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VAVAPAM

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Everything posted by VAVAPAM

  1. Got a very prompt reply using your suggested path. Thanks, cerberus1 !
  2. Didn't see an applicable topic to select, so wasn't sure if that was the proper channel. Thanks!
  3. In summer of 2017, I had a brief and drama-free message exchange with a new local cacher and their relative from out-of-town (also new to the game) to verify their visit to a cache. I've had no other communication with the local, and one exchange, a few months ago, with the out-of-state relative about setting up a cache in their location. All exchanges were through the GC.com Message Center. Today, out of the blue, I received a message from the local, leading me to believe that their account may have been hacked. -------------- 12:52 PM - This mail is in HTML. Some elements may be ommited in plain text. - Hi Sorry to bother, Do you have an account with amazon?" ‐--------- I did reply - through Message Center - that I thought it an odd question, coming from a geocacher, and asked, point-blank, "Why do you ask?" (I did not answer the question - duh.) I've received no response. As it's impossible for me to say with certainty whether the local is truly inactive, I note that there have been no finds listed on that user account for a few years. It occurred to me that perhaps I should notify somebody at GC.com, in case they would want to investigate, before I contact the out-of-state relative. To whom/where should I direct that notification?
  4. Can someone explain this to me? I took it to mean that Basic members wouldn't be able to see PM-only caches in a Premium member's find list [thus limiting their ability to glean info about those caches].
  5. Oh, I jumped to the conclusion that it could be changed now, due to the Mar 2 announcement. I'll slow down. Thanks for the clarification!
  6. When I attempt to change the date for my Community Celebration Event to after December 31, 2021, I receive the following error message and cannot save the new date. Community Celebration Events must fall between 05/02/2020 and 12/31/2021. GC8M9NQ
  7. Attempting to insert the html text recommended for "decorative images" ( alt="" ) however, when I save it, it's stripped down to just alt . For example, in GC7D1C7 <p style="text-align:center;"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/gs-geo-images/4108883e-86e6-4db9-b6ab-659c81148883.jpg" alt="" /><br /></p> Becomes, upon saving, <p style="text-align:center;"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/gs-geo-images/4108883e-86e6-4db9-b6ab-659c81148883.jpg" alt /><br /></p> This stripping occurs upon saving with all the caches I've edited for decorative images. It DOES NOT occur if there is actual text entered between the quotation marks.
  8. Well before the ensuing discussion on html syntax - informative and interesting; thanks! - I decided that if it were intended to be just - alt - we would have been instructed to type it that way, rather than - alt="" -. Given that I have little extra time these days, I went ahead right then and changed all the "decorative photo" alt descriptions to have actual descriptions [which I could change back, if needed, when the alt dust settled], with the caveat text, "not needed to locate cache". For example, the alt text for the photo for We Don't Need No Stinkin' Lamp Post is <img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/gs-geo-images/4108883e-86e6-4db9-b6ab-659c81148883.jpg" alt="truck crashing into lamp post - not needed for locating cache" /> I'm not sure why "decorative" photos shouldn't be announced by a text reader, and wonder if that takes away from the full experience of the cache page. As in the above example, why shouldn't those using text readers get the opportunity for a chuckle, too? I do remember that some folks find it irksome to have photos in the cache page, though. So at least until the alt="" quirk is straight, consider me an equal opportunity irker!
  9. One thing that I have noticed when adding the HTML for "this is just decorative, ignore" text is that the resulting text after saving removes the "" and just shows alt. What I mean is: alt="text" /> becomes alt /> I have tried this on a number of my caches, and the results are the same. Does this matter? Example: https://coord.info/GC777D2
