Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 16
Couparangus

Canadian Geopub Quiz

Recommended Posts

1. What is the largest lake in the world?

2. What is the largest lake completely contained within a single city?

Ah, good questions! As a bonus, let's also see if anyone knows how the second lake was formed!

 

TOMTEC

Share this post


Link to post
1. What is the largest lake in the world?

2. What is the largest lake completely contained within a single city?

Ah, good questions! As a bonus, let's also see if anyone knows how the second lake was formed!

 

TOMTEC

 

1. Salt water it's the Caspian Sea, freshwater it's Lake Superior.

 

2. I had to check the spelling, but it's Lake Wanapitei, in Sudbury. It was formed (along with the metal deposits mined there) when a meteor crashed into the earth. I think there's a couple other lakes in the area that were formed the same way.

 

Greywynd

Share this post


Link to post
1. What is the largest lake in the world?

2. What is the largest lake completely contained within a single city?

Ah, good questions! As a bonus, let's also see if anyone knows how the second lake was formed!

 

TOMTEC

 

1. Salt water it's the Caspian Sea, freshwater it's Lake Superior.

 

2. I had to check the spelling, but it's Lake Wanapitei, in Sudbury. It was formed (along with the metal deposits mined there) when a meteor crashed into the earth. I think there's a couple other lakes in the area that were formed the same way.

 

Greywynd

 

Absolutely Greywynd. The Caspian Sea is called a sea but is surrounded by land so is considered to be a lake and good job on Wanapitei.

 

You're turn Greywynd.

 

JD

Share this post


Link to post

1. What is the largest lake in the world?

2. What is the largest lake completely contained within a single city?

 

Lake Superior

Lake Ramsay/Sudbury, ON?

Share this post


Link to post

1. What is the largest lake in the world?

2. What is the largest lake completely contained within a single city?

 

Lake Superior

Lake Ramsay/Sudbury, ON?

 

Uhm... Server Lagged? <_< never mind.. Go-Go Gadget GreyWnd!

Share this post


Link to post

Sorry about the delay, of course my answer was given the nod just after I left for work today.

 

Ok, local (well, to me) trivia, water related as well. Some of you have completed the virtual cache there as well, so hope you were paying attention.

 

In Peterborough, as part of the Trent-Severn Waterway, is located the Peterborough Hydraulic Liftlock.

 

Tell us three things....

 

1. The height of the lift at this lock.

 

2. The amount of concrete and reinforcing steel used to construct the lock.

 

3. The process used to test and install the cylinders. (If you find this on the net I'd be surprised!!!)

 

Greywynd

Share this post


Link to post

Sorry about the delay, of course my answer was given the nod just after I left for work today.

 

Ok, local (well, to me) trivia, water related as well. Some of you have completed the virtual cache there as well, so hope you were paying attention.

 

In Peterborough, as part of the Trent-Severn Waterway, is located the Peterborough Hydraulic Liftlock.

 

Tell us three things....

 

1. The height of the lift at this lock.

 

2. The amount of concrete and reinforcing steel used to construct the lock.

 

3. The process used to test and install the cylinders. (If you find this on the net I'd be surprised!!!)

 

Greywynd

 

We are not supposed to be using the net... These are suppposed to be questions that we know the answers to WITHOUT looking up the answers... I would be suprised if anyone is able to answer these honestly.

Share this post


Link to post

Sorry about the delay, of course my answer was given the nod just after I left for work today.

 

Ok, local (well, to me) trivia, water related as well. Some of you have completed the virtual cache there as well, so hope you were paying attention.

 

In Peterborough, as part of the Trent-Severn Waterway, is located the Peterborough Hydraulic Liftlock.

 

Tell us three things....

 

1. The height of the lift at this lock.

 

2. The amount of concrete and reinforcing steel used to construct the lock.

 

3. The process used to test and install the cylinders. (If you find this on the net I'd be surprised!!!)

 

Greywynd

 

Wow, I guess a lot of guessing will be going on...

 

1 - I will guess "20 feet"

2 - I will guess "2 tons"

3 - I will wildly guess "Cylinder test #22"

Share this post


Link to post

Sorry about the delay, of course my answer was given the nod just after I left for work today.

 

Ok, local (well, to me) trivia, water related as well. Some of you have completed the virtual cache there as well, so hope you were paying attention.

 

In Peterborough, as part of the Trent-Severn Waterway, is located the Peterborough Hydraulic Liftlock.

 

Tell us three things....

