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goosefraba1

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Hello,

I'm new to the Earthcaching portion of Groundspeak. I've read the guidelines... but was wondering something. I know that Earthcaches are to be primarily about the geology spectrum of earth sciences. I was wondering if there is a restriction on Indian Mound caches. These are both A) archaelogical and B) a lasting effect on the geology of an area (of course unless we bulldoze or there is another ice age full of glaciers). There is a series of mounds in the town where I work that I would like to write up an Earthcache for and present to the city park officials for approval, but just wondering if this would be allowed before I go through the work.

 

Thanks for your comments!

Zach

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Welcome to EarthCaching! Have you read the EarthCache Knowledge Book?

 

As far as I know, Indian Mounds themselves wouldn't be allowed on their own merit as an EarthCache under the current guidelines. However, it's possible to focus on the geology of the area and incorporate the information on the Mounds/the Mound builders into the write up. Effigy Mounds is an EarthCache that does that.

 

There are other mound EarthCaches. Some do not focus much on the geology of the area, so I didn't point them out as examples. Still, they have good geological information, so they are worth studying. If you go to the Advanced Search link at EarthCache org you can chose a country and a "classification" type of EarthCache to search. Then you can scan the list to find EarthCaches you are interested in looking over. I chose "Historical Sites" to look for anything with 'mounds' in the name.

 

If you need help figuring out how to present the EarthCache with a focus on the geology, there are plenty of us here that would gladly help you.

Edited by Neos2

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Hello,

I'm new to the Earthcaching portion of Groundspeak. I've read the guidelines... but was wondering something. I know that Earthcaches are to be primarily about the geology spectrum of earth sciences. I was wondering if there is a restriction on Indian Mound caches. These are both A) archaelogical and B) a lasting effect on the geology of an area (of course unless we bulldoze or there is another ice age full of glaciers). There is a series of mounds in the town where I work that I would like to write up an Earthcache for and present to the city park officials for approval, but just wondering if this would be allowed before I go through the work.

 

Thanks for your comments!

Zach

Is there a 'restriction on Indian Mounds'? Who knows? Some have been approved in the past and there is no way of knowing if or how many haven't been approved. While we like Indian mounds very much, it's a stretch to show geological implications. Piled up dirt is piled up dirt no matter what it may contain. The grand daddy of Indian mounds is the Cahokia Mounds State Historic Site just outside of St. Louis, MO. It is wonderful and well worth the visit. We have all heard of Inca, Aztec and Mayan ruins, but most don't know of our ancient Indian city which at one time had a population of thousands. Other than dirt being carried basket by basket to build structures several stories high, it's hard to see the geology of it, but we are glad it was approved. :)

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Maybe these will help?

A Cryptozological EarthCache by BiT | GC111XN | Ohio

Geometric Mounds by lovey pigs | GC1D9GD | Ohio

Giant Pre-Historic Snake by mr. bloodhound | GC1308E | Ohio

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Maybe these will help?

A Cryptozological EarthCache by BiT | GC111XN | Ohio

Geometric Mounds by lovey pigs | GC1D9GD | Ohio

Giant Pre-Historic Snake by mr. bloodhound | GC1308E | Ohio

 

I've been to "Giant Pre-Historic Snake by mr. bloodhound".... although this is before I knew about Earthcaches. I will have to go back. The mound is actually built beside what is thought to be a crater. So, that would definitely have to be geology based. I will see what I can come up with as far as the site in Ashland, Ky. If I can't figure a way to submit it based with at least some geological basis, then I won't submit it.

 

I'm thinking that the park in which the remaining mounds are (there used to be many more) used to be a flood plain before the flood wall was built.

 

On a side note, the Portsmouth, Ohio region used to be very rich in mounds, but we tore them down to build a couple of towns. Only two remain nearby, horseshoe mound and one in south portsmouth, KY.

 

This is what they used to look like... covering an area of about 5 miles... and connecting on the other side of the river in KY.

 

Portsmouth_Works_Group_A_B_C_D_Squier_and_Davis_01.jpg

 

picture of the Ashland Park mounds

 

image004.jpg

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Some of the Hopewell and Adena Culture Mounds have a solar and/or lunar calendar reference.

Perhaps???

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Some of the Hopewell and Adena Culture Mounds have a solar and/or lunar calendar reference.

Perhaps???

 

It's tough to tell with the Ashland mounds because there used be many more than there are today. These could have very well been used as a type of solar or lunar calendar, but it is tough to tell with so few remaining :/

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Have a look at GC19BCY Loughton Camp Iron Age Hill Fort for an example of an earth cache featuring an iron age hill fort.

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Hmmm... I'm going to consult with Mr. Bloodhound nearby. Maybe get some more Earthcaches under my belt before pursuing the creation of a mound/flood plain idea for an earthcache. Thank you all for pointing me in the right direction.

