Jump to content

Garmin Colorado


kezlu
Followers 9

Recommended Posts

Please, can you explain it.

I thought a 300 with a 8 GB SD card is cheaper and has THE SAME FEATURES compared to a 400-model

I need special maps which are not included in the 400.

No, it's not the same. Assuming you do need the maps that are in the 400x model you buy, you then have a Colorado with these maps, and still have the SD card reader free for a card with other maps.

If you get a 300, you have to use some of the space on that card for the maps you got internally on the 400x. Even if there's still space on the card for more maps, it doesn't help, if you want some other maps, that are available on pre-programmed cards only. That kind of maps don't run from any other card than the one they were delivered on.

 

On a 400x, such a card easily co-exists with the pre-loaded maps. On a 300, you have to select a part of the maps you are missing from the 400, install them in internal memory, take your SD card out and put the pre-programmed card in the card slot.

 

Doable, but less convenient. So it's not the same, even if it still works.

Link to comment

ok, thanks.

And my last question for this day:

 

Is it still not possible to save tracks and waypoints on a SD card and also load it again from the SD card (a feature which the magellan-explorist-serie had already some years ago)

 

The limitation for the colorado seems to be the same like the gpsmap-series, which also could not read tracks and waypoints from the Card. (only store/log the track to the µSD-Card - but not load it again)

Link to comment

OK - thanks for the info.

If i never will use pre-programmed cards - is there a difference between 300 and 400?

I don't believe so based on the information I have been able to get regarding the Colorado series. I have no foreseeable need for Garmin's pre-programmed SD cards. Apersson850 provides some excellent information and his info confirms my beliefs.

 

I just ordered an 8GB SDHC card ($36 from meritline.com) which I can use in my camera... or use in the Colorado, if possible. I plan to get the Colorado 300 and load City Navigator North America NT, and Topo 2008 North America onto the 8 GB SDHC card.

Edited by Barrikady
Link to comment

 

It appears that the marine units (400i, 400c) have global satellite imagery (not a lot of detail though), so it looks like the hardware can display raster imagery, raising the possibility of using aerial photos somewhere down the line. I'll be asking Garmin about this at CES next week, but don't expect them to disclose any future plans. They're a tight lipped bunch when it comes to that.

 

The emphasized part above is what would keep me from buying this...if I bought one my luck would be that in Spring/Summer they would come with the NEW 400r (or whatever) that could do the raster images...

Link to comment

I haven't tried putting track logs back into the Colorado yet.

 

But as far as saving the logs, the Colorado doesn't save them on the card. As it has a lot of internal memory, it uses the same archiving method as the Zumo 550.

 

That means that as soon as you reach 9800 out of the 10000 possible track log points, it saves one track. The tracks are broken when you turn the unit off, for example, so it's very rare that all points belong to one single track.

When that track has been removed, this is repeated as long as there are more than 8000 points in the active log.

Note that this describes how it works on the Zumo. If exactly the same number of points are used here, I don't know. But the principle is the same. These automatically archived tracks then end up in consequtively numbered gpx files in the \Garmin\GPX\Archive folder on the Colorado.

 

You can also save tracks manually. You then show the unit, on the map, where the part you want to save starts and ends. Give the track a name, and it's saved. After that, you can use the Where to? menu and ask for guidance along the saved track.

 

After doing this, I noticed that the saved track ended up as a gpx file in the \Garmin\GPX folder. So I made a track in Mapsource, gave it a name and sent it to the GPS. That worked fine. It's now available in the list of saved tracks, and can be made into a route to follow, just like if it had been saved on the unit itself.

So this means that you can indeed get a track back into the Colorado, but not using the unit itself. It it's outside the active track, you have to use a computer to store it in the proper folder on the Colorado.

Also, you can't see a saved track on the map, unless you make a route out of it. It's only the active track that's visible on the map.

Link to comment

I don't know. But why should you?

I think you, like many other users of traditional outdoor GPS units, haven't realized what an internal memory like what you have on a nüvi can do for you. There are now half a million caches in the world. With a reasonable amount of information for each, you can store them all in the internal memory of a Colorado 300.

Link to comment

Anyone know if the Colorado can be set to log the track simultaneously to the SD card? (as on the 60/76x series)

 

Also, on the Colorado, does "saving" (archive ?)a track limit / reduce the number of trackpoints per track to 500 and discard some of the info? (elevation,speed,etc) (again like on the 60/76x series)

Edited by Grasscatcher
Link to comment

I don't know. But why should you?

