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IPhone or GPS...


RGnVA
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I have recently been using my Android smartphone for geocaching along with my Etrex handheld, and the biggest differencees I've noted have been with the direction pointer and with GPS reception.  This is not an exhaustive comparison, just a comment on what I've seen thus far, and have found both to be handy to have while geocaching. 

 

I preface these comments with the disclaimer that I've done most of my over 10 years of geocaching with a succession of three Etrex units, and have been well-pleased with the performance of each, differing only in the "bells and whistles" categories.

 

First of all, the "distance to go" function of the smartphone has pretty much mirrored what I read on the handheld, give or take a few feet, and that by itself has made it somewhat reliable for phone-only caching.  However, I have noticed that the phone seems more likely to "freeze" at times, and might take a minute or two before re-locking. The handheld has seemed more reliable at maintaining lock, but that's just my perception.

 

More importantly, though, the phone direction pointer/compass has been mostly worthless to me, whereas the handheld pointer/compass has been quite reliable.  There have been many times when I've moved towards a cache with the phone distance decreasing and pretty much matching the handheld, but with the phone pointer/compass swinging wildly (sometimes behind me) while the handheld pointed straight and steady toward the area where I've eventually found the cache.

 

On the other hand, I get much better results when phone-only by disregarding the direction pointer/compass and instead rely on the app mapping function along with distance readout.  Said another way, even with the compass and pointer swinging wildly, the map (with distance) has been consistently steady in leading me to a cache.  Although I use an Android phone, I've discussed this with some who use Iphones and have been told that they use map/distance for the same reason.

 

While handheld is still my first personal choice for geocaching,  I also Iike having the phone with me for several reasons:

 

1)  I can use the phone to take a picture of my handheld in documenting an Earthcache or Virtual

 

2)  The phone screen is a whole lot bigger and readable than the handheld (at least, mine anyhow)

 

3)  I can use the phone to access the web while searching around a GZ

 

4)  I have an extra location device in case I get deep in the woods and the batteries on one of the devices play out.

 

5)  I can use the phone to, perhaps, call a friend or CO for assistance.

 

However, the handheld has had advantages of its own:

 

1)  A steady pointer that, at a glance, points me toward a GZ

 

2)  Seems much more tolerant of abuse (i.e., accidentally banging it into things, operating while in the rain, getting mud/dirt on it, etc.)

      I often wear my handheld on a lanyard around my neck, something I wouldn't do with a smartphone.

 

3)  Only requires a couple of AA batteries in my pocket for backup power.

 

Bottom line:  For me, the phone can definitely get the job done and has lots of advantages----but the handheld (so far) is still my primary go-to device.  Not saying it's better---just that's how I use them.  Others may have their own preferences.

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37 minutes ago, TommyGator said:

I have recently been using my Android smartphone for geocaching along with my Etrex handheld, and the biggest differencees I've noted have been with the direction pointer and with GPS reception.  This is not an exhaustive comparison, just a comment on what I've seen thus far, and have found both to be handy to have while geocaching. 

 

I preface these comments with the disclaimer that I've done most of my over 10 years of geocaching with a succession of three Etrex units, and have been well-pleased with the performance of each, differing only in the "bells and whistles" categories.

 

First of all, the "distance to go" function of the smartphone has pretty much mirrored what I read on the handheld, give or take a few feet, and that by itself has made it somewhat reliable for phone-only caching.  However, I have noticed that the phone seems more likely to "freeze" at times, and might take a minute or two before re-locking. The handheld has seemed more reliable at maintaining lock, but that's just my perception.

 

More importantly, though, the phone direction pointer/compass has been mostly worthless to me, whereas the handheld pointer/compass has been quite reliable.  There have been many times when I've moved towards a cache with the phone distance decreasing and pretty much matching the handheld, but with the phone pointer/compass swinging wildly (sometimes behind me) while the handheld pointed straight and steady toward the area where I've eventually found the cache.

 

On the other hand, I get much better results when phone-only by disregarding the direction pointer/compass and instead rely on the app mapping function along with distance readout.  Said another way, even with the compass and pointer swinging wildly, the map (with distance) has been consistently steady in leading me to a cache.  Although I use an Android phone, I've discussed this with some who use Iphones and have been told that they use map/distance for the same reason.