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Hello,

I'm new to the Earthcaching portion of Groundspeak. I've read the guidelines... but was wondering something. I know that Earthcaches are to be primarily about the geology spectrum of earth sciences. I was wondering if there is a restriction on Indian Mound caches. These are both A) archaelogical and B) a lasting effect on the geology of an area (of course unless we bulldoze or there is another ice age full of glaciers). There is a series of mounds in the town where I work that I would like to write up an Earthcache for and present to the city park officials for approval, but just wondering if this would be allowed before I go through the work.

 

Thanks for your comments!

Zach

Is there a 'restriction on Indian Mounds'? Who knows? Some have been approved in the past and there is no way of knowing if or how many haven't been approved. While we like Indian mounds very much, it's a stretch to show geological implications. Piled up dirt is piled up dirt no matter what it may contain. The grand daddy of Indian mounds is the Cahokia Mounds State Historic Site just outside of St. Louis, MO. It is wonderful and well worth the visit. We have all heard of Inca, Aztec and Mayan ruins, but most don't know of our ancient Indian city which at one time had a population of thousands. Other than dirt being carried basket by basket to build structures several stories high, it's hard to see the geology of it, but we are glad it was approved. :)

Sadly KK, Native American mounds are no longer accepted. We still have the one called the Ely Mound in Rose Hill, Va. I listed it as a Waymark also. Hopefully the new virtual category will cover mounds. EarthCaching is just not what it used to be, and not many users in our area are interested in trying to list one.

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Geowalker had a good idea with the reason for a particular layout...

 

It's been 11 years since I was in college, but back then I was working on a minor in Art History and my specialty was art of the Native American Woodland peoples (The Indians of Ohio, Indiana, Kentucky etc) and especially the changes in their art as they were pushed westward. To research that, I had to know a little about the earlier people in the area. Like I said, it's been years but as I recall:

 

the Adena peoples had really extensive trade routes (into South America)

burials often included specific minerals (graphite, manganese, red and yellow ocher)

they made tools and dishes from stone as well as bone

they used copper

they used shells

they made awesome clay pipes, with intricate figures

 

All of which says they either settled near places where you could find those materials locally, or they were located on the trading route to get those items from distant locations. That might offer you some ideas about things to look for in the area that have a geologic connection.

 

I know the later groups (Hopewell, Woodland) were agriculturists and had permanent settlements, but the earlier groups (Adena) were pretty nomadic hunter and gatherer types. The thinking among archaeologists is the burial chambers were significant because they needed a lot of people to create them--so they represented smaller groups getting together for ceremonial or at least political reasons. That probably means they chose a central location to meet. That ought to help you center your search area.

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That will definitely help with a write up. I think I'm going to do some research on where the floods would normally be without the floodwalls and dams.... I'm assuming that the placement of the mounds should be above the normal flood zone because the tribes were very observant. (why would you build a mound in a flood zone?) Will also include the trade routes.... With what might be in the mounds. I don't want to include false information. Might go along the lines of the old..... 300 years ago, this area was much different.

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The statement "Native American mounds are no longer accepted" is not accurate.

 

Native American mounds can still get published as an EarthCache, provided there is a strong, location-specific earth science component and lesson.

 

This is also the case with springs, waterfalls, erratics, etc. (Statements that these are no longer accepted are also not true.)

 

Ultimately, your local reviewer will work with you to help guide your cache to the publishing stage.

 

With the tips you've received here already, you seem to be well on your way! We look forward to reviewing your work. :)

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The statement "Native American mounds are no longer accepted" is not accurate.

 

Native American mounds can still get published as an EarthCache, provided there is a strong, location-specific earth science component and lesson.

 

This is also the case with springs, waterfalls, erratics, etc. (Statements that these are no longer accepted are also not true.)

 

Ultimately, your local reviewer will work with you to help guide your cache to the publishing stage.

 

With the tips you've received here already, you seem to be well on your way! We look forward to reviewing your work. :)

All this is confusing. I thought changes were made some time ago and all new listings had to be related to geology? I sort of dropped the EC thing after that and have not kept up with them. Seems the guidelines have changed some or more than once.

[edit to add]

 

I have a waterfall that I was planning on submitting on Waymarking. Let me give it a try and see what I can work out with the reviewer to listit here.

Edited by Manville Possum Hunters

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The statement "Native American mounds are no longer accepted" is not accurate.

 

Native American mounds can still get published as an EarthCache, provided there is a strong, location-specific earth science component and lesson.

All this is confusing. I thought changes were made some time ago and all new listings had to be related to geology?

 

Geology is a somewhat narrow field (rocks and minerals), which is why earth science is a better term. But at the same time, we might think Earth Science covers all the sciences rather than the subset used for EarthCaches.

 

To me, an Indian Mound is an archaeological site. It has nothing to do with the natural forces that created the Earth. However, if they can find a way to relate the Indian Mounds to an appropriate Earth Science topic, then it would be allowed. For example, erosion - if the Indian Mounds were deteriorating due to erosion, then you could build an EarthCache around that topic. Or, as someone else suggested, go into details about site selection - what features of the local topography would have factored into the selection of this site for their burial ground?

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The statement "Native American mounds are no longer accepted" is not accurate.

 

Native American mounds can still get published as an EarthCache, provided there is a strong, location-specific earth science component and lesson.

