Jump to content

Help me with this earthcache concept...


elrojo14
Followers 1

Recommended Posts

I'm no scientarian, but that there looks like a cliff to me. :anitongue:

 

OK, seriously. I'm at the office, and apparently our net nanny is blocking the goo.gl link. So I don't see where this is. There might be enough to observe here that you can build a lesson on physical weathering - what is causing the jointed cracks to form here? - and biological weathering - how are the lichen, and the plants growing out of the cracks, affecting the rocks?

 

The second photo has black streaks of what appears to be desert varnish.

 

I can't tell what kind of rocks these are, because I am terrible at identifying rocks. The second photo could possibly have some basalt in it - those fractured rocks near the top look similar to how basalt looks when columns of it break away.

 

If a no kidding geologist doesn't come along, your next best bet might be to look for a local geology resource that identifies what this is and talks about what can be learned here. 

  • Upvote 1
Link to comment

Not knowing the basic geology there (sedimentary or igneous, although it looks like sandstone and/or limestone) I still think you can have visitors answer why they think the columns are so high and so wide. What about the geology there created columns and not one big flat cliff face?

That could come after a write-up about the type of rock and how the cliff formed, uplift or erosion or whatever.

Even without looking I know there are many EarthCaches out there that profile rock columns.

Good Luck!

Link to comment

I start by reading everything I could about the geology of the Kern River Valley. I'd look for science articles and geologic field trips that focus on the area between the  Forks of the Kern Trail and the Little Kern River. It may have a special name, you'd know better than me, being local. Just the quick search I did shows a lot of very cool geologic formations in the area. I was surprised not to find more EarthCaches nearby. I found this one old thesis write up on the entire area---it's not tooooo technical. This site has photos that ID certain features of the area. Even if you don't find anything that looks like what you have, at least you can rule out things your site isn't. Check with your state geology department to see if they have articles on the area. I found one that said this:

Quote

The South Fork Kern River at its northern reaches is made up of intrusive (granite) and extrusive (lava) material near the Golden Trout Volcanic field. It drops rapidly from Inyo National Forest through granitic canyons into the Domeland Wilderness of the Sequoia National Forest and Bureau of Land Management.

Is your location in any of those particularly named places?

I know how daunting it can be to start. I have one EarthCache that I really had to work to figure out what I was looking at. I did a lot of reading up and a lot of searching, for days. (And I taught Earth Science, so while I'm not an expert, I did know the basics of geology). It is still the EarthCache I am most proud of and enjoy reading the logs from.

  • Upvote 1
Link to comment

Neos2 shared some great resources, and a great overall approach.

I'll add a tidbit -- it's really hard to tell based on the photos, but it looks like there might be some columnar jointing going on there in those cliffs, and that is often seen in rocks that derive from volcanic flows. There is basalt and andesite (extrusive volcanic rocks), I believe, in that general region, so those pieces may fit. Here's another resource, from a good source (not sure if it hits exactly the right area), that may be of some assistance: FIELD GUIDE - GEOLOGY AND MINING HISTORY OF THE KERN CANYON, LAKE ISABELLA AND WALKER BASIN, KERN COUNTY CALIFORNIA - Gregg Wilkerson 2017

--Matt Dawson, GSA Education Programs Manager

  • Upvote 1
Link to comment

Thank you everyone. Yes I believe that area is volcanic. Most of the region has granite and lighter colored dirt. That particular area has very red dirt and you can tell it is different than the rest of the area. It is very close to the Kern River Canyon and I believe its steep walls might have been created by both erosion and ancient glacial activity. However, these cliffs are a bit different and at the top of the canyon. I will see what I can come up with and post the end result. Though the area might not be accessible again until May or June. And a huge fire swept through about a month or so after I took these photos and the area has not been opened to the public since. 

