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How do you say it ?


prospector27

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ok is it Geo - cash, Geo - cashay, or Geo - Caysh. the way its spelt i though it would the last one. I thinking cash is bit silly as cash $$ has nothign to do with it but all the youtube vids seem to say Geo-cash I also thought it is the last one as a cache has somethign to do with storage, and they are little storage containers..

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Since "cache" is pronounced "cash" in every English-speaking place I've been, my vote goes for "gee-oh-cash". However, your local dialect should prevail and I dare say that some from NSW would use your last pronounciation - probably with a rising inflection B)

 

Ditto.

 

cache (kash)

n.

1.

a. A hiding place used especially for storing provisions.

b. A place for concealment and safekeeping, as of valuables.

c. A store of goods or valuables concealed in a hiding place: maintained a cache of food in case of emergencies.

2. Computer Science A fast storage buffer in the central processing unit of a computer. Also called cache memory.

tr.v. cached, cach·ing, cach·es

To hide or store in a cache. See Synonyms at hide1.

[French, from cacher, to hide, from Old French, to press, hide, from Vulgar Latin *cocticre, to store, pack together, frequentative of Latin coctre, to constrain, from coctus, past participle of cgere, to force; see cogent.]

Edited by keehotee
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in computer speak cache is pronounced caysh. lol. i just think seems wierd to call it a cash, "hey look i found the "cash". when there is no cash lol.

 

Maybe in the US - not in the UK it isn't. B)

The co-ords under his avatar puts the OP in New South Wales, Australia. Although the infamous interrogatory inflection is strongest in and around Sydney, I suspect they still make every sentence a question where the OP lives! Also, there are some strong pronunciation differences between Oz and UK. So it wouldn't surprise me if, like some parts of NY, they pronounce that syllable with a strong twang so that it sounds like "ka-ish".

 

When all's said and done, the most likely time the OP will use the spoken form is when talking to people in his area, which is why I wrote that the local dialect should prevail! Perhaps searching YouTube or similar for Australian-made clips about geocaching might help.

 

HTH,

 

Geoff

Edited by Pajaholic
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in computer speak cache is pronounced caysh. lol. i just think seems wierd to call it a cash, "hey look i found the "cash". when there is no cash lol.

 

Maybe in the US - not in the UK it isn't. B)

 

I've never heard a computer cache pronounced cayche either. I'm from the U.S. and fairly recently implemented a caching mechanism into a web application I developed. I got about an 800% performance improvement on that section of the app with caching turned on.

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in computer speak cache is pronounced caysh. lol. i just think seems wierd to call it a cash, "hey look i found the "cash". when there is no cash lol.
Huh? "caysh"? Long "A"?!? B) Not in my 25 years in the industry, nor according to Wikipedia:
In computer science, a cache (pronounced /kæʃ/[/font], kash) is a collection of data duplicating original values stored elsewhere or computed earlier

 

The word "cache" has been around for centuries, and as far as I know has always been pronounced "cache"

 

 

Merriam-Webster:

 

Main Entry: 1cache Pronunciation: \ˈkash\Function: noun Etymology: French, from cacher to press, hide, from Vulgar Latin *coacticare to press together, from Latin coactare to compel, frequentative of cogere to compel Date: 17971 a : a hiding place especially for concealing and preserving provisions or implements b : a secure place of storage

2 : something hidden or stored in a cache

3 : a computer memory with very short access time used for storage of frequently or recently used instructions or data —called also cache memory

 

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ok is it Geo - cash, Geo - cashay, or Geo - Caysh. the way its spelt i though it would the last one. I thinking cash is bit silly as cash $$ has nothign to do with it but all the youtube vids seem to say Geo-cash I also thought it is the last one as a cache has somethign to do with storage, and they are little storage containers..

 

How do you pronounce Geocaching? 
You pronounce it Geo-cashing, like cashing a check.

 

From: http://www.geocaching.com/faq/

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The word "cache" has been around for centuries, and as far as I know has always been pronounced "cache"

 

Merriam-Webster: {...}

Sorry, but you really are in the wrong continent (on two counts) to comment. Although you call the language you speak "English" you should really call it "American" or "American English" IMO since there are enough differences between American and English for them to be distinct. For example, Americans call boots trunks, wings fenders, courgettes zucchini(s), aubergines egg-plants, roads pavements, and pavements sidewalks. Even the units of measure are different as each gallon magically loses about a fifth as it crosses the Great Pond from right to left. Websters is an American reference and so doesn't count in this discussion. FWIW, even the pronunciation guide of the Oxford English Dictionary doesn't really count either since Australian is at least a different dialect with many conventions that fly in the face of conventional English.