All this is confusing. I thought changes were made some time ago and all new listings had to be related to geology?

 

Geology is a somewhat narrow field (rocks and minerals), which is why earth science is a better term. But at the same time, we might think Earth Science covers all the sciences rather than the subset used for EarthCaches.

 

To me, an Indian Mound is an archaeological site. It has nothing to do with the natural forces that created the Earth. However, if they can find a way to relate the Indian Mounds to an appropriate Earth Science topic, then it would be allowed. For example, erosion - if the Indian Mounds were deteriorating due to erosion, then you could build an EarthCache around that topic. Or, as someone else suggested, go into details about site selection - what features of the local topography would have factored into the selection of this site for their burial ground?

I have to agree. I enjoy EarthCaches, but the change in guidelines only confused me.

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Goosefrabal

 

 

I’m looking at the circular structure on the KY side of the Ohio. I’m wondering if the entries are base on the magnetic declination of North? I’m drawn to the profile and I’m wondering if the shadow of the center mound casts on the rings to signify the change in seasons. Is there a local professor at a university that could help you out on this angle?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Portsmouth_Works_Group_C_Squier_and_Davis_01.jpg

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That will definitely help with a write up. I think I'm going to do some research on where the floods would normally be without the floodwalls and dams.... I'm assuming that the placement of the mounds should be above the normal flood zone because the tribes were very observant. (why would you build a mound in a flood zone?) Will also include the trade routes.... With what might be in the mounds. I don't want to include false information. Might go along the lines of the old..... 300 years ago, this area was much different.

 

Make sure to check the FEMA Website. They do issue flood maps. They also have a GIS program, HAZUS, that allows one to tinker w/the variables to project flood damage potential, both spacial and economic.

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Goosefrabal

 

 

I’m looking at the circular structure on the KY side of the Ohio. I’m wondering if the entries are base on the magnetic declination of North? I’m drawn to the profile and I’m wondering if the shadow of the center mound casts on the rings to signify the change in seasons. Is there a local professor at a university that could help you out on this angle?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Portsmouth_Works_Group_C_Squier_and_Davis_01.jpg

 

Unforunately, that particular mound has been almost entirely destroyed through farming :/ There are many, many mounds in this area... specially in the Chilocothe, Ohio area. I am thinking about also trying to develop a cache at mound city (a hopewell mound area)... it is a National Heritage Park... so that might make getting permission a little bit more difficult. There are about 20 mounds within about 20 acres at that area :blink:. Found within the mounds during excavation were mica mirrors (from North Carolina), obsidian knives, copper (from Lake Superior) ornaments in shape of frogs, serpents, etc, shark teeth (from at least 600 miles away). The trade routes were immense. Also, these mounds seem to be just above the normal flood plain area. As a safety precaution (I'm assuming) the Hopewells also built a 5 foot high retaining wall to keep high water out.

 

As far as the Ashland, KY mounds, I haven't had much time to do more research yet or get permission because I am currently taking my Organic Chem class... so when it is over I will try to start. Thanks for the FEMA maps idea. I will look into that... the only thing is that I don't know if that will show the difference between river flooding with dams, flood gates, and flood walls into play. I will have to check into it.

 

Thanks, Zach

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Goosefrabal

 

 

I’m looking at the circular structure on the KY side of the Ohio. I’m wondering if the entries are base on the magnetic declination of North? I’m drawn to the profile and I’m wondering if the shadow of the center mound casts on the rings to signify the change in seasons. Is there a local professor at a university that could help you out on this angle?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Portsmouth_Works_Group_C_Squier_and_Davis_01.jpg

 

Unforunately, that particular mound has been almost entirely destroyed through farming :/ There are many, many mounds in this area... specially in the Chilocothe, Ohio area. I am thinking about also trying to develop a cache at mound city (a hopewell mound area)... it is a National Heritage Park... so that might make getting permission a little bit more difficult. There are about 20 mounds within about 20 acres at that area :blink:. Found within the mounds during excavation were mica mirrors (from North Carolina), obsidian knives, copper (from Lake Superior) ornaments in shape of frogs, serpents, etc, shark teeth (from at least 600 miles away). The trade routes were immense. Also, these mounds seem to be just above the normal flood plain area. As a safety precaution (I'm assuming) the Hopewells also built a 5 foot high retaining wall to keep high water out.

 

As far as the Ashland, KY mounds, I haven't had much time to do more research yet or get permission because I am currently taking my Organic Chem class... so when it is over I will try to start. Thanks for the FEMA maps idea. I will look into that... the only thing is that I don't know if that will show the difference between river flooding with dams, flood gates, and flood walls into play. I will have to check into it.

 

Thanks, Zach

 

Zach,

Mound City Group--- Try the Ohio Historical Society, they may have jusitiction over the area and are receptive to ECs. I have one at Flint Ridge out near Brownsville.

 

FEMA Maps--- May show the extent of flooding given a floodwall or floodgate breach. Remember they are trying to determine the affects of disasters. If not use a contour map say, 7.5' Topo.