I think you, like many other users of traditional outdoor GPS units, haven't realized what an internal memory like what you have on a nüvi can do for you. There are now half a million caches in the world. With a reasonable amount of information for each, you can store them all in the internal memory of a Colorado 300.

 

Thanks for the thoughts and info. As I said, I will be watching the release of the Colorado closely. I think that Garmin may have found a convert.

Link to comment

On the Garmin site you can select a couple of models and compare them, and it will show you what's different.

 

For the 300 it says "Internal Memory: 384MB".

For the 400t is says "Internal Memory: Yes". :rolleyes:

 

Is "Yes" a typo for some number bigger than 384MB?

It's not a typo, rather it is a way for Garmin to indicate there is more memory in the device, but without stating exactly how much more memory is in in the device.

 

Since all of the 400 series of the Colorado have pre-installed maps built into the GPSr, they must have a greater amount of memory built into the unit in order to be able to load the pre-installed maps. I'm guessing that the 400 series have between 3 and 4 GB's of memory built into each GPSr.

Edited by Barrikady
Link to comment

I think a much better solution for Garmin would be to make one Colorado unit with 4GB of internal memmory. Then sell maps separatly.

 

Now all the dealers and shops need to stock 4 units!!!!

 

Do not ship DVD, but only keys. Then let user downloads maps from Garmin.

Link to comment

Anyone know if the Colorado can be set to log the track simultaneously to the SD card? (as on the 60/76x series)

 

Also, on the Colorado, does "saving" (archive ?) a track limit / reduce the number of trackpoints per track to 500 and discard some of the info? (elevation,speed,etc) (again like on the 60/76x series)

If you read my description above about how track archiving is done on the Colorado, you'll notice that it's no longer like the 60/76 CSx models, but the more advanced method found in the Zumo 550.

There's no need to log anything to the card. There's more than enough internal memory for that.

I haven't deleted anything from the archives on my Zumo, since it got that function in the beginning of April 2007. Today, it's filled to 84%, so it lasts almost a year. Still, it's in the car and on all the time, wherever I go.

 

When the Zumo/Colorado archives a track, automatically or manually, the whole track is saved. No data reduction at all.

 

If you have a 400t , then you would only be able to view your tracks on the unit ? with my 76cs I return home and view my trip on topo 2008 and print it out, I don,t understand the advanage of pre loaded maps except for Garmin,s stocks.
That's true, that's the limit of the pre-loaded map concept.

But it's good for Garmin's stock, in such a way that there seems to be many potential users our there, that wants units that are as simple as possible to use. Pre-loaded maps are easier than installing yourself, that's for sure.

The same goes for Jotne's comment. I'm pretty sure they've surveyed the market, and as they are most certainly trying to catch new GPS users as well, not just old veterans, they are trying to make it as simple as possible for them.

Edited by apersson850
Link to comment

I've heard nothing about any such models here. Probably will not be any at the time of introduction in the shops, at least.

Maybe because Garmin themselves don't make topographic maps for Europe. It's the various importers that do that, so it's a separate business. Very likely that they don't have any deals with them, that will allow such models. If nothing else, it would look very expensive in the box, when the high map cost is added to the unit. Would perhaps deter first-time users too much. Better have them getting the GPS, then later shell out a lot of Euro for maps, when they realize that they really, really do want them.

Edited by apersson850
Link to comment

Just got off the REI website to see the prices and noticed this little tidbit in the description:

Operates on two AA batteries; built-in NiMH charging via included USB or car adapter (sold separately)

 

That would be sweet if it could charge the NiMH batteries while plugged in. Don't see anything about that on the Garmin Website, wonder if it's a typo by REI?

Edited by sanramonhunter
Link to comment

I doubt that. As it can be used with alkaline and lithium batteries as well, not only NiMH, charging could be a fire hazard. The manual says nothing about charging.

I have some semi-charged NiMH in my unit. After plugging the USB cable in for a while, the battery gauge is up one notch. But that could just as well being allowing the batteries to rest.

I'll let it run on external power a bit longer, and check again later.

Link to comment

Any word on if the custom transparent maps we make will still work?

 

Will it show shaded relief for the custom maps?

 

Am I correct you can install some maps on a card and some in internal memory? That would be great as you could put trail maps that are updated regularly in internal memory so you don't have to reload all your maps.