Link to comment
On 2/26/2021 at 1:01 PM, Neos2 said:

I start by reading everything I could about the geology of the Kern River Valley. I'd look for science articles and geologic field trips that focus on the area between the  Forks of the Kern Trail and the Little Kern River. It may have a special name, you'd know better than me, being local. Just the quick search I did shows a lot of very cool geologic formations in the area. I was surprised not to find more EarthCaches nearby. I found this one old thesis write up on the entire area---it's not tooooo technical. This site has photos that ID certain features of the area. Even if you don't find anything that looks like what you have, at least you can rule out things your site isn't. Check with your state geology department to see if they have articles on the area. I found one that said this:

Is your location in any of those particularly named places?

I know how daunting it can be to start. I have one EarthCache that I really had to work to figure out what I was looking at. I did a lot of reading up and a lot of searching, for days. (And I taught Earth Science, so while I'm not an expert, I did know the basics of geology). It is still the EarthCache I am most proud of and enjoy reading the logs from.

 

Here are some photos from one of your links that are at the same exact area. 
 

http://150mph.planetrambler.com/080913-14_KernRiver/080913_665.jpg

 

http://150mph.planetrambler.com/080913-14_KernRiver/080913_662.jpg

 

I did read through quite a bit of that old technical write up with help of CTRL-F and looking up references to the Little Kern River and I believe the lava flows occurred before the fault line and river came through. So it makes sense that these lava looking formations are now exposed on top of this river canyon. I think I can do something with all of this. Thank you everyone! 

  • Funny 1
Link to comment

So how about this?

 

Kern Canyon Lava

 

Robert Webb published his "Geology of a Portion of the Southern Sierra Nevada of California: The Northern Kernville Quadrangle" in 1936. In his paper he describes that Kern Canyon Fault and its relationship with the Kern River and Kern River Canyon. Webb concluded that the undisturbed lava flows in the area you are standing in indicated that the lava had been established before the fault and the Kern River.

Your mission is examine these cliffs and determine if you agree with his conclusions

Logging Requirements

Please contact me and provide the requested evidence.

1. Note the shape of the rocks here. How do they compare to the composition of The Needles rock formations that prominently stand 2.5 miles southwest of your location?

2. Do you think these rock cliffs were exposed by erosion or did this lava push up into its current location along this canyon? So then which came first? The lava or the canyon?

3. Post a photo at the location of you making an L with your hand or just a photo of a hand making an L.

  • Surprised 1
Link to comment

I have a similar problem to the OP. I have found an interesting rock feature  (which I think would be good for an EC) but have no idea what it is which makes it hard to research. 

Orange rings of various sizes in, I think, igneous rock. Ring sizes vary up to about a metre diameter. The rock inside and outside the rings looks appears to be the same. Imagine a 44 gallon drum set in rock with the esposed part rusted away. My own (ignorant) guess is that it may have at one time been an iron(?) bubble in magma. Can anyone point me to how I may find out.

Not far away is exposed rock with stumps of trees that were engulfed during a volcanic event, but at a lower elevation.

Link to comment
1 hour ago, colleda said:

I have a similar problem to the OP. I have found an interesting rock feature  (which I think would be good for an EC) but have no idea what it is which makes it hard to research. 

Orange rings of various sizes in, I think, igneous rock. Ring sizes vary up to about a metre diameter. The rock inside and outside the rings looks appears to be the same. Imagine a 44 gallon drum set in rock with the esposed part rusted away. My own (ignorant) guess is that it may have at one time been an iron(?) bubble in magma. Can anyone point me to how I may find out.

Not far away is exposed rock with stumps of trees that were engulfed during a volcanic event, but at a lower elevation.

 

Could they be Liesegang rings? We see them in the sandstone around here. Here's an example I found online which sort of matches your description:

 

Liesegang_rings_-_Formaci%C3%B3n_La-Serr

Link to comment
1 hour ago, barefootjeff said:

 

Could they be Liesegang rings? We see them in the sandstone around here. Here's an example I found online which sort of matches your description:

 

Liesegang_rings_-_Formaci%C3%B3n_La-Serr

Not like those. They are large single rings. I took some photos which I now can't find. I'll go back and take some more. They are ground level above cliffs,  between #7 & #8 of my Two Beaches series.

Edited by colleda
Link to comment

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
Followers 1
×
×
  • Create New...