Mark

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Unforunately, that particular mound has been almost entirely destroyed through farming :/ There are many, many mounds in this area... specially in the Chilocothe, Ohio area. I am thinking about also trying to develop a cache at mound city (a hopewell mound area)... it is a National Heritage Park... so that might make getting permission a little bit more difficult. There are about 20 mounds within about 20 acres at that area . Found within the mounds during excavation were mica mirrors (from North Carolina), obsidian knives, copper (from Lake Superior) ornaments in shape of frogs, serpents, etc, shark teeth (from at least 600 miles away). The trade routes were immense.

 

I recently visited a similar mound that farming has almost destroyed, and another in the middle of a town with buildings all around. I plan on trying to list them as EarthCaches. I have found mica and arrow pionts made from coral, as well as the little objects known as Woodland cones made from local iron ore. Also a copper celt came from near the site, and I suspect it was from the Great Lakes of the North. I'm sure that the place was once a village and there is one mound still present in the area and one that has been destroyed by farming. Some of the points that I have found are made from Jasper, and was likely quarryed 100 miles away. Those trade routes were immense, and the local one near my location is where the trade and war route split. One trail linked the Shawnee in Ohio with the Cherokee in Tennessee. Along this route is another mound that is a listed EarthCache, and Clovis points have been found in the area. Evidence that I have found tells me that the Native Americans were here much earlier that thought. The Yucchi were here long before the Cherokee, and truth be told it was genocide that removed them.

I feel like developing EC's at these sites help preserve our history, but there is always a certin amount of dread that I have when submitting one because I may not know enough about geology as I do Native culture.

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Mounds really are in a grey area of Earthcaching and require a sound Earth science basis to be published. I would suggest reading the published ones to see how cache owners have worked the Earth science into the descriptions...and work at doing an even better job (to make sure you meet the guidelines).

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Mounds really are in a grey area of Earthcaching and require a sound Earth science basis to be published. I would suggest reading the published ones to see how cache owners have worked the Earth science into the descriptions...and work at doing an even better job (to make sure you meet the guidelines).

I have researched some of the listed ones that I can find, and read the guidelines. What I'm afraid of is that mounds really are in a grey area and my Earth science may not be strong enough. Based on what I have read in this thread I think that I have more to work with, but yes the listings will have quite a bit of information on Native culture, but these people lived off of the land and used stone tools, ect. Maybe if we work together we can come up with something workable?

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Mounds really are in a grey area of Earthcaching and require a sound Earth science basis to be published. I would suggest reading the published ones to see how cache owners have worked the Earth science into the descriptions...and work at doing an even better job (to make sure you meet the guidelines).

I have researched some of the listed ones that I can find, and read the guidelines. What I'm afraid of is that mounds really are in a grey area and my Earth science may not be strong enough. Based on what I have read in this thread I think that I have more to work with, but yes the listings will have quite a bit of information on Native culture, but these people lived off of the land and used stone tools, ect. Maybe if we work together we can come up with something workable?

 

MPH.... maybe we can continue throwing ideas back and forth to each other. Truth be told.... I haven't put much effort into this recently because I've been busy trying to get into grad school. I am going to try to get ahold of Ohio historical in order to get permission, but I'm not sure if they have authority of a national secured land.... maybe they can point me in the correct direction, though.

 

I think that the trade routes and variety of different minerals/ stones is a decent foundation for approval. Throw in the flooding scenario with the wall.... and maybe local materials used to build the structures. Maybe that will be enough to start with. :unsure:

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Some of the Hopewell and Adena Culture Mounds have a solar and/or lunar calendar reference.

Perhaps???

Newbie here, but you are correct, Item C on the map is a solar clock. I am still finding out bare bones caching, but I know history some, and that is a solar clock predating Euro contact so far as that idea is known.

 

I don't know if there is historical caching sites. This place would be one to me.

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Unforunately, that particular mound has been almost entirely destroyed through farming :/ There are many, many mounds in this area... specially in the Chilocothe, Ohio area. I am thinking about also trying to develop a cache at mound city (a hopewell mound area)... it is a National Heritage Park... so that might make getting permission a little bit more difficult. There are about 20 mounds within about 20 acres at that area . Found within the mounds during excavation were mica mirrors (from North Carolina), obsidian knives, copper (from Lake Superior) ornaments in shape of frogs, serpents, etc, shark teeth (from at least 600 miles away). The trade routes were immense.

 

I recently visited a similar mound that farming has almost destroyed, and another in the middle of a town with buildings all around. I plan on trying to list them as EarthCaches. I have found mica and arrow pionts made from coral, as well as the little objects known as Woodland cones made from local iron ore. Also a copper celt came from near the site, and I suspect it was from the Great Lakes of the North. I'm sure that the place was once a village and there is one mound still present in the area and one that has been destroyed by farming. Some of the points that I have found are made from Jasper, and was likely quarryed 100 miles away. Those trade routes were immense, and the local one near my location is where the trade and war route split. One trail linked the Shawnee in Ohio with the Cherokee in Tennessee. Along this route is another mound that is a listed EarthCache, and Clovis points have been found in the area. Evidence that I have found tells me that the Native Americans were here much earlier that thought. The Yucchi were here long before the Cherokee, and truth be told it was genocide that removed them.

