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Chipper3

Researching for Conflicting Existing Caches

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This new thread is an extension of my earlier question on Red Dots page and why red dots do not show up sometimes when researching for a new cache site.  I got good answers in that thread but that led to more questions.  =)

 

OK, so I submitted a new cache (after a lot of preliminary work)  and the request was rejected as it conflicted with an existing cache.  Just the thing I feared in my original post.    The reviewer suggested that before hiding a new cache that  I - 1.) Check the Red Circle Map and 2.) Check for other caches near my proposed coordinates and research if they were multi-cache which would indicate that there might be a conflict.  and 3.) Use the  advanced search tool to uncover caches.  I also checked out the link provided in  a post in my other thread  -- https://www.geocaching.com/help/index.php?pg=kb.chapter&id=22&pgid=199

 

I seems that the only person/source that has info on all the hidden locations in wide ranging multi-caches is the reviewer.  And the attached advice from the above link just basically says to check with a reviewer before doing any work and submit a "dummy" request flagged with "Do Not Publish" just checking for conflicts.  

 

I am interested in forum member thoughts on just submitting "dummy" requests as a means to not doing a bunch of work on a cache only to find that the site is not available.

 

From the Geo Cache Help Page:

If you’re still unsure if your location is available, ask a local reviewer to confirm.

Tip: It’s a good idea to do this before you place your geocache.

    1.    Create a cache page with a title like "Coordinate Check".

    2.    Add locations as waypoints if you'd like the reviewer to check more than one location. This is similar to adding stages for a Multi-Cache.

    3.    Add a Reviewer Note to make sure that the reviewer does not publish the cache page. For example, “Do not publish, this is a coordinate check."

    4.    Submit your cache page for review and wait for your reviewer to reply.

Many thanks to Volunteer Geocache Reviewer palmetto for initially developing this article.
 

 


 

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We never asked a Reviewer if we were okay with our spot.

We've never seen a multi not inside a park, game lands, etc. from the first set of coordinates.

We went by boundaries in the map, and did the caches within it.  All multis had their stages kept.  This helped us for later hides too. :)

To me, "If you're still unsure..."  says "if you've exhausted all other means to find out if you're okay, ask a local Reviewer".

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If I'm not sure, I'll ask the reviewer, either by an email/message.  I usually don't submit a dummy cache page for a coordinate check.  However, I know my reviewer and I'm rarely in a rush to publish a cache.  If we got a new reviewer added to our area I'd probably be more comfortable doing the dummy cache page as I'd not know them well enough to send an email or a message via some other platform.

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29 minutes ago, Chipper3 said:

I seems that the only person/source that has info on all the hidden locations in wide ranging multi-caches is the reviewer.  And the attached advice from the above link just basically says to check with a reviewer before doing any work and submit a "dummy" request flagged with "Do Not Publish" just checking for conflicts.  

 

I am interested in forum member thoughts on just submitting "dummy" requests as a means to not doing a bunch of work on a cache only to find that the site is not available.

 

From the Geo Cache Help Page:

If you’re still unsure if your location is available, ask a local reviewer to confirm.

Tip: It’s a good idea to do this before you place your geocache.

    1.    Create a cache page with a title like "Coordinate Check".

    2.    Add locations as waypoints if you'd like the reviewer to check more than one location. This is similar to adding stages for a Multi-Cache.

    3.    Add a Reviewer Note to make sure that the reviewer does not publish the cache page. For example, “Do not publish, this is a coordinate check."

    4.    Submit your cache page for review and wait for your reviewer to reply.

Many thanks to Volunteer Geocache Reviewer palmetto for initially developing this article.

 

 

You would at most perform one saturation check for one intended cache location.  Other local cachers, not just the reviewer, "have info on all the hidden locations".  If the place is saturated with caches, people have figured out where to place caches.  Use the message system, or attend an Event and ask.  Sometimes that cool vacant spot is available because nobody can keep a cache there.

 

It's better to find the other caches, because in a saturated place, you need to physically investigate your intended hiding spot, and check distances, to avoid additional issues.  Or even better, discover a place where there aren't already a lot of caches. :)

 

Are you in SC?  That's not too far out of my range of day trip places to explore.  Go hide some real cool ones!  :P

 

 

Edited by kunarion
I got stuck under my bed.
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23 minutes ago, Chipper3 said:

I am interested in forum member thoughts on just submitting "dummy" requests as a means to not doing a bunch of work on a cache only to find that the site is not available.

 

I have the habit to look at every geocacher equally, no matter if he's a newbie or a veteran... but in this given situation, I would say that (almost) all your concerns will end when you are able to grow your experience finding caches of many types... especially in the territory where you also which to hide some. ;)

Edited by RuideAlmeida
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9 minutes ago, kunarion said:

It's better to find the other caches, because in a saturated place, you need to physically investigate your intended hiding spot, and check distances, to avoid additional issues. 

