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AHHHH!


Deannolastname
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Sure...

 

First - take a deep cleansing breath and relax. That feels better doesn't it??

 

OK - a few hints and tips.....

Look for caches with a difficulty of 2 or less for your fist few caches. Stick with regular sized caches for your first few. Stick to areas you are familar with. Look for anything out of place or unusual. Look for unusual piles of sticks, grass, leaves, rocks, sand, etc. Feel where you cannot look. Think vertical, not all caches are on the ground. Look up or at eye level. Look for traces of previous searches to zero in on the spot. Think like hider - where would you put a container? Look for things too new, too old, too perfect, not like the others. Be prepared to not find the cache more often then you think.

 

Keep in mind that the general accuracy of your unit is around 20-25 feet so be prepared to search a radius of at least that from where your unit says ground zero is. Sometimes a bit more - often less.

 

Most of all - have fun!!

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Another thing you can do is do a Google search for Geocache containers. That will give you some idea of the different types and sizes that may be in your area. I've found everything from a magnetic bolt on a sign to an ammo can in a hollow tree stump. Pay close attention to sizes on the cache page and in the description. If you are in an urban area, did you know that those metal skirts on lamposts aren't bolted down? They can be lifted up.

 

Search the site for groups that are local to you and get in touch with the members. Try attending events, knowing cachers will help you know their cache style and that will help you understand their hiding methods.

 

Above all, stop looking when it gets to be work. If it isn't fun, then go to another cache for the time being. Good luck!

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Just remember that geocaching is a learning experience. So in other words the more you do it the more experience you will gain and it will come much easier.

 

If interested I have a whole series of videos for newer geocachers. The one in particular that may help you would be called "A Day of Geocaching with Headhardhat". It will give you a well rounded set of example of different types of geocaches and what to look out for. There are dozens now of others that can also help. Enjoy.

 

Go to http://www.geosnippits.com

 

or search for headhardhat geosnippits on youtube..

 

-HHH :yikes:

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Just remember that geocaching is a learning experience. So in other words the more you do it the more experience you will gain and it will come much easier.

 

If interested I have a whole series of videos for newer geocachers. The one in particular that may help you would be called "A Day of Geocaching with Headhardhat". It will give you a well rounded set of example of different types of geocaches and what to look out for. There are dozens now of others that can also help. Enjoy.

 

Go to http://www.geosnippits.com

 

or search for headhardhat geosnippits on youtube..

 

-HHH :unsure:

Greetings! A couple posts above this one is a post from HeadHardHat. There's one thing he forgot to mention. Apparently he's a man that doesn't toot his own horn very often. What he forgot to mention is that his tutorial videos are not only educational, but they're also fun to watch. Yep, he actually makes it enjoyable to learn! They seem to usually be around 9 or 10 minutes long so you don't have a chance to get bored. I highly recommend his videos as a great source of information for us newer cachers. I say forget Obama I want HeadHardHat for Prez!!!!! Check out his videos and I'll bet you'll become a fan too. Oh the videos are free to watch so I guarantee you can't find a better deal than that!

Edited by Michigan Cacheman
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Greetings from across the big pond over here in Wisconsin, and welcome to what is sure to be your new found obsession!! We were all noobs once, so don't feel foolish.

 

I know you've gotten alot of good advice already, but here's another idea: check geocaching.com for events in your area, and attend one of those. You'll meet lots of other cachers, and the experienced ones are usually more than happy to let you tag along and show you the ropes. You can check for events in your area by clicking on you name at the top of the first page, then on the next page click on where it says "Newest caches in Michigan". The first bunch listed will always be a series of "event" caches. Hopefully there will be one titled "Geocaching 101" or "Introduction to Geocaching". These are classes that are put on by experienced cachers that will show you everything you need to know to get started.

 

Most cachers I've met are friendly folks, so don't be afraid to introduce yourself and ask questions. They're usually glad to help. Who knows? Maybe you'll even make some new friends!! Whatever you do, don't give up!! Remember, you're starting out during a snow covered winter, and that can be a difficult time to locate a lot of caches, with the snow cover and all. Hopefully it should get at least a little easier once old man winter disappears.

 

Good Luck and Happy Caching!!

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Hi, we're also newbies. We started twds the end of last wk (half term). Think we are now on almost 50/50 but it can be extremely frustrating. Try to think of the positives if you don't find anything. In our case it's made us go out when normally we wouldn't, we go farther afield in the New Forest and and as someone that suffers from vertigo I still went up with the family to the top of Golden Cap near Charmouth. Keep hunting it will be worth it.

 

Edit: this is all new to me and the funny green face was regarding the vertigo. lol

Edited by the77club
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Welcome to both of you!