I feel like developing EC's at these sites help preserve our history, but there is always a certin amount of dread that I have when submitting one because I may not know enough about geology as I do Native culture.

 

I agree a lot has been lost to history thru farming, and theft from sites. I wouldn't doubt you have Munsungon Chert from northern Maine, which was traded as far as the western Great Lakes, as tool stone. If you have any cherts that are gray with black flects, or a maroon colored chert these both might be from Maine.

 

New science is opening the door for much earlier contacts and perhaps Euro contacts, in particular with clovis points, which are found more on the east coast than not.

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Mounds really are in a grey area of Earthcaching and require a sound Earth science basis to be published. I would suggest reading the published ones to see how cache owners have worked the Earth science into the descriptions...and work at doing an even better job (to make sure you meet the guidelines).

I have researched some of the listed ones that I can find, and read the guidelines. What I'm afraid of is that mounds really are in a grey area and my Earth science may not be strong enough. Based on what I have read in this thread I think that I have more to work with, but yes the listings will have quite a bit of information on Native culture, but these people lived off of the land and used stone tools, ect. Maybe if we work together we can come up with something workable?

 

MPH.... maybe we can continue throwing ideas back and forth to each other. Truth be told.... I haven't put much effort into this recently because I've been busy trying to get into grad school. I am going to try to get ahold of Ohio historical in order to get permission, but I'm not sure if they have authority of a national secured land.... maybe they can point me in the correct direction, though.

 

I think that the trade routes and variety of different minerals/ stones is a decent foundation for approval. Throw in the flooding scenario with the wall.... and maybe local materials used to build the structures. Maybe that will be enough to start with. :unsure:

I think there is interest in these Mounds and the geocommunity is interested in them. Working them into fitting guidelines is challanging. I visit EarthCaches for the WOW factor, but I have learned some about geology through EarthCaching. As far as write-up goes on many of these listings they all resemble. There is only so much that can be done with the same subject, but no two of the sites are exactly alike. I belive that support from the EarthCache community will help, but I feel we are more limited now than we were a few years ago with EC's. Truth be told, how many of us visit and log EC's for the learning experience? I never visited one to get educated, but learned some in the process of thrill seeking waterfalls and things that I find to be of natural beauty.

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I agree a lot has been lost to history thru farming, and theft from sites. I wouldn't doubt you have Munsungon Chert from northern Maine, which was traded as far as the western Great Lakes, as tool stone. If you have any cherts that are gray with black flects, or a maroon colored chert these both might be from Maine.

 

New science is opening the door for much earlier contacts and perhaps Euro contacts, in particular with clovis points, which are found more on the east coast than not.

 

Some of the Chert tools I have found here in the Virginia, Tennessee, Kentucky areas is a light tan color and is light in weight. I have seen some of the grey with black flecks, normally smaller points. One piece in my collection is a large, wide base spear type point about five inches in leangth. Our native flint is dark black, but grey is also common. I have a few with very long stems that I think are atal points. Also in one area I have found found some small clear points. Sugar Quartz is also found in the area, but not common. One Sugar Quartz piece I have is a Thunder Bird that was found local about 75 years ago. When I used to do farm work in the river bottoms when I was a boy I found a few of the fetish stones that are shaped like Turtles and one that looks like a buffalo. Some of the large blades that I have found have what looks to be cement on one side bonded to them. I was told by a old timer that those are likely burial items, and the cement looking stuff was a wood ash mixture that was poured over the burial. The last really nice relics I found came from Carter County Tennessee after the big flood. One Turkey Tail and a nice Dalton point. Any time I find a large blade I guess they are burial items. Many items that people find and call them arrow heads are just knapped down knives that got too short and were thrown away. I live in the area that the trade route became known as the Great Warriors Path, which part of it became known as the Daniel Boone Wilderness Trail. I have placed a series of geocaches along this route from Kingsport Tennessee to Cumberland Gap Kentucky. Hard to believe but in places the old wagon road can still be seen. If interested google up Chief Bob Benge, Dragging Canoe, and the Long Island of the Holston. Or take a peek at some of my geocache listings here.

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My uncle and I used to go "hunting" through the plow fields every spring and fall. My greatest treasure is an axe head.... not a tomahawk head.... . it is too broad for that. I also have a grinding stone, several pieces of pottery (not whole), some gray arrowheads that you speak of, and some red-brown arrowheads (the color of the flint at Flint Ridge, Ohio).

 

On a side not, my uncle found a burial mask hidden in a small chest in a cave near Ironton, Ohio. Who knows how it got there... the metal hinges on the chest hinted that it had been stolen. I think I remember him saying that the mask was made out of slate, but I do not know where that slate would have come from locally. My uncle passed away 10 years ago and my cousin has had the mask in a vault ever since.

