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Log Books


jeremy9143
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For smaller caches I take the spiral bound pocket notebooks (the kind with the wire running along the long side of the notebook) and cut them in half. They'll then fit in an Altoids container, or decon box.

 

For micros, I'll take a few sheets of lined paper, cut to fit, staple them together, and roll them up inside. They unfurl against the inside of the container, leaving room for a few small trade items.

 

"You can't make a man by standing a sheep on his hind legs. But by standing a flock of sheep in that position, you can make a crowd of men" - Max Beerbohm

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I have a large papercutter at work that I have access to, so I cut the bottom 1/3 or so off a pocket spiral notebook to fit in a 1-quart paint can. If you find a paper supply store in your area, they can cut them down for you, but they might require you to buy the notebooks from them. They usually have decent prices, too.

 

"I'm 35 Years old, I am divorced, and I live in van down by the river!" - Matt Foley

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I just did a cache this past weekend that had the index cards on the spiral thing that worked good. They were bright neon colors too, so it even looked better.

 

I got permission today to place caches and will be doing so in the next couple of days. I'm thinking of 2 caches actually, one a micro and the other a regular (small ammo box). I had read somewhere that someone used waterproof paper in their micro. Where can you buy that?

 

Brian

 

As long as you're going to think anyway, think big. -Donald Trump

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quote:
Where can you buy that?

 

National Geographic Adventure paper. You can find it at REI and many outdoors stores, particularly if they sell National Geographic Topo!, or DeLorme.

 

Some people use Rite in the Rain, but that really isn't waterproof.

 

"You can't make a man by standing a sheep on his hind legs. But by standing a flock of sheep in that position, you can make a crowd of men" - Max Beerbohm

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Cool there's an REI down the road. Guess I wil lgo and check it out in the next day or so. Gotta go that way anyway and find this place I have an interview with next week. dadgum BrianSnat, i'm beginning to sound more like you, out getting a job and all...lol

 

Brian

 

As long as you're going to think anyway, think big. -Donald Trump

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I was just gonna ask about waterproof paper... icon_smile.gif Unfortunately I've never heard of REI (aside from seeing it mentioned here). I'll have to do a search but I doubt there are any close to me - I'll likely have to resort to mail-order/internet-order.

 

Sept1c - What are the 2 caches you posted the logbook pictures named? I have some questions about small logs - and the first one just looks neat icon_smile.gif

 

sd

 

"Man can counterfeit everything except silence". - William Faulkner

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Am I the only one who can't get a pen to write on Rite in the Rain paper? I can scribble all I want, but the ink won't keep flowing. Pencil works, but I dislike using pencil on logs since it can smear.

 

I like using a folded or rolled bit of paper for a micro log sheet. Staples may work okay on thin paper, but some cachers around here seem to like to staple small bits of heavy cardstock together, and the staples always come loose when people try to turn the stiff pages. They then stick me in the fingers, because I am capable of injuring myself on darn near anything.

 

Oh, and another poor selection for a log book -- a notepad held together by only the rubbery gluey stuff on one end. The pages will be coming off in a matter of days.

 

[This message was edited by Kite & Hawkeye on September 04, 2003 at 01:29 PM.]

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National Geographic Adventure paper is some cool intense stuff icon_smile.gif

 

You can get it at most any outdoor store. I've seen it at Gander Mountain as well and I didn't look, but I'd be suprised if EMS didn't stock it.

 

It's expensive, but man... it's cool. Rite in the Rain is weatherproof, but Adventure Paper is /waterproof/.

 

You can print a topo map on it using your /inkjet/ printer (in color) and use it /under water/ icon_smile.gif At the store I was at, they had a topo printed on a sheet from National Geographic Topo and put it in a clear water bottle on display. The encouraged you to take it out of the water so we did. Pretty sweet stuff. VERY sturdy even when wet.

 

I was impressed to say the least icon_smile.gif Maybe it's not easy to write on when wet, but it will preserve your log entries.

 

--------

trippy1976 - Team KKF2A

Assimilating golf balls - one geocache at a time.

Flat_MiGeo_A88.gif

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quote:
Originally posted by Kite & Hawkeye:

Am I the only one who can't get a pen to write on Rite in the Rain paper? I can scribble all I want, but the ink won't keep flowing. Pencil works, but I dislike using pencil on logs since it can smear.


 

No, you're not alone. The paper doesn't absorb water, so it doesn't absorb ink either...

 

Ron/yumitori

 

---

 

Remember what the dormouse said...

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quote:
Originally posted by SLCDave:

I have a large papercutter at work that I have access to, so I cut the bottom 1/3 or so off a pocket spiral notebook to fit in a 1-quart paint can.


 

Follow up question... though sort of off topic. I'm hoping to hide my first cache in the near future and I'm curious about your 1-quart paint can mention.

 

Is it one of those cans that require a screwdriver to open or one with a screw on top?

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quote:
Originally posted by Zoboomafoo:

 

Follow up question... though sort of off topic. I'm hoping to hide my first cache in the near future and I'm curious about your 1-quart paint can mention.

 

Is it one of those cans that require a screwdriver to open or one with a screw on top?


 

Or a 'Church Key'. You can usually find them inexpensively at second-hand stores.

 

Ron/yumitori

 

---

 

Remember what the dormouse said...

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I don't think a paint can will work as a geocache container. It may at first, but once a few finders bend the lid while opening it, it's gonna be real hard to get a tight seal. And if you don't have a hammer along, it's not going to be easy to close it well enough to seal out the weather. It's a cache container that's asking to be left with the lid improperly sealed. That and they rust, very quickly.

 

"You can't make a man by standing a sheep on his hind legs. But by standing a flock of sheep in that position, you can make a crowd of men" - Max Beerbohm

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A roll of adding machine paper is great for making logbooks. Get the size that fits into a film can. Cut a length and roll it up. Works great.. For Altoid cans, I use the same paper roll, but after I roll up a long length, I press the roll flat, staple the top and cut the bottom...voila, instant mini notepad.

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I primed the paint can several times with a Rustoleum primer, then followed up with a couple of coats of Rustoleum Paint. I got the cans at Home Depot for $1.29, and Lowes will give you a paint can opener for free (Don't tell them I sent you!!!) I attached the paint can opener to the cache with a steel cord, so it can't be lost easily.

 

"I'm 35 Years old, I am divorced, and I live in van down by the river!" - Matt Foley

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Originally posted by Kite & Hawkeye:

Am I the only one who can't get a pen to write on Rite in the Rain paper? I can scribble all I want, but the ink won't keep flowing. Pencil works, but I dislike using pencil on logs since it can smear.

 

 

I use Fisher Space Pens. they work great in Rite in the Rain and other treated paper. Either (not sure which one) Staples or Office Depot carry the basic models.

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You can also use Durarite paper and notebooks. Completely waterproof, even under water. Made by the company which makes "Rite in the Rain" paper. They also sell 'All Weather Pens' at that site, as well as Waterproof Labels. While it does say for the labels only for Laser print, it should work for inkjets that use waterproof ink like epsons' "Durabright" series.

 

 

RX

 

Any deity worthy of a graven image can cobble up a working universe complete with fake fossils in under a week - hey, if you're not omnipotent, there's no real point in being a god. But to start with a big ball of elementary particles and end up with the duckbill platypus without constant twiddling requires a degree of subtlety and the ability to Think Things Through: exactly the qualities I'm looking for when I'm shopping for a Supreme Being.

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