 

The question asked here is "How should an Australian pronounce "geocache"? The OP's preference coincides with Mrs B knowledge of the dialect of the OP's part of the World. Thus he should pronounce it "geo-caysh" when talking to fellow Aussies because it seems that's how it's pronounced over there.

 

JMHO,

 

Geoff

Edited by Pajaholic
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The word "cache" has been around for centuries, and as far as I know has always been pronounced "cache"

 

Merriam-Webster: {...}

Sorry, but you really are in the wrong continent (on two counts) to comment. Although you call the language you speak "English" you should really call it "American" or "American English" IMO since there are enough differences between American and English for them to be distinct. For example, Americans call boots trunks, wings fenders, courgettes zucchini(s), aubergines egg-plants, roads pavements, and pavements sidewalks. Even the units of measure are different as each gallon magically loses about a fifth as it crosses the Great Pond from right to left. Websters is an American reference and so doesn't count in this discussion. FWIW, even the pronunciation guide of the Oxford English Dictionary doesn't really count either since Australian is at least a different dialect with many conventions that fly in the face of conventional English.

 

The question asked here is "How should an Australian pronounce "geocache"? The OP's preference coincides with Mrs B knowledge of the dialect of the OP's part of the World. Thus he should pronounce it "geo-caysh" when talking to fellow Aussies because it seems that's how it's pronounced over there.

 

JMHO,

 

Geoff

Good point. I guess it just depends where you live.

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The word "cache" has been around for centuries, and as far as I know has always been pronounced "cache"

 

Merriam-Webster: {...}

Sorry, but you really are in the wrong continent (on two counts) to comment. Although you call the language you speak "English" you should really call it "American" or "American English" IMO since there are enough differences between American and English for them to be distinct. For example, Americans call boots trunks, wings fenders, courgettes zucchini(s), aubergines egg-plants, roads pavements, and pavements sidewalks. Even the units of measure are different as each gallon magically loses about a fifth as it crosses the Great Pond from right to left. Websters is an American reference and so doesn't count in this discussion. FWIW, even the pronunciation guide of the Oxford English Dictionary doesn't really count either since Australian is at least a different dialect with many conventions that fly in the face of conventional English.

The question asked here is "How should an Australian pronounce "geocache"? The OP's preference coincides with Mrs B knowledge of the dialect of the OP's part of the World. Thus he should pronounce it "geo-caysh" when talking to fellow Aussies because it seems that's how it's pronounced over there.

JMHO,

Geoff

 

Yeah, well see here, mayte: you call a crosswalk a zebra crossing, a dead battery you call flat battery, and a dirt road an unmade road. Have you ever seen a zebra cross the road, or a flat battery, and if its unmade, how can it be a road? :)B)

 

Perhaps this will help you understand us blokes: http://www.translatebritish.com/

 

Seriously... what dictionary is considered the authority for British pronunciation? Cambridge? If that's the case, here's what they have to say: http://dictionary.cambridge.org/results.as...p;x=41&y=10

Edited by knowschad
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(seriously... what dictionary is considered the authority for British pronunciation? Cambridge? If that's the case, here's what they have to say: http://dictionary.cambridge.org/results.as...p;x=41&y=10

Usually, the Oxford English Dictionary is considered the repository of formal English. However, even in England we have dialects that differ markedly from formal (aka "Oxford") English. That said, where "cache" is pronounced with a long "a" it's more likely to be the soft mutation ("ah") rather than the harder "ay".

 

There are 6 connected but distinct languages that call themselves English: British, US & Canadian, Australian & New Zealand, Indian, African, West Indian. Within each of these are several dialects with some being incomprehensible to another from a different culture even those both claim to speak "English". Add to that the same word in one variant might have a completely different meaning in another and it should be apparent that semantics and pronunciation in one area can't be taken as a precedent for another.

 

Geoff

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Of course, Prospector27 said that the "cayche" pronunciation was only for the computer version of cache (or, if I may extrapolate from that, that any use of the word "cache" would be pronounced like that). Wouldn't the Aussies (or NZ'ers) also pronounce "cash" the same way, just as we pronounce both words the same here in the U.S.?

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The word "cache" has been around for centuries, and as far as I know has always been pronounced "cache"

 

Merriam-Webster: {...}

Even the units of measure are different as each gallon magically loses about a fifth as it crosses the Great Pond from right to left.

 

Geoff

They don't GET smaller, they only LOOK smaller. Haha, or the Sailors drank some on the way??

 

It should be pronounced the same way as a "Weapons Cache" would be wherever you live.