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I agree a lot has been lost to history thru farming, and theft from sites. I wouldn't doubt you have Munsungon Chert from northern Maine, which was traded as far as the western Great Lakes, as tool stone. If you have any cherts that are gray with black flects, or a maroon colored chert these both might be from Maine.

 

New science is opening the door for much earlier contacts and perhaps Euro contacts, in particular with clovis points, which are found more on the east coast than not.

 

Some of the Chert tools I have found here in the Virginia, Tennessee, Kentucky areas is a light tan color and is light in weight. I have seen some of the grey with black flecks, normally smaller points. One piece in my collection is a large, wide base spear type point about five inches in leangth. Our native flint is dark black, but grey is also common. I have a few with very long stems that I think are atal points. Also in one area I have found found some small clear points. Sugar Quartz is also found in the area, but not common. One Sugar Quartz piece I have is a Thunder Bird that was found local about 75 years ago. When I used to do farm work in the river bottoms when I was a boy I found a few of the fetish stones that are shaped like Turtles and one that looks like a buffalo. Some of the large blades that I have found have what looks to be cement on one side bonded to them. I was told by a old timer that those are likely burial items, and the cement looking stuff was a wood ash mixture that was poured over the burial. The last really nice relics I found came from Carter County Tennessee after the big flood. One Turkey Tail and a nice Dalton point. Any time I find a large blade I guess they are burial items. Many items that people find and call them arrow heads are just knapped down knives that got too short and were thrown away. I live in the area that the trade route became known as the Great Warriors Path, which part of it became known as the Daniel Boone Wilderness Trail. I have placed a series of geocaches along this route from Kingsport Tennessee to Cumberland Gap Kentucky. Hard to believe but in places the old wagon road can still be seen. If interested google up Chief Bob Benge, Dragging Canoe, and the Long Island of the Holston. Or take a peek at some of my geocache listings here.

 

I wish I could have bumped into you when I was in the area. I spent around 90 days in Tn between the Cumberland Gap and Greenback. I will be googling up the info. I am new totally to geocaching, and would wonder about historical caches, if these can't be earth caches. But who an I to say.

 

We share a love for history, Early American. I am so new, that I have never even held a GPS in my hand yet, much less ever owned one. I am trying to get that sorted out, and not make some wild costly error in the doing.

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I am so new, that I have never even held a GPS in my hand yet, much less ever owned one. I am trying to get that sorted out, and not make some wild costly error in the doing.

 

Many EarthCaches as well as other type listings can be found without a GPS unit. I have used the driving directions from the cache page and google earth or some of my other maps to view the area. Urban caching is eazy this way, and with the new map layout on this site may be all you need. When you do get a GPS unit, look at some of the lower end Garmin units. Ebay can be a good source. I would like to have a real costly one that is able to communicate with the wireless beacons like the Garmin Chirps, but I won't shell out the money for one of the paperless units. I use a Venture HC most of the time. I used a map and compass before they "flipped the switch". I still carry a compass in my pack. I've been a hiker longer than geocaching has been around, and my first unit was used for recording locations of old cemeterys, as I'm also into geneology. There are some mounds and Native American burial sites that I would never disclose the location of on the internet. One of my listings, "Indian Grave Gap" which is the name of the mountain pass was a burial site that was looted many years ago. There is a village site nearby that is listed on the National Registery of Historic places, and the location is restricted. It is near Dungannon, Va. Quite sure that a mound existed there once, but farming has destroyed it. I remember the farm once had a different color of soil in the center, and it was a great site for surface hunting relics. I have tryed to pass my hobby of relic collecting and surface hunting to my children, and my young 10 year old daughter has really taken to it. My wife calls us rock collectors, which is true.

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I am so new, that I have never even held a GPS in my hand yet, much less ever owned one. I am trying to get that sorted out, and not make some wild costly error in the doing.

 

Many EarthCaches as well as other type listings can be found without a GPS unit. I have used the driving directions from the cache page and google earth or some of my other maps to view the area. Urban caching is eazy this way, and with the new map layout on this site may be all you need. When you do get a GPS unit, look at some of the lower end Garmin units. Ebay can be a good source. I would like to have a real costly one that is able to communicate with the wireless beacons like the Garmin Chirps, but I won't shell out the money for one of the paperless units. I use a Venture HC most of the time. I used a map and compass before they "flipped the switch". I still carry a compass in my pack. I've been a hiker longer than geocaching has been around, and my first unit was used for recording locations of old cemeterys, as I'm also into geneology. There are some mounds and Native American burial sites that I would never disclose the location of on the internet. One of my listings, "Indian Grave Gap" which is the name of the mountain pass was a burial site that was looted many years ago. There is a village site nearby that is listed on the National Registery of Historic places, and the location is restricted. It is near Dungannon, Va. Quite sure that a mound existed there once, but farming has destroyed it. I remember the farm once had a different color of soil in the center, and it was a great site for surface hunting relics. I have tryed to pass my hobby of relic collecting and surface hunting to my children, and my young 10 year old daughter has really taken to it. My wife calls us rock collectors, which is true.

Perhaps I have stated something incorrectly. I am 59 years, soon to be 60, and with a book, map and compass, ruller and pencil I can find anything I know about.

