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Who should be allowed to develop earthcaches?


danieloliveira
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I've seen earthcaches (EC's) developed by those who know exactly what they're talking about and hence develop strong, and well researched EC's and also by those who simply find a "interesting spot" and develop weak and poorly researched EC's.

 

Who should be allowed to develop earthcaches? Those with a background in the earth sciences or just simply everyone?

Edited by danieloliveira
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Who should be allowed to develop earthcaches? Those with a background in the earth sciences or just simply everyone?

 

What Level of background of earth science do you think should be acceptable? a degree? Masters?

 

Or just someone who watches the National Geo channel once in awhile?

 

I think you need to remember geocaching is just a game. Also, if geoaware publishes them, then one would presume they cut the mustard? ;)

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Who should be allowed to develop earthcaches? Those with a background in the earth sciences or just simply everyone?

 

What Level of background of earth science do you think should be acceptable? a degree? Masters?

 

Or just someone who watches the National Geo channel once in awhile?

 

I think you need to remember geocaching is just a game. Also, if geoaware publishes them, then one would presume they cut the mustard? ;)

 

Thanks for your input and you tell me if they should need a degree. That's why I launched the topic. ;)

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All cachers are invited to create earthcaches. From my experience, the degreed experts are very willing to share their knowledge, provide explanations, offer resources, correct mistakes, and one even took part of a day to provide a personal tour of a wetlands.

 

Many resources are availiable: geological county maps, links on wikipedia, libraries, local county geologists, publications, earthscience teachers in public schools, university staff, TerryDad2, and local earthcache developers

 

I have visited well developed earthcaches and "lame" earthcaches. To me what makes the difference is the writing abilities of the creater. Content included, signifance, and method to increase the cachers knowledge of the unique area, tasks. The earthcaches I have developed include a lot of content about the formations because that is what I enjoy reading. Creative writing is a very weak skill, so use a lot of the content from publications.

 

My opinion, I like visiting springs, but have measured temp and pH so much that they are now lame caches. Enjoy visiting the spots because now I understand the unique features of springs and enjoy the scenery, and historical aspects of the sites.

 

Thanks to earthcaches, I now tour Minnesota and recognize the various types of features and am amazed how truely wonderful and the power of Mother Nature.

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I don't think you should need a degree, but you should need to be able to contribute a reasonable amount of significant information to support the site. Either by research, by copying already available info or by consulting someone who knows about the site intimately. The whole point is to provide education about our planet so I believe that is priority one.

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Anyone has and should have the opportunity to develop an Earthcache, regardless of one’s formal education. Let’s keep in mind that these are to be created with the comprehensive level of a teenager and non science folks and not the level of a PhD in Structural Geology.

 

I for one will and do offer assistance to others in creating an Earthcahce (“EC”).

I would much rather see someone create their 1st, EC and work their way up the Masters Program than to secretly create this on my own, even having reached the Platinum Level. Often, if I find an area of interest I will first offer it up [on a local forum] to someone so that another person can experience the development of an EC in hopes this will give them the “experience” others may want to seek.

 

Yes, I have a BS in Geology and a MS in Earth Science, so I guess others may see me as “Qualified”. More importantly, I have a professional responsibility to this approach. Look I’m not buckin’ for sainthood here, but perhaps a better question would be “How many of “us” do the same?” I’m willing to bet most if not all of us… For me "mentoring" is the true measure of “experience”…

 

So much for the "soapbox"

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Anyone has and should have the opportunity to develop an Earthcache, regardless of one’s formal education. Let’s keep in mind that these are to be created with the comprehensive level of a teenager and non science folks and not the level of a PhD in Structural Geology.

 

I for one will and do offer assistance to others in creating an Earthcahce (“EC”).

I would much rather see someone create their 1st, EC and work their way up the Masters Program than to secretly create this on my own, even having reached the Platinum Level. Often, if I find an area of interest I will first offer it up [on a local forum] to someone so that another person can experience the development of an EC in hopes this will give them the “experience” others may want to seek.

 

Yes, I have a BS in Geology and a MS in Earth Science, so I guess others may see me as “Qualified”. More importantly, I have a professional responsibility to this approach. Look I’m not buckin’ for sainthood here, but perhaps a better question would be “How many of “us” do the same?” I’m willing to bet most if not all of us… For me "mentoring" is the true measure of “experience”…

 

So much for the "soapbox"

 

Clap, clap, clap! Well done.

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Anyone has and should have the opportunity to develop an Earthcache, regardless of one’s formal education. Let’s keep in mind that these are to be created with the comprehensive level of a teenager and non science folks and not the level of a PhD in Structural Geology.

 

I for one will and do offer assistance to others in creating an Earthcahce (“EC”).

......

 

I’m willing to bet most if not all of us… For me "mentoring" is the true measure of “experience”…

 

So much for the "soapbox"

I know several folks who do exactly the same thing--or something similar. Of course, there is always that one guy in any area that has the "mine, all mine" attitude but they are fortunately few and far between. Most folks would prefer to see lots of people making earthcaches, so they can enjoy finding them!

 

Most people who go through the process learn enough along the way to create accurate caches, even if they don't have any expertise in the field. Even if you have a background in geology, you can't be a specialist in "everything" ( I know, I've tried!) --if you pay attention, even someone who has been in the field fr decades can still learn new things.

 

The nice thing about earthcaches is that the people who review them for publishing know their geology, and can make good suggestions if someone makes a glaring error. Other than that, the cache page can always be changed even after publishing, so if you run across an earthcache that has info that is grieviously wrong, you can always let them know about it in a friendly way --and they can reword it to provide the correct info.