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Of course, Prospector27 said that the "cayche" pronunciation was only for the computer version of cache (or, if I may extrapolate from that, that any use of the word "cache" would be pronounced like that). Wouldn't the Aussies (or NZ'ers) also pronounce "cash" the same way, just as we pronounce both words the same here in the U.S.?

Not necessarily. Different variations of English can have different pronunciation rules. In his opening post, the OP of this thread indicated that "cash" is pronounced differently to "cache" where he lives and there are other examples where one variant of English has just one pronunciation where another has two or more. For example, according to Webster Online, Americans pronounce "router" differently depending on whether they mean a piece of network hardware or a woodworking power tool. However, an Australian engineer with who I recently worked pronounced it in both contexts the same way an American or a Briton would pronounce it to mean a woodworking power tool.

 

Geoff

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Of course, Prospector27 said that the "cayche" pronunciation was only for the computer version of cache (or, if I may extrapolate from that, that any use of the word "cache" would be pronounced like that). Wouldn't the Aussies (or NZ'ers) also pronounce "cash" the same way, just as we pronounce both words the same here in the U.S.?

Not necessarily. Different variations of English can have different pronunciation rules. In his opening post, the OP of this thread indicated that "cash" is pronounced differently to "cache" where he lives and there are other examples where one variant of English has just one pronunciation where another has two or more. For example, according to Webster Online, Americans pronounce "router" differently depending on whether they mean a piece of network hardware or a woodworking power tool. However, an Australian engineer with who I recently worked pronounced it in both contexts the same way an American or a Briton would pronounce it to mean a woodworking power tool.

 

Geoff

In my part of the US of A the name for a piece of networking hardware and a woodworking tool are both pronounced the same. And it isn't ruter. :)

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Being from New Jersey, I have finally come to realize that the rest of the country pronounces things wrong. They seem to be missing some vowel pronunciations. Daughter is not pronounced the same way as dotter. We have this very nice 'aw' sound, which is NOT the same as 'ah'. I had a customer in Pittsburgh tell me that I needed to talk to 'Don' about that. I told him that I didn't know Don. He said that I spoke with her frequently. Duh! He meant Dawn! Two entirely different words! But, what does he know? He drinks pop. I drink soda!

So, I may pronounce 'cache' and 'cash' the same way, but it's probably not the same way that the rest of the country mispronounces it! :)

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Being from New Jersey, I have finally come to realize that the rest of the country pronounces things wrong. They seem to be missing some vowel pronunciations. Daughter is not pronounced the same way as dotter. We have this very nice 'aw' sound, which is NOT the same as 'ah'. I had a customer in Pittsburgh tell me that I needed to talk to 'Don' about that. I told him that I didn't know Don. He said that I spoke with her frequently. Duh! He meant Dawn! Two entirely different words! But, what does he know? He drinks pop. I drink soda!

So, I may pronounce 'cache' and 'cash' the same way, but it's probably not the same way that the rest of the country mispronounces it! :)

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Being from New Jersey, I have finally come to realize that the rest of the country pronounces things wrong. They seem to be missing some vowel pronunciations. Daughter is not pronounced the same way as dotter. We have this very nice 'aw' sound, which is NOT the same as 'ah'. I had a customer in Pittsburgh tell me that I needed to talk to 'Don' about that. I told him that I didn't know Don. He said that I spoke with her frequently. Duh! He meant Dawn! Two entirely different words! But, what does he know? He drinks pop. I drink soda!

So, I may pronounce 'cache' and 'cash' the same way, but it's probably not the same way that the rest of the country mispronounces it! :)

 

Let's bring up "wash" and "warsh" ;)

 

 

But seriously... sure there are regional pronunciations and colloquilisms. That doesn't mean that they are proper "English" (ain't that right, y'all?) The original question was how "geocache" is pronounced. Sorry, blokes, but "geocache" is an American invention, and it is pronounced GEOCASH. You lose. Next? :huh: I promise to pronounce "pasty" as "pass-tee" and not "paste-ee", deal?

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I promise to pronounce "pasty" as "pass-tee" and not "paste-ee", deal?

Pronounce it whichever way you wish. However, pasties are a Cornish invention and the real deal are pronounced "oggie"! :)

 

Geoff

 

Actually - although mainly associated with Cornwall, pasties are a Devon invention, and only passed to Cornwall in the 18th century when the majority of Devon's miners migrated across the border to work the mineral deposits over there....

 

And my network connection is routed through a rooter, next to some woodwork that was finished with a rowter. :huh:

Edited by keehotee
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I promise to pronounce "pasty" as "pass-tee" and not "paste-ee", deal?

