds of tasks they use.

 

4. Write your Earthcache listing in your own words. Don't plagiarize it. If you've enlisted the help of an expert, see if they wouldn't mind reviewing your write-up to make sure it's accurate. Include diagrams and links to additional resources.

 

5. Submit your listing. Follow the submission guidelines and include the contact information for the person who gave you permission. If the reviewer asks for you to change or add something, don't take it personally. The reviewer is there to help you get your Earthcache up and running. The reviewer is someone who loves Earthcaches and wants to see yours get published.

 

6. Once your listing is published, you must maintain it. Visit your site at least once a year to make sure it's still accessible and that the logging tasks are still viable. Monitor the logs and make sure that everyone who logs your Earthcache has visited the site and submitted reasonable responses to your logging tasks. Occasionally, you might get a fraudulent one or a lazy one, and you'll need to deal with that by asking the finder to clarify or revise a response. Sometimes you might need to delete a log.

 

7. Start researching your next Earthcache!

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Well you make it sound much easier than the educator handbook I was looking through :) Since earth caches aren't that common I haven't done very many of these and I don't know anyone who has created one. It's good to hear your advice. Thank you!

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I have recently published my own (1st) earth cache and it was accepted straight away,GC5AP82. The lesson is just what people might learn from visiting the sight and reading your log page for example mine was around the erosion and how it helped to create the island and the formation of the bridge. I had written permission from the national trust and included that in the message to the reviewer so they could see it. If it doesnt get approved straight away ask for help!

Good luck!!

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Additionally... In the US, I would recommend checking State web sites and seeing if there isn’t a Geological Survey. Many have educational based sections, also federal sites such as USGS and the National Park System. Another source may be Geological “Road Trip” type guides, try colleges and universities for this. Remember that your clientele will have a variety in age range as well as educational backgrounds. I prefer questions which lead to “observational” type answers. Let them tell you what they see… And as always, keep it simple…

After thought... If there is a local Earthcacher in your area ask if he/she would take a look at it prior to submittal. I do that for folks around here...

Edited by GEO WALKER

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Good recommendations above.

 

Other ideas:

 

Study the EarthCache.org Guidelines, for this is what the reviewer will be checking your listing against: http://community.geosociety.org/EarthCache/guidelines

 

Check the EarthCache.org FAQ, especially the part w/ resources and info sources:

http://community.geosociety.org/EarthCache/newitem6/faqs

 

And seek out a few more EarthCaches as examples. And look at other caches in the area where you plan to put yours, to avoid duplicating other information, and to get ideas of what types of concepts may not have been covered yet in that area.

 

Best wishes,

Matt D, GSA

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Still trying to figure this out. Is there a certain number of logging tasks that are required? Do the logging tasks need to ask people to demonstrate knowledge, analysis, synthesis, evaluation? I don't think I understand the goal.

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No, you don't need a certain number of logging tasks. If the location only lends itself to one good logging task then one is sufficient. Best are logging tasks that combine what people read in your text and see at the site. Thus don't ask how many benches are there or how wide the outcrop is but think of something that would strengthen the learning for the visitor at this site. And if your uncertain it always helps to talk to your reviewer. They tend to be nice and rock hounds :anibad:

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I think some of the best logging task are directly related to 'what makes the site awesome' or what you want visitors to learn.

 

For instance, if most of the rocks in a county are sedimentary, but the rocks at the EarthCache site are volcanic and laid down in a smooth layer, it's because there is/was a volcano there are some point. The logging task could try to get the visitor to recognize that.

 

Or- If there are a blue million fossils of shallow-ocean plants and creatures in clay-like shale halfway in some rocks, it could mean there was a major landslide just off-shore. For that matter, if you find rocks in the middle of a continent that have fossils of shallow-ocean plants and creatures it means the area was once under 30 feet of ocean.

 

Rocks tell the story of the history of the site. You can always get your visitors to find the 'evidence' that supports the story of that site.

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As a general rule of thumb I would say three logging tasks. Some go overboard and ask for too many.

As mentioned one or two can work if they are good. I don't count "who are the cachers you are submitting answers for" a logging task. That and a few like them are bookkeeping tasks for the cache owner.

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