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Safety cache


durkal
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I went on my first search today

 

I went on my first search today, and was directed to the Northern bank of the Murray River at Tocumwal NSW.

I followed the directions to the letter, 3rd tree from old bridge toward the new bridge. Unfortunately the "cache"was hidden under a rock that was one of hundreds dropped in place to prevent erosion.

 

I was directed 3 m down this 40 deg bank of rocks, I gingerly got my self down to approximately where the cache was supposed to be, when a rock I was standing on rolled causing me to lose my footing. I spun around fell backwards and got a nasty knock on the head, and numerous bruises. I was unfit to continue the search and moved on. 2 hours later I discovered I had lost my wallet. Back we went again and my wife found the wallet where I fell.

 

My plea is to be very aware of how safe the surroundings and site that you place the cache.

 

I have abandoned this search and would like to warn others about this one, you could break you arms, legs, or worse. This first adventure taught me "safety" comes first.

Edited by durkal
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Wow another Aussie.not only that in NSW to. Anyway you will probably find many caches like that, most times in the description its will give you imformation about the terrain especially if its not geokid friendly, we have one around my area where ones on the edge of a cliff, many times walking around to the bottom and back up again to find it, i have found with most gps'susually about 10mtrs out at bad times so getting the location can be difficult especially with caches like yours. I believe the person placing the cache should warm other about the dangers as in your case, broken bones etc :) but good luck don't give up and try again at a later date.

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I went on my first search today

 

I went on my first search today, and was directed to the Northern bank of the Murray River at Tocumwal NSW.

I followed the directions to the letter, 3rd tree from old bridge toward the new bridge. Unfortunately the "cache"was hidden under a rock that was one of hundreds dropped in place to prevent erosion.

 

I was directed 3 m down this 40 deg bank of rocks, I gingerly got my self down to approximately where the cache was supposed to be, when a rock I was standing on rolled causing me to lose my footing. I spun around fell backwards and got a nasty knock on the head, and numerous bruises. I was unfit to continue the search and moved on. 2 hours later I discovered I had lost my wallet. Back we went again and my wife found the wallet where I fell.

 

My plea is to be very aware of how safe the surroundings and site that you place the cache.

 

I have abandoned this search and would like to warn others about this one, you could break you arms, legs, or worse. This first adventure taught me "safety" comes first.

 

Could you please post the GC number? Did you post a DNF?

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Sorry to hear that you got hurt. I would say that if you arrive at a cache location and don't feel the location is safe (for whatever reason), you should just move on to the next one and log a DNF (if desired). The perceived safety level and the degree of the physical challenge required to retrieve the cache is in the eye of the beholder. So my plea would be "to be very aware of how safe the surroundings and site that you search for the cache."

Edited by Motorcycle_Mama
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Sorry to hear that you got hurt. I would say that if you arrive at a cache location and don't feel the location is safe (for whatever reason), you should just move on to the next one and log a DNF (if desired). The perceived safety level and the degree of the physical challenge required to retrieve the cache is in the eye of the beholder. So my plea would be "to be very aware of how safe the surroundings and site that you search for the cache."

 

I most mostly agree. At the end of the day, personal safety is the responsibility of the individual seeking the cache at the time. However, that doesn't mean that others, including the CO shouldn't provide information when there may be safety issues when retrieving a cache.

 

In some cases there may be safety issues that the "eye of the beholder" does not adequately assess. For example, there is a boat accessible only cache about 50 miles from me that doesn't mention anything about the potential dangers of seeking the cache. It also includes a photo of the CO and a friend in a canoe (sans PFDs or helmets) going down a section of the creek the looks very similar to a low head dam. Do a search on low head dam and you'll one story after another of drownings that occurred on these man made river features. What makes them so dangerous is that they appear benign. Those that understand the dangers often refer them as "drowning machines".

 

I found a cache yesterday that was along a nice well worn trail in an area where a bunch of new caches have appeared. About 200' from the cache, and again very close to ground zero there are a couple of spots where lots of erosion has occurred resulting in a cliff with a near vertical drop 250' to the riverbed below. In one spot the drop off is less than 10' from the trail. I could just imagine a family of cachers going for this one and a kid skipping down the trail ahead of their parents, tripping over an exposed root (there are lots of them) and going over the cliff. I posted a note about the cliffs in my log and got an email message from one of the regulars here (and a parent of small children) thanking me for the information.

 

In yet another example, I once arrived a a cache location only to finds about a foot of snow on the very steep bank where the cache was located. I posted my DNF indicating that I wasn't going to attempt going down for the cache without a rope. My posting would hopefully inform others thinking of going for that cache that conditions were currently not ideal for seeking that cache. The DNF log was inexplicably deleted.

