Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
Korichnovui

swollen wood constricts the container

Recommended Posts

Hello,

I have a nifty cache setup that I inherited, which is a metal canister off the geocaching shop (specifically this one) which is then placed into a log. The log has an appropriate-sized cylindrical hole drilled into it and a magnetic circular plate at the bottom to help hold the canister in place. The log can then be placed "in nature". I had this for one of my hides and then discovered that when the log gets wet, the wood swells and hold the canister so tightly that you can't get it out and can't unscrew the top. I took it home and left it in my garage for a couple months and now the wood is relaxed and the canister easily goes in/out. Are there any ideas on how to deal with this and salvage the cache setup idea of hiding the canister in the log?

Share this post


Link to post

My first thought would be to drill a larger hole to accommodation a plastic or metal sleeve, which could prevent the cache container from getting squeezed.

  • Upvote 1
  • Helpful 2

Share this post


Link to post

Agree with Touchstone.  A slightly larger hole (you could just rasp it out a bit too) and a cylinder placed inside to fight it.

You say there's a magnet already at the bottom, so should still work fine.   :)

 

We had a bunch in a series sorta like that (logs, bricks, etc...), but glued matchstick holders in the drilled hole.  We wanted them to stay put.

  • Helpful 2

Share this post


Link to post

so ive had this issue with one of my gadget caches, its a birdhouse that you pull out the perch,  but when it rains it swells, usually it doesnt get too bad and there isnt that many cachers who find it when its wet. but i saw one when i visited somewhere else where they used a metal perch for it and it didnt swell so that may help your issue. but if not, as much as it sucks to add a note just saying that you dont reccomend getting it after its rained, it might be your only choice. 

i also believe you might be able to put a finish on the wood.

  • Helpful 1

Share this post


Link to post
4 hours ago, Camroo said:

i also believe you might be able to put a finish on the wood.

For something that's going to be outdoors, a finish is just going to slow down the expansion. It's best to build the wooden components so the inevitable expansion doesn't cause problems.

  • Helpful 2

Share this post


Link to post
On 8/26/2019 at 10:34 AM, Korichnovui said:

Hello,

I have a nifty cache setup that I inherited, which is a metal canister off the geocaching shop (specifically this one) which is then placed into a log. The log has an appropriate-sized cylindrical hole drilled into it and a magnetic circular plate at the bottom to help hold the canister in place. The log can then be placed "in nature". I had this for one of my hides and then discovered that when the log gets wet, the wood swells and hold the canister so tightly that you can't get it out and can't unscrew the top. I took it home and left it in my garage for a couple months and now the wood is relaxed and the canister easily goes in/out. Are there any ideas on how to deal with this and salvage the cache setup idea of hiding the canister in the log?

 

I thought those containers were aluminum.. so the magnet works?

 

The gaskets on these don't last long in my experience. :-(

Share this post


Link to post
On 9/12/2019 at 5:00 PM, bflentje said:

 

I thought those containers were aluminum.. so the magnet works?

 

The gaskets on these don't last long in my experience. :-(

The magnet works ... weakly.

I think you're right about the gaskets. We will have to monitor. I have spares.

To solve my problem, I shaved off a 45 degree angle of wood all around the mouth of the hole. If the canister gets stuck in the wood again, at least this time the cap will be unimpeded and can be screwed off.

Share this post


Link to post
16 hours ago, Korichnovui said:

 

Small.

 

So a finder can expect to be able to drop a trackable inside?

  • Upvote 2

Share this post


Link to post
16 hours ago, Korichnovui said:

Small.

 

Curious, what made you think this was a small ?   I did see your link to the site...

They even say, "Make your micro hides a little bigger with the Small Cylinder Geocache!"  and state that they recommend you use micro log or "double-wide" micro  strips too.   

We'd have a couple, and look at these just as the site says... a "little bigger" micro, so curious.    :)

 

 

Edited by cerberus1

Share this post


Link to post
37 minutes ago, K13 said:

So a finder can expect to be able to drop a trackable inside?

The container description says "big enough to hold some small SWAG and trackables".

 

27 minutes ago, cerberus1 said:

Curious, what made you think this was a small ?

The dimensions listed in the container description put its internal volume at almost 200ml. According to the Help Center article Cache container sizes, "Small containers are 100 milliliters to 1 liter. "

  • Helpful 2

Share this post


Link to post
5 hours ago, K13 said:

 

So a finder can expect to be able to drop a trackable inside?

I put a trackable in it when I hid it, so I should say so. Check out TB8JBMY to see a few pics and get a sense of the size. Sorry for formatting, on my phone and copy/paste made it weird.

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
4 hours ago, cerberus1 said:

 

Curious, what made you think this was a small ?   I did see your link to the site...

They even say, "Make your micro hides a little bigger with the Small Cylinder Geocache!"  and state that they recommend you use micro log or "double-wide" micro  strips too.   

We'd have a couple, and look at these just as the site says... a "little bigger" micro, so curious.    :)

 

 

 

I didn’t read that description on the website. I simply had the container in my hands. I think if you held one you would reasonably be able to call it a small.