 

1. The height of the lift at this lock.

 

2. The amount of concrete and reinforcing steel used to construct the lock.

 

3. The process used to test and install the cylinders. (If you find this on the net I'd be surprised!!!)

 

Greywynd

 

We are not supposed to be using the net... These are suppposed to be questions that we know the answers to WITHOUT looking up the answers... I would be suprised if anyone is able to answer these honestly.

 

That's why I threw the third one in there.....keep folks honest. :lol:

 

Here I thought some of you cachers would have done this virtual, and knew some of the answers......alas.

 

Ok then....for the record.

 

1. 65', the highest hydraulic liftlock in the world.

 

2. over 26,000 yards of concrete were used.....NO reinforcing steel was used, making it quite possibly one of the largest non-reinforced concrete structures in the world.

 

3. The cylinder rams and bodies were made in sections (I think 5'long?), bolted together, and pressure tested with a clamping ring.

 

Ok, for a new question, describe how the hydraulic liftlocks work.

Share this post


Link to post

1. The height of the lift at this lock. 5.4m

 

2. The amount of concrete and reinforcing steel used to construct the lock. 10 TONS

 

3. The process used to test and install the cylinders

TRIAL & ERROR

Share this post


Link to post
Ok, for a new question, describe how the hydraulic liftlocks work.

 

Hydraulically?

 

Guess that's somewhat implied.....beyond that though, what allows the chambers to raise/lower, or how is it powered?

Share this post


Link to post
Ok, for a new question, describe how the hydraulic liftlocks work.

 

Hydraulically?

 

Guess that's somewhat implied.....beyond that though, what allows the chambers to raise/lower, or how is it powered?

 

Water?

Share this post


Link to post
Ok, for a new question, describe how the hydraulic liftlocks work.

 

Hydraulically?

 

Guess that's somewhat implied.....beyond that though, what allows the chambers to raise/lower, or how is it powered?

Gravity

Share this post


Link to post

Water is used as a fluid in the cylinders, and of course the chambers of the lock contain water.

 

Gravity plays a part, but how does the chamber raise?

 

Hint: Think about balance.

Share this post


Link to post

One is always up, the other is always down. They're balanced. It only takes a small amount of force to make them move. I think the answer is "hydraulic". Pump some oil into the one cylinder, they move.

Share this post


Link to post

One is always up, the other is always down. They're balanced. It only takes a small amount of force to make them move. I think the answer is "hydraulic". Pump some oil into the one cylinder, they move.

 

So I was right the first time? That never happens.

Share this post


Link to post

One is always up, the other is always down. They're balanced. It only takes a small amount of force to make them move. I think the answer is "hydraulic". Pump some oil into the one cylinder, they move.

 

So I was right the first time? That never happens.

 

I think so, but it's up to Greywynd. He might be thinking of something else...

Share this post


Link to post

I'm not going to answer this one because I used to work for the Trent Canal and was shown how the lift locks work and how to maintain them. When you find it out, its fascinatingly simple but very hard to observe. I'll tell you how when the question is actually answered.

 

JD

Share this post


Link to post

One is always up, the other is always down. They're balanced. It only takes a small amount of force to make them move. I think the answer is "hydraulic". Pump some oil into the one cylinder, they move.

 

Basically. Since the boats displace their own weight, that can be ignored. Let's say chamber 1 is down, 2 is up. To make a difference, chamber 2 is stopped a few inches shy of the top (seems to me about 8-10 inches), and the higher water volume in that chamber is what puts things out of balance. Down at the bottom of the cylinders there is a pipe/valve joining them, by opening it it will allow chamber 2 to drop, and chamber 1 to rise.

 

There is no pump involved, and when originally built (finished 1904) there was a turbine that powered a air compressor and generator, so that the services were completely self contained.

 

2happy, take it away.

 

Greywynd

Share this post


Link to post

One is always up, the other is always down. They're balanced. It only takes a small amount of force to make them move. I think the answer is "hydraulic". Pump some oil into the one cylinder, they move.

 

Basically. Since the boats displace their own weight, that can be ignored. Let's say chamber 1 is down, 2 is up. To make a difference, chamber 2 is stopped a few inches shy of the top (seems to me about 8-10 inches), and the higher water volume in that chamber is what puts things out of balance. Down at the bottom of the cylinders there is a pipe/valve joining them, by opening it it will allow chamber 2 to drop, and chamber 1 to rise.

 

There is no pump involved, and when originally built (finished 1904) there was a turbine that powered a air compressor and generator, so that the services were completely self contained.

 

2happy, take it away.