 

While handheld is still my first personal choice for geocaching,  I also Iike having the phone with me for several reasons:

 

1)  I can use the phone to take a picture of my handheld in documenting an Earthcache or Virtual

 

2)  The phone screen is a whole lot bigger and readable than the handheld (at least, mine anyhow)

 

3)  I can use the phone to access the web while searching around a GZ

 

4)  I have an extra location device in case I get deep in the woods and the batteries on one of the devices play out.

 

5)  I can use the phone to, perhaps, call a friend or CO for assistance.

 

However, the handheld has had advantages of its own:

 

1)  A steady pointer that, at a glance, points me toward a GZ

 

2)  Seems much more tolerant of abuse (i.e., accidentally banging it into things, operating while in the rain, getting mud/dirt on it, etc.)

      I often wear my handheld on a lanyard around my neck, something I wouldn't do with a smartphone.

 

3)  Only requires a couple of AA batteries in my pocket for backup power.

 

Bottom line:  For me, the phone can definitely get the job done and has lots of advantages----but the handheld (so far) is still my primary go-to device.  Not saying it's better---just that's how I use them.  Others may have their own preferences.


Cool report!  The main thing I use my iPhone for while caching is photos.  And they turn out great as snapshots (resized to 800x600).  I almost never bring my “real camera” on the hike, although I sometimes regret not having it.  But it’s less to carry.

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12 hours ago, TommyGator said:

On the other hand, I get much better results when phone-only by disregarding the direction pointer/compass and instead rely on the app mapping function along with distance readout.  Said another way, even with the compass and pointer swinging wildly, the map (with distance) has been consistently steady in leading me to a cache.  Although I use an Android phone, I've discussed this with some who use Iphones and have been told that they use map/distance for the same reason.

 

Informative post!

 

The compass is an interesting predicament...

First off, obviously the compass isn't related to GPS on any device, let alone smartphone, so it's not completely relevant to the question of GPS capability. And, its effectiveness can vary enormously between brands and models, and may be even more susceptible to hardware bugs and issues that GPS reception (but that's just a personal guess based on the fact that its effectiveness is entirely contained to your hand :))

 

Personally, if my compass is ever off I immediately do the figure 8 wave in the air to attempt to recalibrate. But I'm also one of those map-view geocachers; I've always hated the compass navigation method (but not because of the compass).  In map view Cachly still shows a little tick on your location pin indicating the direction you're facing, and I quite often use that, so the compass is still relevant, just not super important. Even google navigation (AFAIK) doesn't really use compass for direction, but your relative motion.

 

I've always kind of felt like magnetic compass on smartphones (ALL smartphones) was kind of a hack when they started including it, and never really rely on it for anything important.

So that's certainly something for prospective buyers to consider; some people will place more value on a highly accurate compass than others, and it's a factor that's related to one's preference and geocaching habits :)

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1 hour ago, thebruce0 said:

First off, obviously the compass isn't related to GPS on any device

I think this is not entirely true.

I mean certainly the compass in itself is not related to GPS but whenever people are taking about a "compass view" they certainly mean the arrow pointing towards the selected waypoint. And this is very much related to GPS and the closer you are to the WP the more eventually jumping GPS coordinates will result in an flickering or otherwise strange behaving arrow.

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If you hold a normal compass (mine is an old Boy Scout compass) flat the arrow points to Magnetic North. You then rotate the base to point towards your waypoint to set the bearing.  All works fine, but if you tilt the compass it will display corrupted information.  The same could be true for GPSr units, however...

 

On my GPSr I display the heading arrow and the actual bearing to the next waypoint.  The bearing is determined by the GPS signal, but the heading is determined by either motion (>1.5 mph) or, if no motion, magnetometers.  Just like my BSA compass, tilting the GPSr will corrupt the heading unless corrected.  Older GPSr used a bubble level to fix the compass’ orientation but now most GPSrs use accelerometers.

 

There are three accelerometers that are used to orient GPSrs by determining which way is down (center of the earth) by measuring the acceleration forces in 3-space (XYZ). Gravity is an acceleration force.  Magnetometers are constantly changing as the GPSr moves through local lines of magnetic flux.  Accelerometers are calibrated once (unless they become corrupted) so the GPSr knows how it is oriented.  If tilted the GPSr can mathematically reorient itself to find the center of the earth.