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
3 minutes ago, Korichnovui said:

 

I didn’t read that description on the website. I simply had the container in my hands. I think if you held one you would reasonably be able to call it a small.

 

When I started caching, small was described as "will hold a sandwich".  That cache is a micro.

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
3 hours ago, Harry Dolphin said:

 

When I started caching, small was described as "will hold a sandwich".  That cache is a micro.

 

For me it's always been "about the size of an apple" or alternatively "can fit some swag and trackables" like it says on the Geocaching.com website. This container can. I'll keep the designation as "small".

 

Anyway, I think the point has been made. Some folks are bringing up the issue of "size creep" or whatever it is which really belongs in another thread - I think I remember seeing one somewhere in the general forum before? This container seems to be functional, and I really appreciate the advice I received in considering how to make it so. I'm personally not going to discuss the size any more in this thread.

Edited by Korichnovui
  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
8 hours ago, Harry Dolphin said:

 

When I started caching, small was described as "will hold a sandwich".  That cache is a micro.

 

This is a 200ml Sistema container, so it's twice the volume of what the Help Centre page considers to be the minimum for a Small, but I'd still be pretty hungry even after eating both the sandwiches that would fit inside it.

 

DSC_0070.jpg.ca9bcfbfadaac93c3d9de62c5a7da9e2.jpg

 

Something big enough to hold a decent-sized sandwich would have to be close to being a Regular (minimum 1 litre).

Edited by barefootjeff
  • Upvote 1
  • Funny 3
  • Helpful 1

Share this post


Link to post

Agreeing with a couple of suggestions: Definitely make the hole wider.  I know you've spent quite some time drying it out, but you probably need to get it wet again to verify the correct circumference ... or else just make it more than just wide enough.

 

Lining is a good idea, too.  Construction adhesive (like Liquid Nails) or wood glue would help keeping it in place.  Stuff a bunch of newspaper in the hole to add pressure until it dries.

 

Not sure how big the log/stick is, or whether the container leaves enough head space, but you could make a plug to fit the top of the hole.  Perhaps attach fishing line between the bottom of the plug and the container.  Perhaps attach fishing line from the top of the plug and near the top of the stick/log ... or maybe just a grab-ring attached with a staple nail (fence staple).

Edited by VAVAPAM
newspaper
  • Helpful 2

Share this post


Link to post
5 hours ago, barefootjeff said:

Something big enough to hold a decent-sized sandwich would have to be close to being a Regular (minimum 1 litre).

Keep in mind that most sandwich containers aren't designed to hold "a decent-sized sandwich" that would satisfy an adult's appetite. They seem designed to hold a basic PB&J sandwich for a kid's lunch. And the ones I've seen generally have a volume around half a litre.

 

The typical example containers generally seem to fit in the middle of a size range. For micro, a 35mm film can has a volume of about 35ml (yes, I measured one a while back), which is in the middle of the 0ml to 100ml range. For small, a sandwich keeper has a volume of about 500ml, which is in the middle of the 100ml to 1L range. Most ammo cans (say, .30 cal or .50 cal) seem to be in the range 4-10L, which is in the middle of the 1L to 20L range. The exception is the large size, where the 5 gallon bucket example is at the bottom of the range.

 

Anyway, since these example containers are in the middle of their size ranges, it stands to reason that some in that range will be larger and some will be smaller.

 

Also, back in the day, decon boxes were also examples of a typical small container. They're smaller than sandwich keepers, so I guess you'd be even hungrier if you tried to pack your lunch in one.

  • Helpful 1

Share this post


Link to post

Just another thought: Of course, it again depends on the size of that stick/log ....  Perhaps drill holes all the way through the cavity to allow ventilation, then use wire mesh (screen wire - fiberglass might last longer although it tears more easily) instead of solid metal/plastic to line the cavity (still using construction adhesive/newspaper).  The screen would keep most bugs out and still allow for ventilation.

 

(Is it obvious yet that I'm liking this setup and thinking about how to build one myself?  :D  With your permission.)

 

 

Edited by VAVAPAM
screened

Share this post


Link to post
20 minutes ago, VAVAPAM said:

(Is it obvious yet that I'm liking this setup and thinking about how to build one myself?  :D  With your permission.)

 

The downside that we experienced with a series of this type hide, was sometimes they'd be pitched out of the way (looking for a container, not realizing that's it  ;-) and most got stepped on a coupla times.

 - So make 'em as close to (fill in the blank)-proof as you can.     ;)

  • Upvote 1
  • Funny 1

Share this post


Link to post
16 hours ago, cerberus1 said:

 

The downside that we experienced with a series of this type hide, was sometimes they'd be pitched out of the way (looking for a container, not realizing that's it  ;-) and most got stepped on a coupla times.

 - So make 'em as close to (fill in the blank)-proof as you can.     ;)

Ah, good point; thanks for the insight!

Share this post


Link to post

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0

×
×
  • Create New...