Or even better, discover a place where there aren't already a lot of caches. :)

 

Yep, add that a Reviewer probably won't answer 20 "cache checks" for a park (that battleship thing...), and will more likely advise to look at a couple anyway. :)

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2 minutes ago, cerberus1 said:

will more likely advise to look at a couple anyway. :)

 

Yeah.  I once asked people at an Event about a way cool empty area, and the reply was like "That's a cool place and on an unrelated topic have you found 'Colt Seavers'"?  OK, that was one of the potentially conflicting caches I had to find first.  Knowing your cache conflicts doesn't necessarily tell you where it may fit.

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38 minutes ago, Chipper3 said:

I am interested in forum member thoughts on just submitting "dummy" requests as a means to not doing a bunch of work on a cache only to find that the site is not available.

 

Another way is that you find all caches from the surrounding area. I think that is is easier to post a "dummy" request. Don't forget that you can post the same "dummy" cache as many time as you want. No need to start over every time.

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1 hour ago, Chipper3 said:

OK, so I submitted a new cache (after a lot of preliminary work)  and the request was rejected as it conflicted with an existing cache.  Just the thing I feared in my original post.   

 

Oh no! I'm so sorry to hear this. And it's exactly what you wanted to avoid. I'm glad you wrote about this though...if I ever decide to do a puzzle cache, this is good to know. Good luck!

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@HunterandSamuel -   Thank you for the nice and encouraging reply.  I'll post what I find from the reviewer as I basically asked the same question to the reviewer.  

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5 hours ago, Chipper3 said:

I am interested in forum member thoughts on just submitting "dummy" requests as a means to not doing a bunch of work on a cache only to find that the site is not available.


I always submit a coordinates check.  Having solved most of the puzzles and found most of the multis in my ‘manor’, I’d be surprised if I fell foul of proximity issues for published caches, but it could happen.
 

The important thing about the check is that it also reserves that spot for you - or conversely, lets you know if the spot you want has already been reserved by another cacher.

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7 hours ago, Chipper3 said:

OK, so I submitted a new cache (after a lot of preliminary work)  and the request was rejected as it conflicted with an existing cache.

I am interested in forum member thoughts on just submitting "dummy" requests as a means to not doing a bunch of work on a cache only to find that the site is not available.

 

If the coordinate map checker shows your area is clear, the next step I take is to look for multis and puzzles within a 2 mile radius of my chosen spot, and then either do them, and find the final, or at least solve the puzzle so I know where the final is located.  Only then, if the area seems clear, do I submit a "coordinate check" to my reviewer.

 

One of my first caches was placed, write up done, we had a great spot, and it came back that it conflicted with a nearby puzzle!  Grrrr - we were relatively new to geocaching, and hadn't done many puzzles yet.  Well, this got us started, it was a fun and interesting puzzle, and yes, the location was right across the road from where I wanted to place MY cache.  We ended up finding another cool spot, and that got published without more issues, and it 's still there today!

 

Hubby's first cache had the same thing happen; in that situation, we just needed the CO to move his about 50 ft, and it was along a rock wall so that would have been easy enough for us to do.  We would find it (a nice ammo can even!) and move it for him, and give him the new coordinates.  Instead, he said to find it, log it, save the container for him, and he would archive it and free up the location we wanted for our new placement.  

 

So find all the multis, puzzles, and maybe any WhereIGos if there are any near you before scoping out a location, and try not to get too attached to a particular spot; be flexible!

 

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A couple of mine have had very specific camouflage designed for a specific location. I asked the volunteer reviewers to verify that the location was available before investing time and money into building the camouflage. I also asked them to publish the caches on specific theme-related dates. They were happy to work with me, both to verify the availability of the location, and to publish them on the requested dates.

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2 hours ago, CAVinoGal said:

the next step I take is to look for multis and puzzles within a 2 mile radius of my chosen spot

 

The 2 mile limit only applies to mysteries, not multis. I have a multi where the final is about 7km from the listed coordinates:

 

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The listed coordinates and next two waypoints are virtuals at railway stations, with the final up in the forest near the last waypoint.

 

Generally when I'm placing a cache, it's either in an area where there are no other nearby caches or I've found them all. Recently, though, when planning a new one I saw there were a couple of D5 mysteries within 3km of my proposed GZ and they were puzzles I didn't have much chance of solving in a hurry, so I told a caching friend who'd found them both roughly where my new cache was going to go and asked whether the finals of those two puzzles were anywhere close. He said no, so I went ahead and it was published without any problems.

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I had a Mystery all set to go and it got knocked back due to another Mystery GZ being in the way. When I placed it there was nothing within cooee but a few of my own Trads. Turns out the "offending" Mystery was about 2km away. Being a D5 it was one I had no hope of solving. As for the spot I had chosen, I had a sentimental reason as it was a scenic lookout where my late wife and I would go "courting" fifty years ago. I let it go.

BTW it had a finder (checking out a nearby trig) before it was reviewed and, most likely, may not have known it was a Mystery.

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