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...My plea is to be very aware of how safe the surroundings and site that you place the cache....

 

My pleas is to be very aware of your own safety and know your own limits. Rocks move. Rock hopping is the most brutal form of hiking I've ever done perhaps tied with hiking in a recent lava flow.

 

Our world is what it is. I've long since decided that cache owners didn't get hurt placing the cache, which means getting hurt is optional on my part as a finder.

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... At the end of the day, personal safety is the responsibility of the individual seeking the cache at the time. However, that doesn't mean that others, including the CO shouldn't provide information when there may be safety issues when retrieving a cache.

 

In some cases there may be safety issues that the "eye of the beholder" does not adequately assess. ....

 

I agree. If you know there is a danger of some type 'above and beyond' whatever the heck that means by all means the owner should put it on the cache page. I would never, ever require this though for different reasons. Part of those different reasons is your eye of the beholder issue. Another real thing.

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You assume all risks when attempting to find a cache. Each cache is rated for difficulty of terrain and terrain with a high degree of difficulty may well be treacherous, with steep slopes, loose rocks, cliffs, scree, sharp objects and other potential dangers.

 

There are many geocachers who enjoy challenging (and sometimes dangerous) terrain. Geocaching is an outdoor sport with the inherent dangers of most outdoors sports. The great thing about it is that there is something for everyone from a parent pushing a baby carraige to the daredevil types. Its up to you to assess the situation and turn back if you are uncomfortable.

Edited by briansnat
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No smilie or cache "prize" is worth any injury. Cachers should not seek any cache with which they are not comfortable or for which they are not prepared physically, physcologicaly, emotionally and/or eqipmentally (is that a word??). The right shoes is sometimes the necesary equipment. Walk away if you asses any likelihood of injury.

 

Cache placers should write up an adequate enough description so that cachers are at least minimally prepared to get the cache when they arrive. Either through attributes, D/T ratings or wordy descriptions. Seekers should read those descriptions careful before attempting.

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I think this reiterates the importantce of logging DNFs when appropriate. In the OPs case and DNF log will help prepare future seekers (as mentioned by others).

 

All too often some cache owners get offended when a DNF is posted. A real shame really. All logs (with the rare exception of a loose cannon) provide the community with that seekers experience. If it resulted in a DNF that doesn't mean there's something wrong with the cache. If there are 4 of 5 DNFs in a row then it may indicate a problem. CO's shouldn't go round just knocking DNF's off their caches IMHO.

 

I've left a few unattempted because I arrived unprepared. If I didn't make an attempt I won't DNF the cache but I might consider posting a note or contacting the CO if I felt something was missing from the cache description.

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I think this reiterates the importantce of logging DNFs when appropriate. In the OPs case and DNF log will help prepare future seekers (as mentioned by others).

 

All too often some cache owners get offended when a DNF is posted. A real shame really. All logs (with the rare exception of a loose cannon) provide the community with that seekers experience. If it resulted in a DNF that doesn't mean there's something wrong with the cache. If there are 4 of 5 DNFs in a row then it may indicate a problem. CO's shouldn't go round just knocking DNF's off their caches IMHO.

 

I've left a few unattempted because I arrived unprepared. If I didn't make an attempt I won't DNF the cache but I might consider posting a note or contacting the CO if I felt something was missing from the cache description.

I believe that all DNFs are appropriate. 1/1 or 5/5 doesn't matter. If you go out and hunt for the cache you should post your log online. It doesn't matter what type of log you post but you should post a log. If the cache owner doesn't understand or appreciate your log you have an educational opportunity.

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There are 2 now that I have done that put me in gravity danger... Check out GC42B0 - Royal Pain, it is set about 80 feet up a vertical drop that you have to climb...

 

One I am stumped on now in my local county is in a fallen tree (supposedly) with a steep decline, so the farther out the tree you walk, the deeper the drop. Could not find it so read past logs and seen a special theme like:

 

'Different/Interesting Container', 'I didnt realize that was it until..' 'This one can set in plain sight and still be interesting' I studied all those, went back, and saw a snake setting on a branch, so I added up all the clues and came to the conclusion IT MUST BE A FAKE SNAKE... I was wrong... I could not quite reach it so I poked it with a stick and it started MOVING!!! :lol:

 

"OK I setting that one off til winter!!!" But being local, I will probably try and try again, or just break down and ask for help fro the cache owner.

 

Correction: ROYAL PAIN GC42B0 Used to be up a 60 foot drop, they must have moved it down, check out logs before September 4 '07, it also seems the place has been trashed where it used to be very nice.

Edited by rockey_f_squirrell
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