 

It should be noted, magnetic compasses don’t necessarily point to Magnetic North.  They align themselves to the local lines of force which generally point to Magnetic North.  These lines of force are subject to local disturbances that may bend them and throw off the compass needle.
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1 hour ago, thebruce0 said:

obviously the compass isn't related to GPS on any device

 

I have set my geocaching App to use only GPS data for the compass. Obviously, it works only when I move for a while and point the device forward. If I stop, the compass is useless. I prefer this setup because magnetic compass was too vague for me and I am used to triangulate the cache using distances.

 

 

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2 hours ago, Hynz said:
3 hours ago, thebruce0 said:

First off, obviously the compass isn't related to GPS on any device

I think this is not entirely true.

I mean certainly the compass in itself is not related to GPS but whenever people are taking about a "compass view" they certainly mean the arrow pointing towards the selected waypoint. And this is very much related to GPS and the closer you are to the WP the more eventually jumping GPS coordinates will result in an flickering or otherwise strange behaving arrow.

 

The bold is what I'm referring to. The [magnetic] compass is not connected to GPS in any way.

 

The arrow pointing to the waypoint isn't compass, that's just a depiction of relative location from you to the gps location. It's 100% ineffective if the compass is incorrect (well unless your device orientation happens to match the relative location).  There may be UI elements that the magnetic compass can have an effect on, clearly, but when the compass issue was raised, it's was related to the use of the magnetic pointer (at least I inferred it was its use as if the user was standing still).

Per my preference above, that is one of the reasons I don't like using the 'compass view' strategy - because I just find the technique itself to be less reliable than map view. Whether the compass is 4% off calibration, or 90% off, relying on a magnetic compass to arrive at a specific gps location (regardless of device) is simply much harder to do than inferring location and direction from an overhead view where the only technical uncertainty is really just how accurate your device is depicting your gps location, because you have surrounding landmarks to work with (even if the magnetic compass indication is not calibrated to 100% accuracy).

 

1 hour ago, arisoft said:

I have set my geocaching App to use only GPS data for the compass. Obviously, it works only when I move for a while and point the device forward. If I stop, the compass is useless. I prefer this setup because magnetic compass was too vague for me and I am used to triangulate the cache using distances.

 

This is what I mentioned Google does with navigation. It's not giving your heading (or the direction your device is pointing), it's telling you your vector of motion; which is why "if you point it forward" it works - because if you just moved, you're aligning your device to your direction of movement. That's not the magnetic compass.

 

That said, it is possible for any device to present your relative motion and label it as compass - and I think that can really confuse people, because whenever they stop and turn thinking the compass will react, they get confused because it doesn't turn until they move 'forward' again. Then they blame the hardware for having a bad compass :P without realizing what's actually happening.

Edited by thebruce0
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1 hour ago, thebruce0 said:

The arrow pointing to the waypoint isn't compass

 

Here is a misunderstanding. A compass is a device that shows the cardinal directions used for navigation and geographic orientation. It commonly consists of a magnetized needle or other element, such as a compass card or compass rose, which can pivot to align itself with magnetic north. Other methods may be used, including gyroscopes, magnetometers, and GPS receivers.

 

I think that the correct term should be relative bearing when we talk about the arrow pointing to the waypoint.

Edited by arisoft
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Maybe I'm odd :P but when navigating with a GPSr with an integrated mapview I rarely need a device just helping me to find north or any other bearing relative to north.

Only when the description says "it's in the SW-corner" then maybe I glance on the compass rose to be sure about the directions.

But whenever I'm close to the WP or Cache I usually switch to the "compass view" of my GPSr with magnetic compass and watch the arrow pointing to the WP *and* the distance but not the compass rose.

 

Isn't this what everybody else is doing whenever they are talking about using the "compass" of a GPSr?

Close to the WP the map view to me is only helpfull to see my bread crumb trail and to figure out areas I might have missed in my search. I'm talking about rural areas where no landfeatures are close and so usually are of no help.

 

But I agree that the magnetic compass is a tricky and easily confusing feature often needing some calibration. Also the fact that a GPSr can emulate a compass but only when in motion might confuse people. Back in the days this was much more transparent and known to the user of a GPSr than I guess to todays target audience.

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We use both.... GPSr to navigate to caches (Garmin Montana), and iPhone to take photos, view photos and older logs on caches, message friends, and even occasionally make a phone call.... and you need a phone for that occasion when caches are published while you're out....

What I prefer about the Garmin is its battery life, and the fact it just navigates. Look where your going, put it back in your pocket, pull it  out and look at screen and you're off again..... with the phone you have to unlock it, select the app, wait for it to settle - no thanks....