 

Greywynd

That's right Greywynd. The top chamber stops 1 foot below the level of canal or river at the top level. When the gate opens it allows the water rush in and increase the weight of that tub. It maintains that weight differential all the way to the bottom. The water that travels between cylinders is actually not from the tubs. Its actually forced out of the tp tub's cylinder by the weight of the top tub forcing the clyinder down. The water travels through piping, that's where the control valve comes in, and transfers to the lower tub's cylinder. The transfering water pressure forces the other up cylinder and tub up. So the two tubs are never really in balance. When it reaches the bottom, the bottom tubs' water is 1 foot above the canal level and empties the excess water into the canal and it become lighter again.

 

How to see this. There are three indicators of what is going on that are the most readily observable. First, if you get a good observation point. As the two tubs pass, if you are observant and looking for it, you can see the different height of water in the two tubs. Its expecially evident if you have two similar boats (one in each tub) and you'll see one sittinglower in its tub relative to the other. The other two are basically the same. When the lower gate opens watch the water rush out and at the top watch the water rush in.

 

JD

Share this post


Link to post

That's right Greywynd. The top chamber stops 1 foot below the level of canal or river at the top level. When the gate opens it allows the water rush in and increase the weight of that tub. It maintains that weight differential all the way to the bottom. The water that travels between cylinders is actually not from the tubs. Its actually forced out of the tp tub's cylinder by the weight of the top tub forcing the clyinder down. The water travels through piping, that's where the control valve comes in, and transfers to the lower tub's cylinder. The transfering water pressure forces the other up cylinder and tub up. So the two tubs are never really in balance. When it reaches the bottom, the bottom tubs' water is 1 foot above the canal level and empties the excess water into the canal and it become lighter again.

 

How to see this. There are three indicators of what is going on that are the most readily observable. First, if you get a good observation point. As the two tubs pass, if you are observant and looking for it, you can see the different height of water in the two tubs. Its expecially evident if you have two similar boats (one in each tub) and you'll see one sittinglower in its tub relative to the other. The other two are basically the same. When the lower gate opens watch the water rush out and at the top watch the water rush in.

 

JD

 

Dang...I was off a couple inches on the difference. I've seen it at both the top and the bottom, from both a spectator's view and a boater's view. One thing I will say, after growing up around boats, the first time you enter the upper chamber, pulling up to the gate, and see nothing but air out in front of you (no water!!!) is a really weird experience.... pulling up to the top of a 'cliff' in a boat is just wrong somehow.

 

I always have maintained that they messed up a little when they 'modernized' the lock in the 60's, I understand it is no longer self contained. I always figured I'd love a tour of the 'behind the scenes' areas, the mechanical room underneath and so on, just no idea how one would go about it....I know it's not a normal thing available to the public.

 

Greywynd

Edited by greywynd

Share this post


Link to post

I'm going easy on this one because I want it answered quickly so I can spend the weekend with my wife, whom I haven't seen in two weeks.

 

Canada has the oldest continuously operated canal in North America.

 

What is it, what two major centres does it link together and when did it open?

 

Easy peasy. Good luck.

Share this post


Link to post

The rideau canal, joins together Kingston and Ottawa.

 

Greywynd

 

Correct, now what year for all the marbles?

 

No peeking!!!

Share this post


Link to post

This Year (2007) is the 175th Anniversary of the opening of Rideau Canal, so simple math tells me it was opened in 1832

Share this post


Link to post

 

I always figured I'd love a tour of the 'behind the scenes' areas, the mechanical room underneath and so on, just no idea how one would go about it....I know it's not a normal thing available to the public.

 

Greywynd

Yep, off by two inches. :huh: Just giving the facts as I was told them

 

I've been in the valve room but its not that big a deal really. Just a bunch of actuators to control the opening of the valve. But, I don't think you can ever get in there any more than the mechanical room at the Big Chute (worked there too and also been in it) because of the safety hazards. To me at least, the intricacy of how the Big Chutes four reversing pulley's work is more interesting.

 

JD

Share this post


Link to post

The rideau canal, joins together Kingston and Ottawa.

 

Greywynd

 

Correct, now what year for all the marbles?

 

No peeking!!!

 

Ok, I didn't get all teh marbles, but since it's been quiet, I'll throw out a question.

 

What's considered the longest street in the world?

 

Greywynd

Share this post


Link to post

hmmm... here's an easy one.

Where is the southernmost cache in Canada?

(Extra bonus points if you know its name).

Share this post


Link to post

Ok, I didn't get all teh marbles, but since it's been quiet, I'll throw out a question.

 

What's considered the longest street in the world?

 

Greywynd

 

Yonge Street?

