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REVIEWERS


mimi0674
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ya know, i've found that opening the conversation with your reviewer early is a big help. for instance, if you just go and place a cache too close to a school, you may be rejected. if you do your homework and produce sufficient information about your permissions from the school and their requirements, it may be approved.

 

ditto that railroad track. i know of one cache that shows up on a map as being right on an active track. the map does not show that it's an elevated track over a recreational area. if you tell your reviewer this ahead of time, you'll get maximum results.

 

on the off chance that your reviewer really IS a pain, it will not help your case any to say so publicly. save that for your friends.

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By the way, your understanding about NY Admin couldn't be more wrong. She's probably lived in NY longer than you've been alive.

 

Dang! There goes all my conjecture. NY Admin is female?!? And retired?!? Who'd a thunk? But that would mean...

I think that I've met this person! (Doing a Marlon Brando imitation.)

 

As for the rest of this thread... Not as fun as trackinabox's geocide. But close. Belitle your reviewer. Question his/her desicions. Great way to make friends and influence people!

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I've just returned from a marvelous six hour caching trip. When finding four new caches in a park 10 miles north of my home, I said to my friend "wow, I never knew there was this trail system back here behind the ball field." Then we found four very clever micros placed at fishing holes along a stream five miles west of my town. I said to my friend "wow, I never knew this road and this stream were here."

 

I guess I shouldn't have published those caches since I don't know the area! :rolleyes:

 

Meanwhile, I know Central New York like the back of my hand. I can navigate you from Moravia to Locke to Sempronius with my eyes shut. That was my cousin's paper route when I was a kid.

 

I'm here to post a reminder to *everyone* -- whether newcomer or veteran -- that Groundspeak's volunteers are entitled to the same respect that must be given to all other community members under our posted forum guidelines. By and large, this has been a helpful thread, and I'm going to leave it here in the "Getting Started" forum because it's educational.

 

But, if there is any more name calling or insults, posters may be receiving an education of a different kind.

 

Thanks.

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ya know, i've found that opening the conversation with your reviewer early is a big help. for instance, if you just go and place a cache too close to a school, you may be rejected. if you do your homework and produce sufficient information about your permissions from the school and their requirements, it may be approved.

 

ditto that railroad track. i know of one cache that shows up on a map as being right on an active track. the map does not show that it's an elevated track over a recreational area. if you tell your reviewer this ahead of time, you'll get maximum results.

 

on the off chance that your reviewer really IS a pain, it will not help your case any to say so publicly. save that for your friends.

Thats something I would definetly agree with.

If your first conversation with your reviewer is you railing on them for delaying a cache to ask questions / asking for changes to better fit the guidelines, they will probably form a negative impression of you. Something that may stick with you for a long time, it may even kill whatever leeway they Might have given you. OTOH if you have a history of being polite and respectful, even when you don't agree, then it may be easier to persuade them to your view of 'why this cache is not violating X guideline'. Besides, who would do more to help someone they think is a jerk? :rolleyes:

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i don't agree with you on the power hungry statement however, i do feel kinda frustrated sometimes when i try to place a cache. i use a magellan explorist 100 gps, real simple. i have yet to find on the gps where it gives me a distance between caches and before i place one i check the 'map it' for my zip code. then i go caching and i find caches definetley within the 528 ft guideline. what really gets me is when a new one gets approved near one of my caches and you can throw a rock from one to the other!! oh well life is too short to worry about it so i just continue on!

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what really gets me is when a new one gets approved near one of my caches and you can throw a rock from one to the other!! oh well life is too short to worry about it so i just continue on!

Thank you for your post. As a point of order, a check of your eight hidden caches disclosed no violations or exceptions to the Cache Saturation Guideline, with respect to either nearby traditional caches or hidden additional waypoints for nearby multicaches and puzzle caches. So, from that information I am concluding that you are capable of throwing a rock more than 528 feet! :rolleyes:

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I've only placed a few caches and have been just as frustrated with being too close to another cache. I recently had one refused because it violated the guideline by 33ft.

I don't blame the reviewer though. They play the game just the same as we do. I don't know a cacher one who doesn't like to see new caches! They WORK for no pay and an often thankless job. They are only human and entitled to make a few mistakes.

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Still better then trying to do the whole state with one person isnt Mr. Know it all what you mr new york now know all the mileage. doesnt take long to learn areas youve lived in your whole life there genius.

So you've lived there your whole life. That's what? 13yrs? Surely you didnt cover ALL 2,982 square miles (1,908,480 acres) on your paper route?

Try 32 years genius but being you know it all you should of known

Out of curiosity I took a look at your profile. I am impressed - You're 32 and retired - what is your secret?

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Still better then trying to do the whole state with one person isnt Mr. Know it all what you mr new york now know all the mileage. doesnt take long to learn areas youve lived in your whole life there genius.