  10. Thank you checking it out, and for that complete description of what's going on there!
  11. (This is a copy of the Topic I started in "How do I...", and Max and 99 thankfully directed me here.) I applaud HQ's accessibility efforts with their recent suggestion for alt text for photos that matter - vs. "decorative" ones - on the cache page. (I did wonder how the COs with lots of puzzles dependent on images would react, but that's not my situation at all.) I really want to get this right, but how does one test whether it is without a screen reader? For example, on the [currently disabled] cache GC75MXW , I edited the photo to add a description, and it does show the description ... but that's only if you go to the gallery... and I don't know if the screen reader would read that description. I did edit the HTML to include a short description ... though it is a very detailed photo, so I'm not sure how helpful it's going to be. I work in Mozilla, and when I inspected the photo it did show the alt text; however there was a warning for accessibility. Ummm yeah. Greek to me. Really, I wouldn't worry too much about that, except that the photo contains a clue to a hint (and it's JUST a hint) and it would seem unfair for somebody not to be able to get that info. Suggestions on how to overcome this obstacle ... or even if it is one?
  12. I applaud HQ's accessibility efforts with their recent suggestion for alt text for photos that matter - vs. "decorative" ones - on the cache page. (I did wonder how the COs with lots of puzzles dependent on images would react, but that's not my situation at all.) I really want to get this right, but how does one test whether it is without a screen reader? For example, on the [currently disabled] cache GC75MXW , I edited the photo to add a description, and it does show the description ... but that's only if you go to the gallery... and I don't know if the screen reader would read that description. I did edit the HTML to include a short description ... though it is a very detailed photo, so I'm not sure how helpful it's going to be. I work in Mozilla, and when I inspected the photo it did show the alt text; however there was a warning for accessibility. Ummm yeah. Greek to me. Really, I wouldn't worry too much about that, except that the photo contains a clue to a hint (and it's JUST a hint) and it would seem unfair for somebody not to be able to get that info. Suggestions on how to overcome this obstacle ... or even if it is one?
  13. Please be sure to place the trackable IN a cache. Leaving it outside, near a cache leaves it unprotected from weather and non-cachers who won't know what know what it is or what to do with it. It also might draw attention to the cache itself, leaving the cache vulnerable to discovery. If the trackable won't fit, wait until you find another cache that will work. If you don't think you'll find any caches big enough, take it to a local event (which IS a cache, so the trackable can be "dropped" - folks at the event can help you, too). If none of those options are available, contact the trackable owner - click on "Message this owner" at the top of the trackable's page - to see how they'd like you to proceed. (After all, it belongs to them.)
  14. Yes, I did consider disabling my caches until the virus threat is past. I considered this while on an interstate trip (gasp!) to my little cottage in The Middle of Nowhere, where there were no reported cases of covid-19 in the entire state at the time of my travel. I was accompanied by my daughter, who is immune-compromised. I wore disposable gloves when refueling and we both wore disposable gloves when using the restroom - one stop in each direction. I chose for us to not hunt for any caches along the way or during our stay, and brought with us all supplies, including groceries and TP (though I wish I'd brought the remaining TP home; fie on you TP hoarders, wherever you are). As I suspected would happen, the nearby town that hosts a major university - on Spring Break at the time of our visit - announced a first case that exploded to several more the day of our departure. That set me up for thinking about my own caches at home. Like many have mentioned, most local cachers have found my caches, so the visits have dropped considerably anyway, with a few traveling cachers finding them on their quest to fill in counties. In addition, our area has not had any reported cases of covid-19. On one side, I can buy that because, well, seriously nobody comes here unless there's a NASCAR race. Fan attendance has been cancelled for that. On the other side, the testing is so restricted that unless you're almost dying and need hospitalization, you won't meet the criteria for testing ... leaving a big question mark about whether there are cases or not. After considering all these factors, including my misgivings about hunting caches while traveling, I decided that I would NOT disable my caches. I'm going to take this opportunity to spiff up my caches (look, we're not in a highly-, very-, or even somewhat-populated area), using the disposable gloves that I always keep at hand anyway - and spraying down the cache with Clorox, which I always have on hand at home anyway. I haven't decided whether I will mention this activity or not. Whether it will make a difference I don't know. Of note: This area in my state has no reported cases of covid-19 (as of this writing). I am a solo cacher. In my area, getting out to most caches would not involve a consideration of others' proximity to me. Often, my mental health depends on being able to go hunt caches. That may seem weird to some, unless they've experienced the cabin fever of 24/7 caregiving. I do appreciate that protecting others will protect yourself, and the wish to remove the draw of an unfound cache, but I do not want to extinguish an outlet for others needing an escape from the tedium of isolation - which can actually come at any time, not just now. On a somewhat unrelated note, I simply signed in to see if the folks I regularly see posting were still doing so. Seems to be. YAY! Ya'll stay healthy, ya hear?
