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Is Indoor Caching Allowed?


scavok
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I have permission from my local library to place micro caches within it, I just didn't know if it was allowed per geocaching.com? My idea was to have a magnetic micro hidden (yes I have good spots that wont be muggled) in the shelves and the seeker would have to look up specific passages in non circulatory books (ones that can't be checked out) in order to get clues as to where it is hidden.

 

There would be a few of these micros hidden in the library, each with a clue in it to find a traditional cache via GPS in the library's backyard with swag and a log.

 

Good idea, I think, but is it allowed?

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I found a mystery cache once that had stage 1 right in the middle of a mall. It was difficult to get to using the GPSr, but a very fun cache, I had to use my wits to find it. I don't know about all the rules, but if they say yes, I say go for it, it sounds like fun!

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I found a mystery cache once that had stage 1 right in the middle of a mall. It was difficult to get to using the GPSr, but a very fun cache, I had to use my wits to find it. I don't know about all the rules, but if they say yes, I say go for it, it sounds like fun!

 

Sounds interesting, what's the name of that cache anyway? :huh::rolleyes::)

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OP wrote:

There would be a few of these micros hidden in the library, each with a clue in it to find a traditional cache via GPS...

 

That should work fine, in that a GPS would be required.

I suspect where you'd run into resistance from your local cache reviewer is if you placed one that did not require a GPS: in other words if MapQuest showed where the library was and the rest was done indoors using the Dewey Decimal System instead of our GPS's latitude and longitude system it really wouldn't be geocaching, would it?

 

~erik~

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OP wrote:

There would be a few of these micros hidden in the library, each with a clue in it to find a traditional cache via GPS...

 

That should work fine, in that a GPS would be required.

I suspect where you'd run into resistance from your local cache reviewer is if you placed one that did not require a GPS: in other words if MapQuest showed where the library was and the rest was done indoors using the Dewey Decimal System instead of our GPS's latitude and longitude system it really wouldn't be geocaching, would it?

 

~erik~

 

Erik, I wish some of the reviewers round here would insist on a bit more GPSr content for some of the outdoor caches they publish. It's quite common to find a cache with just a coordinate for the parking place (and not always even that), and then a story leading you along a trail like this http://www.geocaching.com/seek/cache_detai...d8-f3bf0664b232 (if you want to place a letterbox, call it a letterbox), or a puzzle which leads you to a specific place without GPS coordinates, such as this http://www.geocaching.com/seek/cache_detai...37-b8b757152777.

 

I've done both of these caches; while the second was fun, the first was a total pain, because the terrain had changed and so the path no longer worked. But in both cases, I could have left the GPSr at home.

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You could make it a puzzle-multi hybrid thing. You can provide coordinates for a sign at or near the library, then have the cacher solve some sort of puzzle using the sign to get the Dewey decimal number for the second stage inside the library. Then the cacher could get the Dewey decimal number for another container in the library or the coordinates to the final stage outside. In this scenario the cacher would have to use their GPSr twice.

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I found a mystery cache once that had stage 1 right in the middle of a mall. It was difficult to get to using the GPSr, but a very fun cache, I had to use my wits to find it. I don't know about all the rules, but if they say yes, I say go for it, it sounds like fun!

 

Sounds interesting, what's the name of that cache anyway? :):rolleyes::huh:

 

Seeking After Signs…

by Bob & Seanette Blaylock [profile]

 

 

N 38° 36.090 W 121° 25.643

UTM: 10S E 636940 N 4273728

SW 7.4mi from your home coordinates.

or convert to NAD27 at Jeeep.com

 

Click icon to download:

 

Read about waypoint downloads

 

In California, United States [view map]

Hidden: 2/26/2005

Use waypoint: GCMY28 (what's this?)

 

 

Sorry, I don't know how to make it a link. This was quite a tricky cache, but very fun and I felt like I accomplished something when I figured it out. One of those Aha! moments.

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I have permission from my local library to place micro caches within it, I just didn't know if it was allowed per geocaching.com? My idea was to have a magnetic micro hidden (yes I have good spots that wont be muggled) in the shelves and the seeker would have to look up specific passages in non circulatory books (ones that can't be checked out) in order to get clues as to where it is hidden.

 

There would be a few of these micros hidden in the library, each with a clue in it to find a traditional cache via GPS in the library's backyard with swag and a log.

 

Good idea, I think, but is it allowed?

 

That should work fine, in that a GPS would be required.

I suspect where you'd run into resistance from your local cache reviewer is if you placed one that did not require a GPS: in other words if MapQuest showed where the library was and the rest was done indoors using the Dewey Decimal System instead of our GPS's latitude and longitude system it really wouldn't be geocaching, would it?

 

~erik~

 

I suggest following Erik's advice. He's one of the guys that actually review the caches before they are listed on geocaching.com . Some of the examples other people are linking to are older caches that don't meet the current guidelines for getting a cache listed. The old caches are grandfathered in, but new caches like them probably won't be listed. The guidelines can be found here. Pay attention to this part:

You as the owner of the cache must visit the site and obtain the coordinates with a GPS. If time allows take several reading at different times over a few days and average the results. This will help you achieve greater accuracy on your coordinates. GPS usage is an essential element of geocaching. Therefore, although it is possible to find a cache without a GPS, the option of using accurate GPS coordinates as an integral part of the cache hunt must be demonstrated for all physical cache submissions.
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There is an indoor cache at Mall of America that I found once. They had you count different objects around the park to give an address number to store. You just needed to ask the cashier at the store to give you the cache and they would. The cache is Mall of America Cache III

Yet another grandfathered cache that would never be published under current guidelines. It says right on the cache page "No GPS required." And asking a cashier for the cache? That fails the "no commercial caches" guideline big-time.

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