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FEATURE REQUEST: Dog friendly caches?


Team Trevor
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Not sure if has ever been brought up, but we usually bring our dog Trevor on our cache hunts. Would be possible that when placing a cache there could be an option to select whether or not the cache is "dog friendly". Then maybe an icon or such could indicate so on the cache page. I know alot of other cachers bring there dogs with them. There have been a few caches that I've done that no dog would ever be able to do. Just a thought. Thanks

 

-jim

 

-Wake me in my dreams

-Tom Waits

 

[This message was edited by Jim, Kelly and Trevor on August 19, 2002 at 05:13 AM.]

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Heh... not having a dog, of course I think this idea is a little bit too much. Yes, it would be great if you could know ahead of time if you would be able to take your dog - but having a completely seperate special icon or indicator is a bit much, imho.

 

Little special requests like that could end up being trouble... special cache identifiers for handicapped accessable, child friendly, dog friendly, elderly friendly, woman accessable, etc... j/k about that woman remark, of course. icon_wink.gif

 

But really - that is an area of individual belief as well. I might have a crappy little tiny dog that couldn't go some places where a big black lab might be able to go. And vice versa, someone might label a cache dog-friendly because they have a massive offroad dog that can handle it, when my yippie little poodle would have a hard time. icon_smile.gif

 

--==< http://home.columbus.rr.com/rubbertoe >==--

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Heh... not having a dog, of course I think this idea is a little bit too much. Yes, it would be great if you could know ahead of time if you would be able to take your dog - but having a completely seperate special icon or indicator is a bit much, imho.

 

Little special requests like that could end up being trouble... special cache identifiers for handicapped accessable, child friendly, dog friendly, elderly friendly, woman accessable, etc... j/k about that woman remark, of course. icon_wink.gif

 

But really - that is an area of individual belief as well. I might have a crappy little tiny dog that couldn't go some places where a big black lab might be able to go. And vice versa, someone might label a cache dog-friendly because they have a massive offroad dog that can handle it, when my yippie little poodle would have a hard time. icon_smile.gif

 

--==< http://home.columbus.rr.com/rubbertoe >==--

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Lots of dogs here, too! There are even a few local caches that are specifically for dogs, such as Pooch's Prize and Tin Puppy that have toys and treats.

 

I don't think a special designation for dog-friendly caches makes sense because there are too many variables, not to mention the type and conditioning of the dog. However, you should be able to tell from the cache description and perhaps the logs what hunts your companions can likely do. Some cache descriptions warn that children are not recommended which could also be applied to dogs. As you get more caches under your belt, you'll get a feel for things to avoid. In general, most healthy dogs can handle terrain ratings of 3 or less--assuming the cache owner has accurately rated the terrain (a topic that has been discussed several times)!

 

My advice: do a little research for each cache, make your primary purpose to enjoy the outing and give your pets some exercise, and if the hunt proves too difficult for them then consider it reconnaissance and come back another time.

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As indicated, most everyone would have their own standard about what is a 'Dog Friendly' location. Probably a more useful idea would be a 'No Dogs' indicator on caches. Used to indicate that cache is located in area where dogs are not allowed. But since most dog owners also have their own interpretation of what 'No Dogs Allowed' means, namely that it would not apply to their dog if only you got to know him, I would agree that this feature would have limited benefit.

 

____________________________

The true traveler is he who goes on foot, and even then, he sits down a lot of the time.

- Colette

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quote:
Originally posted by Jim & Kelly:

There have been a few caches that I've done that no dog would ever be able to do.


 

Ok, out of genuine curosity, what caches have you been to that a dog couldn't do? I've taken my 6 lb. Papillion on lots of hunts, including some up several thousand foot elevation gains, hiking through the woods in the dark, and into the heart of bear country. He walks the whole way himself, with exception to creek crossings that are too deep for him.

The only hunts I've left him out of are those where I needed to ride a bike, strictly because he's too small to be able to keep up with me. A geocacher with a larger dog could have easliy brought theirs along.

So, what kind of caches do you have in NH that are that dog unfriendly?

 

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Friends don't let friends NOT geocache.

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quote:
Originally posted by skydiver:

Ok, out of genuine curosity, what caches have you been to that a dog couldn't do


 

I think the issue here is caches that are placed in areas that do not allow dogs.

