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KenInCa

Addition to App

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New to the forum and tried endlessly searching through "search" and getting side tracked (as always... adhd) and finally gave up. I read many issues of finding the best place to put a cache, spending time and money to place it only to find that another is in close proximity due to a multi or my case a premium member.

 

Here's my solution to those that suggest or make upgrades to the apps. A section that will automatically check to see if there is a cache within the 0.1 miles to where you are thinking and give you a green check or a red x. I have had 3 caches that were rejected, 2 were premium caches that I didn't see in my map and another was a disabled cache. errrgggg! Frustrating!

 

I think I'm just venting and know that this is a dead horse that I'm hitting, so forgive my newbieness!

 

Ken

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We had a puzzle/mystery series once on a rails-to-trails.

Caches were spaced .4-.7 away from each other.

A cacher placed a mini powertrail through the whole thing so accurate, that just by looking at blank spaces on the map, you could tell where all our hides were w/o solving any. We archived them.

 

- Wouldn't a set-up that could, "automatically check to see if there is a cache within the 0.1 miles to where you are thinking" be similar?

No need to solve a tough puzzle, just keep moving a bit, check...move a bit, check... triangulate and got it.

 

Did you ask your Reviewer for help?

Under Checking for Geocache Saturation in the Help Center is a section that reads...

 

What can you do about those geocaches which you can't "see" online?

 

If you are still concerned about encountering the hidden parts of other geocaches, contact a reviewer with your geocache coordinates for a saturation check. This should be done before placing the geocache container.

 

1.Create a geocache listing, with a title like "Coordinate Check". You can add additional waypoints if you'd like more than one spot checked (use stage of a multi-cache waypoint type).

2.Add a Reviewer Note explaining that the geocache is not in place and you would like a saturation check.

3.Either enable the geocache, or email your local reviewer with the GC Code of the geocache. To find your local reviewer, check for a recent Published log on a nearby geocache. Follow the link of the reviewer's name to their profile, where you can email them through the site.

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Your idea would allow someone to "Battleship" the finals for mystery and multi caches without having to solve the mystery or do the stages of a multi. For that reason it will never occur.

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I understand the issue of those that would try to take advantage of the "battleship" technique to find a member's cache. I was just thinking that the reviewers have so much on their plates already that I would think that they are overwhelmed with the tons of cache reviews. Of course it doesn't help it anyways that I'm trying to place a cache in a saturated area anyways. I guess that I'm being too impatient with placement and really need to take the time to slow down and do it right. Like I stated above, I didn't want to bother the reviewers.

 

Thanks for the replies,

Ken

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Nope. There's other reasons being able to place a cache using the app is not a good idea, but just for your case; Like it was mentioned one could find unknown cache very easy. There are a couple solutions. First-I don't know about the app, but on the website it still shows disabled caches on the map. That shouldn't be a problem to anyone.

 

You could always get a premium membership(There are other benefits to one as well) so you'd know where those PMO caches are.

 

OR you could do what I do. Send in a co-ord check. Write up a minimal cache page with the co-ords and ask the reviewer to check for saturation. All the reviewer will do is look at the co-ords, it's easier on them then reviewing a full cache page only to tell you that you're 60 feet from the final to a multi cache. Saves you some work as well.

 

I also don't see how you're spending money. Sure the container costs money, but do you throw it away if it gets denied? Probably not. Do you leave it there and not retrieve it if it gets denied? That's your own fault, and that's littering. Nothing stops you from using the container at a new location. You can even re-use the cache page.

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I didn't want to bother the reviewers.

If you're getting serious about Geocaching, buy a Premium Membership (or travel with a PM cacher), go find those caches, and then you can map out some hide options. It's super handy to know exactly where all the "invisible" caches are, when scouting a new placement. You get more flexibility in the hide, so a problem (like poison ivy in that tree, not this other nearby tree) is easily corrected while hiding the container. You also could tell if your cool new hide idea is exactly the same as the next cache over (which may be good or bad, but maybe you'd want to know).

 

One other thing is, ask the land owner. I hid most of my caches in County Parks, and the manager (a Geocacher) keeps a map of all the caches. So when I mention a cool new placement, he reminds me that there's a cache too close to that :anicute:. Get to know local cachers (go to Events), and they can not only give you ideas about spots that are open, they can suggest reasons why those spots are open (some places have proven not so good for caches).

Edited by kunarion

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Your idea would allow someone to "Battleship" the finals for mystery and multi caches without having to solve the mystery or do the stages of a multi.
When the idea of an online saturation check has come up, I've offered a suggestion that I think will minimize the ability to "battleship" hidden final locations, while still allowing automatic confirmation that a location is available. The basic idea is for the system to remember guesses for a week/fortnight/month/whatever, and for new guesses to conflict both with existing cache locations and with any remembered guesses. So someone trying to "battleship" couldn't guess, adjust the coordinates slightly, and guess again, because the second guess would conflict with the first, no matter what cache locations might be nearby. And of course, the system would report only that there was a conflict, not the cache location (or remembered guess) that was in conflict.