 

Yeah, but it isn't called Younge Street all the way to Vancouver, and it only starts in Toronto. What about the Trans-Canada Highway that starts in St. John's and goes all the way to Vancouver?

Share this post


Link to post

Guinness stopped recognizing it as such in 1998, but a lot of Canucks still lay claim to the title. If I recall it was also a Trivial Pursuit question, not like that makes it gospel either. (Also notice I said "considered"?) :)B)

 

Check out the following from Wikipedia:

 

Yonge Street was a part of Ontario Provincial Highway 11, which led to claims that Yonge Street was the longest street in the world. Running from the shores of Lake Ontario, through central and northern Ontario to the Ontario-Minnesota border at Rainy River, Highway 11 was over 1,896 kilometres long. But Yonge Street could only be called the longest street in the world if "Highway 11" and "Yonge Street" were synonymous, which was debatable. However, the Guinness Book of World Records recognized this claim as late as 1998.

 

Changes in provincial responsibility separated the now locally-funded and controlled Yonge Street from Highway 11 during the 1990s. As a result, Provincial Highway 11 does not start until after the city of Barrie (or Crown Hill), just north of where the name "Yonge Street" ends. The Guinness Book of World Records no longer lists Yonge as the longest street in the world, citing instead the Pan-American Highway as the world's longest "motorable road".

 

This has not stopped Torontonians from clinging to the claim. Although current tourist campaigns do not make much of it, its status as an urban myth is bolstered by an art installation at the foot of Yonge Street, and a map of its length laid out into the sidewalk in bronze at the southwest corner of Yonge and Dundas Streets.

 

Also, according to The Guinness Book of World Records, the Pan-American Highway is the world's longest "motorable road", though there are several areas that are questionable, and even a gap or two in rain forest areas.

 

Greywynd

Share this post


Link to post

Yes, it is the "Southernmost Stash" (a multi) - and it's in the southern part of Pelee Island. Its predecessor (a single cache also called Southernmost Stash) was my very first cache find!

Over to you, CA!

Share this post


Link to post

This Year (2007) is the 175th Anniversary of the opening of Rideau Canal, so simple math tells me it was opened in 1832

 

That date is correct. Greywynd took the next question though because I haven't been online all weekend. You guys can duke it out for the glory.

 

Cheers,

Share this post


Link to post

This Year (2007) is the 175th Anniversary of the opening of Rideau Canal, so simple math tells me it was opened in 1832

 

That date is correct. Greywynd took the next question though because I haven't been online all weekend. You guys can duke it out for the glory.

 

Cheers,

 

I don't duke anything out anymore.....starting to feel teh bruises a lot more than I used too!!

Share this post


Link to post

As the Ligitimate "Marble Taker" for Rideau Canal question let me ask a quickie........

What is an "Agonic line"

Share this post


Link to post

As the Ligitimate "Marble Taker" for Rideau Canal question let me ask a quickie........

What is an "Agonic line"

 

I don't know if I'm right, but I remember something like this from Infantry nav class. Let me try it out anyways. I believe it is the line that runs directly south of magnetic north; where the declination of your compass is neither positive nor negative.

Share this post


Link to post

 

I don't know if I'm right, but I remember something like this from Infantry nav class. Let me try it out anyways. I believe it is the line that runs directly south of magnetic north; where the declination of your compass is neither positive nor negative.

 

Well, You are on the right track 2H2G.

Agonic line is an imaginary line joining places with zero declination/variation.

 

So over to you for your effort 2H2G

Share this post


Link to post

Ok, another history question, I guess. I like history, that's ok isn't it?

 

The Martello tower is a popular historical and architectural attraction. It is believed that they are named after Cape Mortella in Corsica (had to look that up). There are 11 of approximately 200 still standing in Canada. How many of these were built in Kingston, Ontario, how many remain, why were most of them built?

 

This is a trick question and the answer may surprise you!!!!

Edited by 2happy2gether

Share this post


Link to post

Ok, another history question, I guess. I like history, that's ok isn't it?

 

The Martello tower is a popular historical and architectural attraction. It is believed that they are named after Cape Mortella in Corsica (had to look that up). There are 11 of approximately 200 still standing in Canada. How many of these were built in Kingston, Ontario, how many remain, why were most of them built?

 

This is a trick question and the answer may surprise you!!!!

 

Eleven?

 

(OK I thought that was the trick...that they were all in Kingston. After thinking about it some more, I went and looked it up, so I have to abstain from answering. :(:) )

 

Greywynd

Edited by greywynd

Share this post


Link to post

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 16

×
×
  • Create New...