 

There was a thread in this forum some time ago that discussed icons that could be used to ID caches that were dog friendly or not, wheelchair friendly or not, etc.

 

As I recall, Jeremy posted that these were in the works, but other issues were higher on the priority list.

 

These icons would be completely voluntary, but would certainly be useful when planning to take the pup on a day of caching.

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The problem where I live is that while NYC parks are very dog friendly - on and off leash(for some places), and its pretty dogs friendly up north, out east on Long Island the city and county parks don't let dog's it for the most part, period.

 

Hey Leatherman, my dog Buddy isn't Yippy but it caches out usually before we reach the cache. Is yours a girl, they might make a nice couple icon_wink.gif

 

Alan

 

10814_200.jpg

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The problem where I live is that while NYC parks are very dog friendly - on and off leash(for some places), and its pretty dogs friendly up north, out east on Long Island the city and county parks don't let dog's it for the most part, period.

 

Hey Leatherman, my dog Buddy isn't Yippy but it caches out usually before we reach the cache. Is yours a girl, they might make a nice couple icon_wink.gif

 

Alan

 

10814_200.jpg

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We have been bringing our dog Chi on caches since he was a puppy. We think he knows exactly what we are doing by now.

 

When we were on vacation in Colorado, we were going on a cache in the Pueblo Reservoir. We left him in the truck, since it was half a mile away. We rolled up the windows 3/4 of the way up. When we were signing the log, all of a sudden, here comes Chi, out of the blue! The dog managed to squeeze out of the window and find us at that far of a distance. We were all amazed. Even though the dog didn't listen, he must be addicted to geocaching like us! There has been times where he has been off of the leash in heavy wooded areas, and he would be sitting at the cache even before we arrived!

 

icon_smile.gif

 

[This message was edited by upinyachit on August 22, 2002 at 12:05 AM.]

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We have been bringing our dog Chi on caches since he was a puppy. We think he knows exactly what we are doing by now.

 

When we were on vacation in Colorado, we were going on a cache in the Pueblo Reservoir. We left him in the truck, since it was half a mile away. We rolled up the windows 3/4 of the way up. When we were signing the log, all of a sudden, here comes Chi, out of the blue! The dog managed to squeeze out of the window and find us at that far of a distance. We were all amazed. Even though the dog didn't listen, he must be addicted to geocaching like us! There has been times where he has been off of the leash in heavy wooded areas, and he would be sitting at the cache even before we arrived!

 

icon_smile.gif

 

[This message was edited by upinyachit on August 22, 2002 at 12:05 AM.]

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I guess this kind of feature would pertain more to whether or not dogs are allowed. Other than that prehaps its up to the discretion of whether or not a cacher should bring there dog. We have one of those pampered Shelties, and there has been a few caches I'm glad he didn't come.

332536_200.jpg

My Cacheing pooch!

 

-jim

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In Sonoma County (California, north of SF) many trails are off limits to dogs, mostly because people with horses don't like them (and people with horses generally have more money than those of us with mutts.) The state parks are also all off limits to canines.

I would love to see icons or lists for dogs, wheel chairs, boats, or any special interests.

 

Haicoole

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The cache hider should be considerate enough to list those conditions in their cache description.

Even if there were, say, check boxes for each one of these icons to appear on the cache page. The hider of a cache may not use all the appropriate icons for that cache location. I think that the hider should just be considerate enough to mention those conditions when making up their cache descriptions.

As for all the Pocket Quary users, added graphics is not the answer. This information should be in the text of the cache description.

 

Preparation, the first law to survival.

39197_400.jpg

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quote:
Originally posted by glynnfam:

A cache hider with no pets might not even be aware of whether or not an area is open to dogs.


 

I don't expect onyone to think of everything, while making out their cache description. Even if there were check the appropriate icon boxes. I don't think everyone will think of everything about their location.

However there is a quick and easy fix for this info. Additionally those that use Pocket Quary will also get this info. Where if icons were used they may not appear on the quaries. If you hunt a cache that has limitations or restrictions, email the owner. Request they edit their cache info to reflect these restrictions. New cachers may not know that people would like this info before setting out.

This is an easy fix. Without putting the burden on the GeoCaching web masters.