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Anyone has and should have the opportunity to develop an Earthcache, regardless of one’s formal education. Let’s keep in mind that these are to be created with the comprehensive level of a teenager and non science folks and not the level of a PhD in Structural Geology.

 

I for one will and do offer assistance to others in creating an Earthcahce (“EC”).

......

 

I’m willing to bet most if not all of us… For me "mentoring" is the true measure of “experience”…

 

So much for the "soapbox"

I know several folks who do exactly the same thing--or something similar. Of course, there is always that one guy in any area that has the "mine, all mine" attitude but they are fortunately few and far between. Most folks would prefer to see lots of people making earthcaches, so they can enjoy finding them!

 

Most people who go through the process learn enough along the way to create accurate caches, even if they don't have any expertise in the field. Even if you have a background in geology, you can't be a specialist in "everything" ( I know, I've tried!) --if you pay attention, even someone who has been in the field fr decades can still learn new things.

 

The nice thing about earthcaches is that the people who review them for publishing know their geology, and can make good suggestions if someone makes a glaring error. Other than that, the cache page can always be changed even after publishing, so if you run across an earthcache that has info that is grieviously wrong, you can always let them know about it in a friendly way --and they can reword it to provide the correct info.

 

I agree with you that even if you're in the earth sciences you cannot be an expert at everything. The field of the earth sciences is so vast that the possibilities are endless. However, you have an advantage over the others because you can spot an EC " a mile away " :D whereas others would take a little longer to recognise the potential of a site or feature.

 

The other thing that I've experienced is that the "icon hunters" want (very much) a EC icon in their owned list and as a result I have been approached by other cachers to create EC's for them - isn't that cool? The only problem I have is to find themes and the time to do it all.

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I know several folks who do exactly the same thing--or something similar. Of course, there is always that one guy in any area that has the "mine, all mine" attitude but they are fortunately few and far between. Most folks would prefer to see lots of people making earthcaches, so they can enjoy finding them!

 

Most people who go through the process learn enough along the way to create accurate caches, even if they don't have any expertise in the field. Even if you have a background in geology, you can't be a specialist in "everything" ( I know, I've tried!) --if you pay attention, even someone who has been in the field fr decades can still learn new things.

 

The nice thing about earthcaches is that the people who review them for publishing know their geology, and can make good suggestions if someone makes a glaring error. Other than that, the cache page can always be changed even after publishing, so if you run across an earthcache that has info that is grieviously wrong, you can always let them know about it in a friendly way --and they can reword it to provide the correct info.

I put together an Earthcache Setup Primer to try to get people interested in setting up earthcaches. The event had a good turnout with 30+ people. I walked through the steps to choose a location, where and how to find the information in books, internet, and library, how to contact the land manager, and what would be expected in on the cache page. I went as far as to provide a field trip guide (by the GSA) with 30+ potential locaitons, provided the contact information, and even prepared the land manager that people may be contacting him to get approval. (I knew he would approve them as he already approved many of my others in the area). Then I took a group up to look at one of the field trip spots and showed them how to set it up and develop the questions.

 

Out of that, one EarthCache was developed. You would think with all that hand holding there would have been a few more. So it seems, EarthCache development is not for everyone, but if you want the help there are those of us out there that are perfectly willing to give you a hand.

 

I've got a list a mile long of places where I'd love to set up an earthcache. I'll never get to them all, so I'd be happy to suggest a few locations. Even where it looks like I've got a buch of EarthCaches, there are often other nearby locations with different subjects that should still be made into EarthCaches (and I've already got the contact info for you).

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I am interested in creating an Earthcache but I am not sure how to start. Any hints where to look for unique spots for Earthcaches?

 

Any local tourist areas that people are drawn to because of rocks? Scenic caves? giant stone pillars? Its quite possible that an earthcache hasnt been set up for them yet!

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I am interested in creating an Earthcache but I am not sure how to start. Any hints where to look for unique spots for Earthcaches?

 

Thanks.

 

I live in Pennsylvania.

 

Is there anything that strikes you as "different" in your scenery? That is probably a good place to start. If you need further help, post some pics and teh community will surely help you.

 

I am interested in creating an Earthcache but I am not sure how to start. Any hints where to look for unique spots for Earthcaches?

 

Any local tourist areas that people are drawn to because of rocks? Scenic caves? giant stone pillars? Its quite possible that an earthcache hasnt been set up for them yet!

 

That's a good place to start

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I am interested in creating an Earthcache but I am not sure how to start. Any hints where to look for unique spots for Earthcaches?

 

Thanks.

 

I live in Pennsylvania.

The GSA has a field guide for the area. I don't know if the sites listed in it have been used yet.

 

The Pittsburgh Geological Society has a few free downloadable guides. Plus some others if you are willing to spend a few bucks.

 

You can start with google searches on Pennsylvania and geology and field guide. Once you find a place move on to related searches.

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I am interested in creating an Earthcache but I am not sure how to start. Any hints where to look for unique spots for Earthcaches?

 

Thanks.

 

I live in Pennsylvania.

 

I'm not sure if anyone has mentioned PA's Geological Survey?

Just go into the PA DCNR [Dept. of Conservation and Natural Resources] Web Site and look for Geology and this should take you to TGS [Topographic and Geologic Survey]. They have a number of publications. Their Educational Series is written for the non-science type. They also have a publication known as Pennsylvania Geology both are free downloads.

You might find some ideas w/the PA State Parks also part of DCNR Web Site.

 

I’m sure other State Geological Surveys have similar information.

 

BTW… TerryDad2

Thanks for the PGS plug. They’re a good bunch of people.

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