Pronounce it whichever way you wish. However, pasties are a Cornish invention and the real deal are pronounced "oggie"! :)

 

Geoff

 

Actually - although mainly associated with Cornwall, pasties are a Devon invention, and only passed to Cornwall in the 18th century when the majority of Devon's miners migrated across the border to work the mineral deposits over there....

 

And my network connection is routed through a rooter, next to some woodwork that was finished with a rowter. :huh:

 

Gosh you Devonians..

 

"However Les Merton, author of The Official Encyclopaedia of the Cornish Pasty, said evidence of the pasty could be found in Cornwall from 8,000 BC.

 

He said: "There are caves at the Lizard in Cornwall with line drawings of men hunting a stag and women eating a pasty.

 

"At that time it was wrapped in leaves and not pastry, but the leaves were crimped, so I would say there is positive evidence of pasties in Cornwall from primitive times."

 

And I'd go with Geoc cash ing

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I'm a Brit, living in North America (Canada) and it is pronounced "cash" here. When I moved here from the UK, I had to quickly become bilingual (Canadian English/British English)....some English words I used had me blushing when I was told what they meant here! I still get into trouble from time to time....

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Not necessarily. Different variations of English can have different pronunciation rules. In his opening post, the OP of this thread indicated that "cash" is pronounced differently to "cache" where he lives and there are other examples where one variant of English has just one pronunciation where another has two or more. For example, according to Webster Online, Americans pronounce "router" differently depending on whether they mean a piece of network hardware or a woodworking power tool. However, an Australian engineer with who I recently worked pronounced it in both contexts the same way an American or a Briton would pronounce it to mean a woodworking power tool.

 

Geoff

 

And my network connection is routed through a rooter, next to some woodwork that was finished with a rowter. :rolleyes:

 

Interesting! I have never heard either the network hardware or the woodworking power tool referred to as anything other than "rowter." "Rooter" is something people do to plugged septic lines! :P

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The word "cache" has been around for centuries, and as far as I know has always been pronounced "cache"

 

Merriam-Webster: {...}

Sorry, but you really are in the wrong continent (on two counts) to comment. Although you call the language you speak "English" you should really call it "American" or "American English" IMO since there are enough differences between American and English for them to be distinct. For example, Americans call boots trunks, wings fenders, courgettes zucchini(s), aubergines egg-plants, roads pavements, and pavements sidewalks. Even the units of measure are different as each gallon magically loses about a fifth as it crosses the Great Pond from right to left. Websters is an American reference and so doesn't count in this discussion. FWIW, even the pronunciation guide of the Oxford English Dictionary doesn't really count either since Australian is at least a different dialect with many conventions that fly in the face of conventional English.

The question asked here is "How should an Australian pronounce "geocache"? The OP's preference coincides with Mrs B knowledge of the dialect of the OP's part of the World. Thus he should pronounce it "geo-caysh" when talking to fellow Aussies because it seems that's how it's pronounced over there.

JMHO,

Geoff

 

Yeah, well see here, mayte: you call a crosswalk a zebra crossing, a dead battery you call flat battery, and a dirt road an unmade road. Have you ever seen a zebra cross the road, or a flat battery, and if its unmade, how can it be a road? :P:anibad:

 

Perhaps this will help you understand us blokes: http://www.translatebritish.com/

 

Seriously... what dictionary is considered the authority for British pronunciation? Cambridge? If that's the case, here's what they have to say: http://dictionary.cambridge.org/results.as...p;x=41&y=10

 

I have bolded the part I am referring to, sorry, you cannot say that with any kind of authority, as it seems your answer comes from hearsay. Being Australian, but not a New South Wales mexican, I can tell you with absolute authority that both pronouncations- cash and caysh are used here, in roughly equal proportions. Personally, I use cash.

And please, lets not talk about what is called this here, is called that there. Pavements/sidewalks PFFFTTTTT, they are Footpaths. Wings/fenders- try Mudguards. We could go on forever.

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I have bolded the part I am referring to, sorry, you cannot say that with any kind of authority, as it seems your answer comes from hearsay. Being Australian, but not a New South Wales mexican, I can tell you with absolute authority that both pronouncations- cash and caysh are used here, in roughly equal proportions. Personally, I use cash.

Hmmm ... AFAICT, You're from Queensland, so with all respects your comments are a bit like a New Yorker telling us how Texans pronounce stuff! FWIW, I'm not claiming authority and I've made the hearsay nature of my comments completely clear. It happens that the engineer I cited is over here from NSW, the OP whose preference I quoted is from NSW, and my son's girlfriend (from just outside Melbourne) also pronounces it "Kaysh" (albeit with a twang rather than the hard "a" of "cake"). That said, I've repeatedly pointed out that local dialect - whatever that might be - should prevail.

 

Geoff

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