 

Preparation, the first law to survival.

39197_400.jpg

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I would like to pay a well deserved tribute to a great geocaching team.

icon_frown.gif

 

If only we taught him not to run free like that.

 

If this advice helps one owner keep his best friend, then it was well worth the time it took to post. Let Chi be a lesson to all you geocaching pooches out there...STAY ON YOUR LEASH...PERIOD.

 

We will always remember our boy. icon_frown.gif

 

Our feet go where the caches are! feet.gif

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OMG, so sorry to hear of Chi's death... I have a Dalmatian and while we always keep him on leash, he does sometimes sneak out and take off in a run down the street. We live in a suburban area and luckily the traffic is not bad. But getting hit by a car is one of my worst fears... My thoughts are with you!

 

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frog.gif Free your mind and the rest will follow frog.gif

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I wanted to reply to the title of this post and then saw the news about Chi...

 

I own several caches and each one has info on whether its dog-friendly or not. I use a great little tool from the Texas Geocaching Association called The Selector

 

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frog.gif Free your mind and the rest will follow frog.gif

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Upinyachit, so sorry about your loss. icon_frown.gif Chi looked like a great dog. Don't go blaming yourself dogs love to run.

 

Where we live most caches are dog friendly they are in the middle of nowhere. During the summer I leave my dog Midnight home it's just to hot, but the rest of year she goes with me. I bring a leash and use it often but not always. Some of the local caches are 15+ miles from anything. I have trained Midnight to stay close to me and have trained her avoid all snakes. At least twice she has spoted, stopped and kept me away from a snake. icon_eek.gif

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Sorry about CHi, Upinyachit. Living in an urban area, always crossing streets, getting out of cars with my dog with cars whizzing by, that's always on my mind. MY dog also doesn't understand the danger. But it is a heartbreak when it happens.

 

I like taking my dog and knowing which caches it's ok. Many parks don't allow dogs and you often don't know until you get there.

 

THat's a great device the Texas Geocaching Association put out to set up icons Doc-Dean. Thanks to you all. I just updated all my cache pages with them. Looks great. Hope it helps others.

 

Alan

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Couldn't resist posting a very similar picture icon_smile.gif

quote:
Originally posted by leatherman:

my yippie little poodle goes on every cache even 4 1/2 star caches


ditto my little half-poodle girl

http://img.Groundspeak.com/cache/log/1440474_200.jpg

http://www.geocaching.com/seek/cache_details.aspx?ID=39791

I really wonder where the poodle genes went in this case ... her mom was so neatly curly black, as were most of siblings. The only way to find out is to meet a poodle bachelor, huh?

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Not to put off the issue of if a dog can handle a trail or not but there is a much bigger issue here that a few people have touched on. It would be very good to have a searchable attribute for dog friendly as well as wheelchair access, etc. However, just as with wheelchair caches the "dog friendly" concept is very subjective. My dog climbs into and over rubble piles, can yours?

 

The only way to really tackle the problem is to define "dog friendly" as Dogs are allowed. It us up to the cache owner to add more detailed info to the cache page if he feels that it is needed.

Check out:

Gunpowder Essentials Cache

&

Joppatown Gem Cache

These are two examples of how a simple attribue icon gets the point accross but looking at the discription gives you the info you need to make a decision about how well the cache will work for your wheelchair or dog.

 

The big point here is to get searchablespecial situation attributes added to the cache forms.

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I don't know if this was said, because I skimmed quickly through the replies, but even if it was said, I'll probably be elaborating on the idea. I think having a dog friendly feature on the cache pages would be great. But you guys are taking this differently. In my area, most caches are in city, county, or state parks, and not in random wilderness. And rules very with different parks. Such as the fact, as one city park in my area goes as much as to have a dog park, and allows dogs all the time, another prohibits dogs during any special events, and yet another prohibits dogs alltogether. I think it would be very simple to just include something on the cache page about whether dogs were allowed or were not, cause no one wants to travel to what seems like a cool cache in a nice park, a good distance away, only to find out that their faithful friend is not allowed to help them find the cache.

 

I think at least from now on people should be encouraged to use The Selector at the Texas Geocaching website, or maybe geocaching could adopt it's own for use by members..

 

----

Extra batteries for GPS, don't leave home without 'em.

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