 

I recently started Geocaching on my own earlier this month and have had a fair amount of success, but only because my dad brought me on a few of his excursions when he started 4 or 5 years ago.

 

Attention to detail is vital, as is perseverance. If you get stuck or if your GPS unit is jumping around too much, set it on the ground, look around for a minute or two and then return to it once it has a better hold of the signal. Repeat this as much as needed. Mine has often put me right on top of the cache (literally) with a 2 ft distance reading! Even then I had to kneel on a rock and bend down to hang over the side to find the cache, lol.

 

I will probably be flamed for this suggestion, but if you use the Google Maps tool on GC.com, you can zoom in on the cache you are trying to find and switch to a Satellite view which can give you a very good idea of where the cache is hiding, such as which tree, which bench, which light pole. Granted, this removes half of the fun, but there's still the other half of actually wrapping your hand around it.

 

Oh, one last thing.... beware of squirrels.... trust me ;)

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I will probably be flamed for this suggestion, but if you use the Google Maps tool on GC.com, you can zoom in on the cache you are trying to find and switch to a Satellite view which can give you a very good idea of where the cache is hiding, such as which tree, which bench, which light pole. Granted, this removes half of the fun, but there's still the other half of actually wrapping your hand around it.

I thought of that myself!!! lol good suggestion!!!

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...

I will probably be flamed for this suggestion, but if you use the Google Maps tool on GC.com, you can zoom in on the cache you are trying to find and switch to a Satellite view which can give you a very good idea of where the cache is hiding, such as which tree, which bench, which light pole. Granted, this removes half of the fun, but there's still the other half of actually wrapping your hand around it.

 

...

Doesn't always do anything for you - try my home zipcode - 69336. Not enough resolution to tell a VW from an 18 wheeler.

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Doesn't always do anything for you - try my home zipcode - 69336. Not enough resolution to tell a VW from an 18 wheeler.

 

In most towns it does!!! I have a couple that I will try today!!! I have a good idea where they are and I didn't even think of looking there!!! (BTW, I don't have a GPS) If you know the landscape it makes it a lot easier!

 

I'll post if i find them, hope I can get out there before the snow flies!!!

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Thanks for the help guys! I still didn't find any! :D I think there was too much snow!! I'll try for a couple others!! :)

 

I'm new too and though I have one find, the hides that really interest me are west of here in the mountains.. mostly under several feet of snow yet at the moment. Give it some time for the weather to improve and I think you'll find that it isn't quite so hard as it seems.

 

Also you are definitely making it harder on yourself by going with no GPS... not impossible, but it's going to make for a longer learning curve.

Edited by rapriebe
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....... Also you are definitely making it harder on yourself by going with no GPS... not impossible, but it's going to make for a longer learning curve.

 

Perhaps.. but if you can accurately interpret all the data on the satellite image it's not really much harder than using a GPS unless you go the next step and try to do multis by calculating distance and direction and plotting the next stage in the field. That usually is somewhere between very difficult and nearly impossible.

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...

I will probably be flamed for this suggestion, but if you use the Google Maps tool on GC.com, you can zoom in on the cache you are trying to find and switch to a Satellite view which can give you a very good idea of where the cache is hiding, such as which tree, which bench, which light pole. Granted, this removes half of the fun, but there's still the other half of actually wrapping your hand around it.

 

...

Doesn't always do anything for you - try my home zipcode - 69336. Not enough resolution to tell a VW from an 18 wheeler.

 

Wow.. that's terrible. What you have at the 1000 meter scale is far worse than I have at the 100 meter scale. Note to self: No GPSless caching in Western Nebraska. :D

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Dang!!! no luck!!! Well thanks for all the tips and help guys, I'll get one pretty soon here!!!

I feel like this is stating the obvious, but a GPS receiver will probably make a big difference when it comes to actually finding the cache. Unless it's completely out in the open with only a few obvious hiding places, I think you'll find getting to ground-zero with the GPS receiver and then knowing that the cache is within a 30' radius or so can make a huge difference in terms of narrowing down the possibilities. Not that you can't find caches without a GPS receiver, but it will make it quite a bit more difficult, especially if you're new and not sure what to look for.

 

Take this cache that I found recently, and which had very good coordinates. Here it is with the coordinates plugged into Google Earth:

 

google-earth-1.jpg

 

The actual cache location is about 50 feet from where Google Earth shows it to be (the gray cross-hairs). The red circle shows an approximate 50 foot radius from the location as shown by Google Earth. It could take an hour or more, even in this small park, to thoroughly search for a small cache container within that radius. Having a GPSr pointing you in the right direction, letting you know if you're getting closer or further away, etc. can make all the difference in helping to hone in on the right place to look.

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