 

apersson850 how did you get one already???

Link to comment

Any word on if the custom transparent maps we make will still work?

 

Will it show shaded relief for the custom maps?

 

Am I correct you can install some maps on a card and some in internal memory? That would be great as you could put trail maps that are updated regularly in internal memory so you don't have to reload all your maps.

 

apersson850 how did you get one already???

I think Garmin has a different 'Beta Testing' model than Magellan. . . ;^)

 

Norm

Link to comment

On the Garmin site you can select a couple of models and compare them, and it will show you what's different.

 

For the 300 it says "Internal Memory: 384MB".

For the 400t is says "Internal Memory: Yes". :anicute:

 

Is "Yes" a typo for some number bigger than 384MB?

It's not a typo, rather it is a way for Garmin to indicate there is more memory in the device, but without stating exactly how much more memory is in in the device.

 

Since all of the 400 series of the Colorado have pre-installed maps built into the GPSr, they must have a greater amount of memory built into the unit in order to be able to load the pre-installed maps. I'm guessing that the 400 series have between 3 and 4 GB's of memory built into each GPSr.

 

I am just trying to wrap my head around the memory thing here. REI's specs for the Colorado states 256 mb memory. If I am understanding this right, you are saying the unit has the capacicty of 3 or 4 GBs, but after the maps are loaded the user is left with 256mb. Does this sound right? I apologize for my ignorance, but I have been solely a Magellan user and am seriously considering coming over to the dark side :drama:

Link to comment

I wonder what the pre-loaded model options will be in Europe? We currently pay a fortune for topo maps (eg, the CD set for the whole of France costs over $1000).

Yes, if you live for example in GENF/Switzerland/Europe - you need:

...

a preloaded map with Topo France

a preloaded map with CN Europe

a preloaded map for Topo Italy

a preloaded map for the Gardasee Topo

and a preloaded map of Topo Swiss

 

HAPPY Discjokey ! :anicute:

 

And you never are able to plan your trips on the computer with mapsource.

 

Garmin is going the wrong way with that idea :drama:

Edited by freeday
Link to comment

Is the wheel on the Colorado free spinning, or an electronic one that that you just move a little ways to the left or right?

 

If free spining, I'm concerned this is going to be the weak link in the new GPS as friction (hence wear) will be generated at the 'axle'. And zooming in on the picture shows a gap behind the wheel that is going to trap dust and small particles. Will the wheel come off for cleaning?

Link to comment
Any word on if the custom transparent maps we make will still work?

 

Will it show shaded relief for the custom maps?

 

...

 

I asked Garmin the very same question a couple of days ago. But they never got back to me on this one. I also contacted Stan (the author of cgpsmapper) and he said he would consider adding the DEM feature in his program. So, maybe we have some hope.

 

Mike

Link to comment

I don't have any Colorado with pre-loaded maps, but as the organisation of memory is similar to the nüvis, which indeed have pre-loaded maps, I think it's safe to assume that it's the same here.

Which then implies that a unit, which needs perhaps 3.2 GB of map memory, for a large topographic map, will be equipped with a 4 GB flash memory.

Parts is used for these maps, and other parts are used for various system files, images, icons, track logs, custom POIs and the like. What remains can be used for maps the user wants to install.

Some has to be left free for system use, when connecting to a computer, updating firmware and such.

 

For the Swiss example above, it's obvious that only a Colorado 300, with a fairly large SD card (and an owner with a fairly large wallet) comes into question. You can still install maps in internal as well as card memory. In my unit, I have Friluftskartan in internal memory together with City Navigator Europe and North America on the card.

 

The wheel runs as many turns as you like. Obviously, I haven't had mine long enough to ruin it yet, so I can't speak about the durability.

 

I had the cable plugged in for a few more hours. The batteries didn't charge any further, as could be expected.

Link to comment

There is the program gmaptools which can get preloaded (on microSD card) maps back into mapsource as long as you are able to save the gmapsupp.img or gmapsupprom onto your harddisk, though I don't know how good this works. It works great and easy for joining finished maps. Like outputting whole mapsets from Mapsource and then just join the pieces you need for the day very quickly. So you don't need to mind about preloaded maps as long as you can get the image saved to your harddisk.

 

It's time saving if you wan't to change maps regulary.

Link to comment

Are the topo maps includeded with the 400t the same 1:100,000 maps that are used with the rest of the garmins? and if so, would this thing let you load NG 1:24,000 maps in it as the triton will?