 

Having a used first time gps will open the door to what ever normal cache hunting is. Having someone like you will open another door to earth caching, or historical sites caching if there is such a thing. I agree not all should be opened to theft, burial raids, and over use of the few wild places left.

 

Places as you have allowed your children are ruined by farming, condo construction, parking lots, and other. Still in some ways these very items are a loss to the understanding and nature of the old ways, but your gains are yours, and I understand, as I have a smaller collection of plowed up items too.

 

Some things man does when he is ignorant, not stupid, just happen, as it can be hard to know what is buried a few inches down, when 250+ years have buried an artifact and then normal anything we do brings something to the surface.

 

I have been lucky to be able to work with the NH state geologist, and get to huntpaloe sites and cherts in Maine. We don't get to keep a thing, but atleast we can get a picture sometimes. I tend to not keep pictures of chards, which is about all that is found during these state digs.

 

I also do historical re-enacting, have spent years learning woodlands skills, and get in a lot of hiking (modern), and trecking (not so modern), and last miss the last of the truely wild places.

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I am so new, that I have never even held a GPS in my hand yet, much less ever owned one. I am trying to get that sorted out, and not make some wild costly error in the doing.

 

Many EarthCaches as well as other type listings can be found without a GPS unit. I have used the driving directions from the cache page and google earth or some of my other maps to view the area. Urban caching is eazy this way, and with the new map layout on this site may be all you need. When you do get a GPS unit, look at some of the lower end Garmin units. Ebay can be a good source. I would like to have a real costly one that is able to communicate with the wireless beacons like the Garmin Chirps, but I won't shell out the money for one of the paperless units. I use a Venture HC most of the time. I used a map and compass before they "flipped the switch". I still carry a compass in my pack. I've been a hiker longer than geocaching has been around, and my first unit was used for recording locations of old cemeterys, as I'm also into geneology. There are some mounds and Native American burial sites that I would never disclose the location of on the internet. One of my listings, "Indian Grave Gap" which is the name of the mountain pass was a burial site that was looted many years ago. There is a village site nearby that is listed on the National Registery of Historic places, and the location is restricted. It is near Dungannon, Va. Quite sure that a mound existed there once, but farming has destroyed it. I remember the farm once had a different color of soil in the center, and it was a great site for surface hunting relics. I have tryed to pass my hobby of relic collecting and surface hunting to my children, and my young 10 year old daughter has really taken to it. My wife calls us rock collectors, which is true.

Perhaps I have stated something incorrectly. I am 59 years, soon to be 60, and with a book, map and compass, ruller and pencil I can find anything I know about.

 

Having a used first time gps will open the door to what ever normal cache hunting is. Having someone like you will open another door to earth caching, or historical sites caching if there is such a thing. I agree not all should be opened to theft, burial raids, and over use of the few wild places left.

 

Places as you have allowed your children are ruined by farming, condo construction, parking lots, and other. Still in some ways these very items are a loss to the understanding and nature of the old ways, but your gains are yours, and I understand, as I have a smaller collection of plowed up items too.

 

Some things man does when he is ignorant, not stupid, just happen, as it can be hard to know what is buried a few inches down, when 250+ years have buried an artifact and then normal anything we do brings something to the surface.

 

I have been lucky to be able to work with the NH state geologist, and get to huntpaloe sites and cherts in Maine. We don't get to keep a thing, but atleast we can get a picture sometimes. I tend to not keep pictures of chards, which is about all that is found during these state digs.

 

I also do historical re-enacting, have spent years learning woodlands skills, and get in a lot of hiking (modern), and trecking (not so modern), and last miss the last of the truely wild places.

Sounds like you have about 15 years on me, but we are both old school from a time before GPS units. The batterys have never went out on my compass, but I have lost a map or two before. One of our local mounds may be excavated soon. The landowner has worked out some kind of deal with I forget who to do a dig at the site. All relics found will belong to the landowner. I saw this in local news papers two years ago. The mound is listed here as GC1KKPG and WM9KTA. I have a few caches and waymarks in the area. I hike the trails in Cumberland Gap National Historic Park along the ridges. We had some nice EC's in the area, but banned member Cav Scout made some mistakes and his 203 EC listings got archived. I have done some historic re-inactment also. It's a big to-do at Wilderness Road State Park where there is a reconstructed Fort to resemble Martin's Station. I have a geocache there on the subject. We also raid the Block House (GC1Q3HY) every year. You may be new to geocaching, but I think that we are the kind of folks that enjoy geocaching. One of my recent quests for new EC listings may not work out so well on this site, as it is a mound in a tourist area with motels and buildings all around. I don't think piled up dirt and asphalt would make a good earth science lesson, but the site will make a nice virtual listing and help educate geocachers about our culture and history.

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I am so new, that I have never even held a GPS in my hand yet, much less ever owned one. I am trying to get that sorted out, and not make some wild costly error in the doing.