 

There's other reasons being able to place a cache using the app is not a good idea,
+1

 

It is possible to get good coordinates with a smartphone, but it isn't a simple matter of turning on the phone and pushing a button. I'd rather not see the smartphone apps include features specifically designed to make listing new hides easier. But the basic idea of an automated saturation check is applicable to more than just the smartphone apps.

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You are building a Rube Goldberg system to try and handle a problem that is not that bad. It comes up in the forums occassionally but not enough to warrant the use of resources that ccould be put to better use.

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Like I stated above, I didn't want to bother the reviewers.

The person who hides their cache first and submits it for review gets my "please go back and move your cache" template, explaining the cache saturation guideline. I then need to follow up with that cache page until the problem is resolved or the cache is archived.

 

The person who sets up a "coordinate check" cache page for the same spot writes me a friendly note saying "I was thinking of placing a cache around here but there are lots of puzzles in the area I can't solve. Can you let me know if it's worth my time to hike out there and hide something?" I answer: "There are two conflicting puzzle solutions to the north and northwest. If you move southeast past the picnic shelter into the woods, you'll be clear of both of them."

 

Which interaction do you think "bothers" me more, and which makes me happier?

 

In ten years on the job, I've never had a person get angry with me after I deliver bad news in response to a coordinate check. ("Wow, thanks for letting me know, I'm glad I didn't waste time hiking all the way out there.") People who learn about a cache saturation guideline problem after hiding their cache container get mad at me on a monthly basis. ("You are being very inflexible. Your house is where fun goes to die.")

Edited by Keystone

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I have had 3 caches that were rejected, 2 were premium caches that I didn't see in my map and another was a disabled cache. errrgggg! Frustrating!

Did you know that, if you used the website cache search functionality instead of the smartphone app, all three of those caches would have shown up on the search results page, complete with directions and distances? The apps are designed for finding caches, not for hiding them. You can call the website up on your smartphone to run a check on a set of coordinates that way.

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I have had 3 caches that were rejected, 2 were premium caches that I didn't see in my map and another was a disabled cache. errrgggg! Frustrating!

Did you know that, if you used the website cache search functionality instead of the smartphone app, all three of those caches would have shown up on the search results page, complete with directions and distances? The apps are designed for finding caches, not for hiding them. You can call the website up on your smartphone to run a check on a set of coordinates that way.

 

Do premium caches show up on a basic members map on the website?

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Like I stated above, I didn't want to bother the reviewers.

The person who hides their cache first and submits it for review gets my "please go back and move your cache" template, explaining the cache saturation guideline. I then need to follow up with that cache page until the problem is resolved or the cache is archived.

 

The person who sets up a "coordinate check" cache page for the same spot writes me a friendly note saying "I was thinking of placing a cache around here but there are lots of puzzles in the area I can't solve. Can you let me know if it's worth my time to hike out there and hide something?" I answer: "There are two conflicting puzzle solutions to the north and northwest. If you move southeast past the picnic shelter into the woods, you'll be clear of both of them."

 

Which interaction do you think "bothers" me more, and which makes me happier?

 

In ten years on the job, I've never had a person get angry with me after I deliver bad news in response to a coordinate check. ("Wow, thanks for letting me know, I'm glad I didn't waste time hiking all the way out there.") People who learn about a cache saturation guideline problem after hiding their cache container get mad at me on a monthly basis. ("You are being very inflexible. Your house is where fun goes to die.")

 

Ok, case and point made.

 

Will use the website as a primary check, then saturation check as a final stage.

 

I was going about it in the wrong order. My goal is to make cache hides that are not just stuck in a hole, or under a lamp post skirt (don't get me wrong, I don't mind looking for those, especially after not being able to find a cache). So with all the other crazy things that are happening in my life, I use this as a short breakaway & outlet and unfortunately the frustration leeched in... sorry.

 

Thank you for letting me know of other options and hopefully I can find other places to put "creative" caches, and maybe a few evil ones.... bhawwahahaha.

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Like I stated above, I didn't want to bother the reviewers.

The person who hides their cache first and submits it for review gets my "please go back and move your cache" template, explaining the cache saturation guideline. I then need to follow up with that cache page until the problem is resolved or the cache is archived.

 

The person who sets up a "coordinate check" cache page for the same spot writes me a friendly note saying "I was thinking of placing a cache around here but there are lots of puzzles in the area I can't solve. Can you let me know if it's worth my time to hike out there and hide something?" I answer: "There are two conflicting puzzle solutions to the north and northwest. If you move southeast past the picnic shelter into the woods, you'll be clear of both of them."

 

Which interaction do you think "bothers" me more, and which makes me happier?

 

In ten years on the job, I've never had a person get angry with me after I deliver bad news in response to a coordinate check. ("Wow, thanks for letting me know, I'm glad I didn't waste time hiking all the way out there.") People who learn about a cache saturation guideline problem after hiding their cache container get mad at me on a monthly basis. ("You are being very inflexible. Your house is where fun goes to die.")

 

I have always been of the opinion that I didn't want to, nor should I have to bother the reviewers with coordinate checks. Your post gives me a better perspective on this. Thanks.

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