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5 hours ago, lee737 said:

Look where your going, put it back in your pocket, pull it  out and look at screen and you're off again..... with the phone you have to unlock it, select the app, wait for it to settle - no thanks....

 

Not the way I use my phone, it's super fast and convenient. It's just a matter of how you figure out how to use it. Just like I'd think the handheld is big, clunky, heavy, inconvenient... and you'd disagree ;)  I have a lanyard I can put my phone in if I like (perhaps while paddling); otherwise it's in my pocket - even the Max large size. A tap and swipe brings up the app I was just using, so when geocaching that's as convenient as it gets (or I can even leave it on, and lock the screen if I like). If I want to navigate then I'm using google maps; so it's either two devices - one for geocaching and one for navigating, or one device and two apps - one for geocaching and one for navigating. 

 

I guess what I'm saying is, quite often complaints that I hear are blamed on "smartphones" rather than just a personal preference. Like "battery life is awful" of smartphones to me translates as "I don't use my smartphone in a way that's optimal as a smartphone" (since there are others who don't share the same criticisms of battery life, or durability, etc), so it's not so much a problem with smartphones as it is just the way it's being used. (and I'm sure the same might go with reasons I don't like using a handheld)

Which is fine, of course, but it's the difference between an objective criticism of the tool itself, versus clarity that it's an anecdotal preference (the latter, imo, being more helpful for informed decision making).

 

 

7 hours ago, Hynz said:

whenever I'm close to the WP or Cache I usually switch to the "compass view" of my GPSr with magnetic compass and watch the arrow pointing to the WP *and* the distance but not the compass rose.

 

The compass rose - if you're referring to visual indication of which way NSEW are - isn't an indication that the magnetic compass is in use. Magnetic compass just allows the device to know its orientation relative to magnetic North. That relative orientation is essential to tell you which direction to go (where the arrow should point) regardless of the direction you're looking, to get to the waypoint.   You don't even have to see an "N" for that, the cardinal directions are purely visual. Under the hood, the magnetic compass has to know which way N is; or rather, that's exactly what the magnetic compass is.

So if you're using the compass view to navigate to a waypoint (properly, as in whether you're moving or not), you are using the magnetic compass functionality, even if the compass rose isn't displayed. That ability exists on most any device with GPS, if it has a built in magnetometer to use (which isn't the same as gps capability).

Edited by thebruce0
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6 hours ago, lee737 said:

What I prefer about the Garmin is its battery life, and the fact it just navigates. Look where your going, put it back in your pocket, pull it  out and look at screen and you're off again.

 

That's what I like about the Etrex line.  People keep it in a pocket.  My Garmin Oregon (any version) is a leetle too big for a pants pocket.  I actually have to make a special accommodation for the GPSr, which tends to be having it safe inside its clamshell case (so it can't get dents or scratches) and wearing my cache pack which has a hook to hang the GPSr open, hands free.

 

The iPhone stays "off" (default locked) to conserve battery life, and it's safely holstered until I need it.  But the screen is almost invisible in sunlight, so I don't consider it as a directional device unless I forgot my GPSr.. . or more likely, decided "The cache is so close, I don't even need the GPSr".  Wrong!  Just like, "it's 20 feet from the road, I'm sure I don't need to bring my DEET over there."  Wrong!  :anicute:

 

 

Edited by kunarion
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9 minutes ago, kunarion said:

"The cache is so close, I don't even need the GPSr".  Wrong!  Just like, "it's 20 feet from the road, I'm sure I don't need to bring my DEET over there."  Wrong!  :anicute:

 

Oh man, there's two sides to that coin. :lol:  Sometimes, you're so close it's just pointless to use the gps - but it's funny in a group when people staring at their screens trying narrow gz, when someone is standing on top of the cache. :) On the other hand, I can't count how many times I've said "Oh it's right there!" with the geosense, then wish I'd taken the gps so it could tell me my geosense was way wrong! lol

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45 minutes ago, thebruce0 said:

 

Oh man, there's two sides to that coin. :lol:  Sometimes, you're so close it's just pointless to use the gps - but it's funny in a group when people staring at their screens trying narrow gz, when someone is standing on top of the cache. :) On the other hand, I can't count how many times I've said "Oh it's right there!" with the geosense, then wish I'd taken the gps so it could tell me my geosense was way wrong! lol