 

I just got my army reserve reenlistment bonus and was about to get a delorme earthmate because of its 1:24,000 maps, but now I'm confused about what I should get.

 

The Garmin Colorado supports:

Garmin National Parks (1:24000).

Garmin US Topo 2008 maps with the 3-D elevation (1:100,000).

Does not support third party mapping programs.

 

If you want better detailed maps, Magellan Triton or Delorme PN-20. Plus, the mapping software will help you plan your trips better.

 

Colorado is inferior when it comes to maps and the compass. I can't see a reason to buy Colorado over the Triton or PN-20. Does anyone else have a reason?

 

Jake

Link to comment

...

Does not support third party mapping programs.

...

Jake

 

What? Pardon me, are you saying that it will NOT load any home made maps?

Thanks

I dont think that's true. apersson850 already tested a third party map from Above the Timber's and it worked. You can see pictures of it here.

 

Thanks for your reply. However that picture is misleading as it hotlinks directly from the "Above the timber" screenshots' page.

Link to comment

Thanks for your reply. However that picture is misleading as it hotlinks directly from the "Above the timber" screenshots' page.

No, I mean this pictures in the webalbum, which are screenshots taken from a Colorado 300. You have to read the hole post :)

 

Where have you got your information from ?

 

I don't see any HOME MADE topo maps there. And the Friluftskartan map is a Garmin licensee product.

 

Mike

Edited by alpamayo
Link to comment

Friluftskartan is, yes.

I don't know the vendor of that map from Colorado, but I don't think it's made by any company owned by Garmin. If they license any map making tool to them or not, I don't know?

Still, so far the Colorado has accepted any map I've thrown at it.

Could you test one of the maps from this Site ? These maps based on the openstreetmap project where homemade and run on a garmin GPSr. If possible with a screenshot in your webalbum.

Link to comment

Friluftskartan is, yes.

I don't know the vendor of that map from Colorado, but I don't think it's made by any company owned by Garmin. If they license any map making tool to them or not, I don't know?

Still, so far the Colorado has accepted any map I've thrown at it.

Could you test one of the maps from this Site ? These maps based on the openstreetmap project where homemade and run on a garmin GPSr. If possible with a screenshot in your webalbum.

 

I second Lujason's request :) Better if the map is transparent. Pretty please. :)

Link to comment

Please, can you explain it.

I thought a 300 with a 8 GB SD card is cheaper and has THE SAME FEATURES compared to a 400-model

I need special maps which are not included in the 400.

No, it's not the same. Assuming you do need the maps that are in the 400x model you buy, you then have a Colorado with these maps, and still have the SD card reader free for a card with other maps.

If you get a 300, you have to use some of the space on that card for the maps you got internally on the 400x. Even if there's still space on the card for more maps, it doesn't help, if you want some other maps, that are available on pre-programmed cards only. That kind of maps don't run from any other card than the one they were delivered on.

 

On a 400x, such a card easily co-exists with the pre-loaded maps. On a 300, you have to select a part of the maps you are missing from the 400, install them in internal memory, take your SD card out and put the pre-programmed card in the card slot.

 

Doable, but less convenient. So it's not the same, even if it still works.

 

So if you know you want the topo maps it may be best to buy the 400T vs. the 300 and mapsource 2008? I want to view the maps on my computer also so I will probably end up buy Mapsource 2008 anyway. The question is with the 400T you have the entire US loaded at once. But in the Memory big enough in the 300 to Load the entire us with the topo 2008 disk?

 

Or is it possible to buy a blank memory card and load us topo 2008 on that and insall it in the 300 and still load portions of the US with another mapsoure product in the 300s free memory?

 

I guess I want the topos but still not sure which colorado unit.

Link to comment

Sooo, which map do you want? Afghanistan?

 

For the Colorado 300 to take all of Topo US 2008, I'd imagine you need a 4 GB card for that. There's not enough space in the unit itself. But you can install a couple of states from City Navigator North America in the internal memory, at the same time, and use them as you need (wilderness vs. along the roads).

 

Or you get an 8 GB card (assuming the Colorado can handle that. I only know it can take 4 GB) and put all Topo and CNNA on the same card.

 

Or you get a 4 GB for topo and another 2 GB for CNNA. Changing cards is pretty easy on the Colorado. No need to remove the batteries.

Edited by apersson850
Link to comment

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
Followers 9
×
×
  • Create New...