  15. Most often, I will state some sort of relative measure for the cache, especially if it's a small, because of the varying shapes that can hold a liter (as well-depicted by barefootjeff). Pelicans can be small and accept some flat TBs, but some might expect to be able to leave a different shaped one. For that reason, I'll use a golf ball as my depth description. "It's shallow; a golf ball would be too tall." Or for others more shaped like the bottle, "The opening is about 3.5 inches in diameter". It never occurred to me that I might have to state, for a large: "A bowling ball would not be too tall." I'd definitely have to go discover a bowling ball TB if it rested in one of my caches! Speaking of Large size caches ... I haven't seen anybody bring up the fact that 5 gallons is LESS than 20 liters, but I'm guessing most would be thinking along the lines of a 5-gallon bucket being a Large. Yes? This came to mind when I was contemplating using a 5-gallon bucket (hidden within a host) as the cache. Really, would you be irked to find such a cache listed as a Regular? Would you be expecting something smaller?
  16. I'm generally not so good with New Year Resolutions - too specific, and what do you do if you fulfill them early? - so I came up with the idea of having a New Year Theme. My 2020 theme is going to be "Git 'Er Done!" So, for my 2020 Geocaching Goal: I will NOT step foot in a home improvement or hobby store (where new cache ideas broadside me right and left) until I've cleared my geoworkbench of caches-in-progress. Git 'er done. That's the most specific I can get.
  17. That's a good point to consider, and it prompted me to fully investigate this state's "attractive nuisance policy" further. Although it applies to children (who are not expected to reason possible dangers - adults are), I believe that my plan to have said items away from normal traffic, hidden and LOCKED will prevent liability on that front. I'd always planned on including the disclaimer about choosing to do caches at one's own risk. I make "maintenance rounds" on all my caches frequently. Certainly, the equipment would be checked for viability regularly.
  18. Lived in a different state, but parallel to MS (Alabama). Usually, February is still cool; March starts springtime. I mention this because, just like "your" snakes, they're cold-blooded and you won't find as much activity when it's below 60 F. That far south, they don't really hibernate but do slow down, and burrow in ... so look out for hollow logs, and other likely spots for burrowing. Just remember that they're not in full hibernation; they're awake and usually coiled - so can strike quickly. If it's a sunny day, you might find them out sunning - probably just like you do up there. You've seen cottonmouths. They hang out mostly near water, so also become familiar with copperheads, which I found more often even than rattlers. They like brush/leaf or deadfall piles. None are as aggressive as cottonmouths. Pretty good site here: http://www.snake-removal.com/cottonmouth.html . I like it because it not only gives info on habitat and habits, it also includes a range map and links to snakes that look similar. Hope that helps.
  19. EEK! I just wanted to see what the application looked like - didn't realize that clicking on the button would automagically enter me. I'm not sure yet if I can host an event, so didn't mean to be entered. Is there a way to un-do my entry?
  20. You're going to need a big pocket. 12"; bolted down; nano at the bottom with next stage clue:
  21. Gotta love a good multi-tool! Looks like your dexterity with the chopsticks would render that a T1 for you! Thanks for that feedback.
  22. Search for "lock de-icer". (Lots quieter - and cheaper - than a heat gun. ) It's often used for thawing ski racks, garage/mailbox doors ... and locks.
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