So you've lived there your whole life. That's what? 13yrs? Surely you didnt cover ALL 2,982 square miles (1,908,480 acres) on your paper route?

Try 32 years genius but being you know it all you should of known

Out of curiosity I took a look at your profile. I am impressed - You're 32 and retired - what is your secret?

 

hurt my back had to have back surgery and still have to possibly have another one am now disabled because of it so i had to give up working so i put retired

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By the way, your understanding about NY Admin couldn't be more wrong. She's probably lived in NY longer than you've been alive.

 

... or maybe not. Profile says "Retired". :blink: (Your point is still valid though).

 

What if NY Admin is in her 90's?

 

90 and probably in better health than all of us put together!! :rolleyes:

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Attitudes like this must be the reason some reviewers keep a "secret identity" separate from their regular caching username.

 

Every reviewer I've met has been a great person and very helpful.

Amen, brother. Sheesh.

 

007 adminstrators!! Cool... I've always wanted to work under cover.... where do I sign up??

 

Just a note, I have had no problems with the NY Admin.... if there is a problem, I work it out or move on... no big deal for me. I have found most everyone here in the Geocaching community to be helpful and fun to chat with. NY Admin has been great and I have been sure to thank her (I didn't know she was a she... of course, she's undercover) for her help and time.

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my corollary to the rule about giving your reviewer full information about permissions and mitigating factors:

 

if you lie to your reviewer, you can guarantee that from now on only the most simple and obviously legal caches of yours will get published, and maybe not even all of them.

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like i said, i don't see on my gps where it tells me how far one cache is from another. its not that big of a deal, i was just stating some seem well within the 528 ft guideline, maybe they aren't. to me when you can see from one cache to another, it just makes it kinda like wow...but in the end who cares!!!???

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like i said, i don't see on my gps where it tells me how far one cache is from another. its not that big of a deal, i was just stating some seem well within the 528 ft guideline, maybe they aren't. to me when you can see from one cache to another, it just makes it kinda like wow...but in the end who cares!!!???

 

If you have all the caches downloaded in your gps.. then doing a simple search for the nearest cache, after you are in the spot you intend to place your cache.. then your gps should show you how far you are away from the nearest cache from your location...

 

Does that make sense, I am not that good at articulating words into mental pictures.....

 

If you are an engineer... try this.....

 

1. Download caches into your gps from the area that you intend to place your cache.

2. Go to the spot that you intend to place your cache.

3. Be sure to have your gps unit on, and then find the function that let's you locate the nearest cache.

4. Write down, or memorize, how far that cache is.

5. Place your cache, if it is more than .10 miles from the next nearest cache.

6. Don't place your cache if it is less than .10 miles from the next nearest cache.

7. If you placed your cache, mark your position.

8. Input the information to the gc.com site and wait for approval/denial.

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like i said, i don't see on my gps where it tells me how far one cache is from another. its not that big of a deal, i was just stating some seem well within the 528 ft guideline, maybe they aren't. to me when you can see from one cache to another, it just makes it kinda like wow...but in the end who cares!!!???

 

If you have all the caches downloaded in your gps.. then doing a simple search for the nearest cache, after you are in the spot you intend to place your cache.. then your gps should show you how far you are away from the nearest cache from your location...

 

Does that make sense, I am not that good at articulating words into mental pictures.....

 

If you are an engineer... try this.....

 

1. Download caches into your gps from the area that you intend to place your cache.

2. Go to the spot that you intend to place your cache.

3. Be sure to have your gps unit on, and then find the function that let's you locate the nearest cache.

4. Write down, or memorize, how far that cache is.

5. Place your cache, if it is more than .10 miles from the next nearest cache.

6. Don't place your cache if it is less than .10 miles from the next nearest cache.

7. If you placed your cache, mark your position.

8. Input the information to the gc.com site and wait for approval/denial.

You could try Google earth as well,but I'm not sure that would be accurate enough.However it would give an immedate view of the close caches in the area.

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here's a handy tip:

 

figure out where you'd like to put your cache. even pretty close works.

 

email your approver and ask if there are any proximity problems. if there are none, the approver will be able to tell you and you'll have wide latitude for that area. if there are problems, you can guess you're near the radius for at least one stage of an existing multi or puzzle. you can then refine your intended coordinates or move to a different area.

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I am interested in becoming a volunteer reviewer. Anybody know how I can become one?

 

Kojones

 

Spend a few years developing a good reputation in your local geocaching community, work with parks personel on geocaching issues and demonstrate a familarity with the guidelines by placing well maintained, problem free caches. If you do all this and if there is a need in your area, you may get the call.

 

It's generally a "don't call us, we'll call you" deal. As the joke goes, anybody who wants the job is too dumb to have it.

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