 

A cache friend once exclaimed "you're standing on it!" when lid of a big ammo box was perfectly level with the ground.  I was still trying to get the pointer to settle.  He "heard a metallic clunk" as I stepped on it. :rolleyes:

 

Yeah, and when I'm right where I expected to find it and there's a cache-shaped dent in the leaves and everything, and I begin to believe it couldn't be anywhere else... "Please, GyPSy, point me away from here or I'll never find it!" :unsure:

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30 minutes ago, kunarion said:

A cache friend once exclaimed "you're standing on it!" when lid of a big ammo box was perfectly level with the ground.  I was still trying to get the pointer to settle.  He "heard a metallic clunk" as I stepped on it. :rolleyes:

I have been known to trip over a regular size cache that everyone else in the group had spotted. It was just sitting on the ground in the open. Everyone else had spotted it, and they were giving "hotter" and "colder" clues. I was the last one to spot the cache, so I opened it, and when everyone else was done signing/trading, I replaced it as found.

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1 hour ago, niraD said:

I have been known to trip over a regular size cache that everyone else in the group had spotted. It was just sitting on the ground in the open. Everyone else had spotted it, and they were giving "hotter" and "colder" clues. I was the last one to spot the cache, so I opened it, and when everyone else was done signing/trading, I replaced it as found.

 

When I'm with a cache group, it's embarrassingly obvious that I'm The World's Worst Geocacher.  They all found it and I'm the last, so they laugh and have fun "letting me try to find it", and they sit back and enjoy me helplessly wandering around.  And as my hunt wears on, expressions change.  Smiles fade.  They begin to express great sympathy for my inability.  They ask if I should maybe consider a different hobby.  Then frustration.  Then anger.  Then they hand me the box in disgust and they all go wait in the car.  :unsure:

 

Edited by kunarion
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3 hours ago, kunarion said:

 

That's what I like about the Etrex line.  People keep it in a pocket.  My Garmin Oregon (any version) is a leetle too big for a pants pocket.  I actually have to make a special accommodation for the GPSr, which tends to be having it safe inside its clamshell case (so it can't get dents or scratches) and wearing my cache pack which has a hook to hang the GPSr open, hands free.

 

The iPhone stays "off" (default locked) to conserve battery life, and it's safely holstered until I need it.  But the screen is almost invisible in sunlight, so I don't consider it as a directional device unless I forgot my GPSr.. . or more likely, decided "The cache is so close, I don't even need the GPSr".  Wrong!  Just like, "it's 20 feet from the road, I'm sure I don't need to bring my DEET over there."  Wrong!  :anicute:

 

 

You should try a Montana! :D I had an Oregon initially, but the power button died, so I got my wife to get me a Montana for my birthday a couple of years ago.... mainly for the bigger screen - that's it advantage - it's nice and big, you know what its disadvantage is - it's nice and big! If it dies/goes MIA I'll probably go back to an Oregon or similar....

My phone is 90% camera, 5% messenger, 4% data retriever and 1% phone when we cache...... :)

 

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Just now, lee737 said:

You should try a Montana! :D I had an Oregon initially, but the power button died, so I got my wife to get me a Montana for my birthday a couple of years ago.... mainly for the bigger screen - that's it advantage - it's nice and big, you know what its disadvantage is - it's nice and big! If it dies/goes MIA I'll probably go back to an Oregon or similar....

My phone is 90% camera, 5% messenger, 4% data retriever and 1% phone when we cache...... :)

 

 

My brother has a Monterra (similar fit and form) in his Jeep.  That's one honkin huge GPSr!  But it also speaks the street routing cues, and it has a sweet car mount.  I thought of buying a Montana just as a car nav.  But except for its adeptness at Geocaching, I couldn't justify keeping on in a car (especially here in Hotlanta).

 

Have you seen cachers with an Etrex?  They keep it in a pocket with plenty of room for change and car keys.  It points to a cache, it's great.  And here I am with a Garmin Oregon, having to take care not to crush a body part while it's swinging around.

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1 minute ago, kunarion said:

 

My brother has a Monterra (similar fit and form) in his Jeep.  That's one honkin huge GPSr!  But it also speaks the street routing cues, and it has a sweet car mount.  I thought of buying a Montana just as a car nav.  But except for its adeptness at Geocaching, I couldn't justify keeping on in a car (especially here in Hotlanta).

 

Have you seen cachers with an Etrex?  They keep it in a pocket with plenty of room for change and car keys.  It points to a cache, it's great.  And here I am with a Garmin Oregon, having to take care not to crush a body part while it's swinging around.

I have trouble typing in WPs with the Oregon, the screen size and my fat fingers (even the kids pointy fingers) mean you mistype every second character.... the Montana is a dream to type on, not as good as a smartphone though, probably the more resilient screen has something to do with pressure needed? 

I also have extra PQs in my Montana for our local geocaching site, so can find caches from either quite easily... 

 

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3 hours ago, kunarion said:

That's what I like about the Etrex line.  People keep it in a pocket.  My Garmin Oregon (any version) is a leetle too big for a pants pocket.  I actually have to make a special accommodation for the GPSr, which tends to be having it safe inside its clamshell case (so it can't get dents or scratches) and wearing my cache pack which has a hook to hang the GPSr open, hands free.

 

I'm almost always wearing board shorts when caching and those aren't endowed with much in the way of pockets, so I generally carry my GPSr (an Oregon 700) and have a holster clip for my phone. The backpack has all the other essential stuff like water bottle, insect repellent, pens, spare batteries, printed maps, first aid kit, personal locator beacon, snake bite bandage, etc.

 

CachingAttire.jpg.790827e85a52e0955a709c0b4e09af9b.jpg

 

For me, the Oregon is lightweight, always displaying, readable in direct sunlight, rugged and has long battery life. By comparison, the phone and app just feel clunky and cumbersome to use, especially when it keeps going to sleep and has to be woken up and unlocked with its password each time I want to look at it.

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16 minutes ago, lee737 said:

I also have extra PQs in my Montana for our local geocaching site, so can find caches from either quite easily... 

 

Yeah, I definitely avoid filling my Nuvi with cache files.  That's what I use my iPhone most for, when Geocaching... street routing.  I managed to make Waze the default map App.  The phone goes crazy on a hike, the distance and bearing is all over the place.  But it can stick to streets just fine.  AND The App has those nice individual "Lists" to easily group and highlight caches in a busy area.  All I need to do is not be poking around in multiple Apps while I'm driving and I'm golden.

 

Edited by kunarion
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15 minutes ago, barefootjeff said:

By comparison, the phone and app just feel clunky and cumbersome to use, especially when it keeps going to sleep and has to be woken up and unlocked with its password each time I want to look at it.

 

Your phone lets you in?  Mine is pretty sure I'm a thief.  "That doesn't look like my owner's fingerprint to me.  Nope.  Nope.  Still Nope.  OK, and now that's not the pass code.  Nope.  Nope..."

 

Edited by kunarion
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18 minutes ago, kunarion said:

 

Your phone lets you in?  Mine is pretty sure I'm a thief.  "That doesn't look like my owner's fingerprint to me.  Nope.  Nope.  Still Nope.  OK, and now that's not the pass code.  Nope.  Nope..."

 

 

A few phones back I had one with the fingerprint scanner. It only sort of worked until I scraped my finger on a rock and then it wouldn't let me in. I gave up and went back to using an easy-to-remember password.

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7 minutes ago, barefootjeff said:

 

A few phones back I had one with the fingerprint scanner. It only sort of worked until I scraped my finger on a rock and then it wouldn't let me in. I gave up and went back to using an easy-to-remember password.

Mine now has face recognition, which is good until you wear sunglasses and hat, or a face mask.....

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3 hours ago, barefootjeff said:

 

A few phones back I had one with the fingerprint scanner. It only sort of worked until I scraped my finger on a rock and then it wouldn't let me in. I gave up and went back to using an easy-to-remember password.

 

I have several fingerprint scans on both hands so if a finger is cut off, at least I can still unlock the phone. 🙂

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6 hours ago, barefootjeff said:

the phone and app just feel clunky and cumbersome to use, especially when it keeps going to sleep and has to be woken up and unlocked with its password each time I want to look at it.

 

This is one reason I've never used a lock or recognition on my phone. I don't like all the extra work just to open it up especially if I'm sleeping it every few minutes. And not just with geocaching. Maybe if it had a timer so it wouldn't properly "lock" unless it was asleep for maybe 5-10 minutes. Then quick 'wake ups' wouldn't keep asking for security input.

Nope, mine's just vanilla. With the 12 it's tap/swipe and back at the last app used. 

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