 

Many EarthCaches as well as other type listings can be found without a GPS unit. I have used the driving directions from the cache page and google earth or some of my other maps to view the area. Urban caching is eazy this way, and with the new map layout on this site may be all you need. When you do get a GPS unit, look at some of the lower end Garmin units. Ebay can be a good source. I would like to have a real costly one that is able to communicate with the wireless beacons like the Garmin Chirps, but I won't shell out the money for one of the paperless units. I use a Venture HC most of the time. I used a map and compass before they "flipped the switch". I still carry a compass in my pack. I've been a hiker longer than geocaching has been around, and my first unit was used for recording locations of old cemeterys, as I'm also into geneology. There are some mounds and Native American burial sites that I would never disclose the location of on the internet. One of my listings, "Indian Grave Gap" which is the name of the mountain pass was a burial site that was looted many years ago. There is a village site nearby that is listed on the National Registery of Historic places, and the location is restricted. It is near Dungannon, Va. Quite sure that a mound existed there once, but farming has destroyed it. I remember the farm once had a different color of soil in the center, and it was a great site for surface hunting relics. I have tryed to pass my hobby of relic collecting and surface hunting to my children, and my young 10 year old daughter has really taken to it. My wife calls us rock collectors, which is true.

Perhaps I have stated something incorrectly. I am 59 years, soon to be 60, and with a book, map and compass, ruller and pencil I can find anything I know about.

 

Having a used first time gps will open the door to what ever normal cache hunting is. Having someone like you will open another door to earth caching, or historical sites caching if there is such a thing. I agree not all should be opened to theft, burial raids, and over use of the few wild places left.

 

Places as you have allowed your children are ruined by farming, condo construction, parking lots, and other. Still in some ways these very items are a loss to the understanding and nature of the old ways, but your gains are yours, and I understand, as I have a smaller collection of plowed up items too.

 

Some things man does when he is ignorant, not stupid, just happen, as it can be hard to know what is buried a few inches down, when 250+ years have buried an artifact and then normal anything we do brings something to the surface.

 

I have been lucky to be able to work with the NH state geologist, and get to huntpaloe sites and cherts in Maine. We don't get to keep a thing, but atleast we can get a picture sometimes. I tend to not keep pictures of chards, which is about all that is found during these state digs.

 

I also do historical re-enacting, have spent years learning woodlands skills, and get in a lot of hiking (modern), and trecking (not so modern), and last miss the last of the truely wild places.

Sounds like you have about 15 years on me, but we are both old school from a time before GPS units. The batterys have never went out on my compass, but I have lost a map or two before. One of our local mounds may be excavated soon. The landowner has worked out some kind of deal with I forget who to do a dig at the site. All relics found will belong to the landowner. I saw this in local news papers two years ago. The mound is listed here as GC1KKPG and WM9KTA. I have a few caches and waymarks in the area. I hike the trails in Cumberland Gap National Historic Park along the ridges. We had some nice EC's in the area, but banned member Cav Scout made some mistakes and his 203 EC listings got archived. I have done some historic re-inactment also. It's a big to-do at Wilderness Road State Park where there is a reconstructed Fort to resemble Martin's Station. I have a geocache there on the subject. We also raid the Block House (GC1Q3HY) every year. You may be new to geocaching, but I think that we are the kind of folks that enjoy geocaching. One of my recent quests for new EC listings may not work out so well on this site, as it is a mound in a tourist area with motels and buildings all around. I don't think piled up dirt and asphalt would make a good earth science lesson, but the site will make a nice virtual listing and help educate geocachers about our culture and history.

 

Small world. I was at the re-bulit park and wanted to play, but wasn't allowed, because they didn't know me and I wasn't on anyones team/side in 2006. There was some interest in my Trade Silver, and I went back for the Gun Makers Fair. I was at Bledso Park too for the south eastern, and got to play there though. Interesting weatha that was. Most of the camp was blown flat. I found some Tn flint there, enough to work for awhile, but it wasn't ment to be as it was stolen, with my motorcycle in W.Va headin to NH. I am still a bit miffed for that loss of tool stone.

 

I wish the mound you mention would be left alone, to tell the truth. I can see it maybe when it is for the history and lessons of the past for all, and a museum is created, open to the public. That helps me deal with the inherent problems of basic grave robbing. Surface finds are already ruined as I said in another post. So I don't have much problem there. I hope atleast what ever happens is documented well, and it isn't just a fancy high art sale in the end.

 

Of course I am no one, and what I think doesn't matter a bit.

 

I am wondering if I/we are off topic and if I/we will get busted. I'ld hate to get you or anyone else busted, and me with just a toe in the door.

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I am so new, that I have never even held a GPS in my hand yet, much less ever owned one. I am trying to get that sorted out, and not make some wild costly error in the doing.

 

Many EarthCaches as well as other type listings can be found without a GPS unit. I have used the driving directions from the cache page and google earth or some of my other maps to view the area. Urban caching is eazy this way, and with the new map layout on this site may be all you need. When you do get a GPS unit, look at some of the lower end Garmin units. Ebay can be a good source. I would like to have a real costly one that is able to communicate with the wireless beacons like the Garmin Chirps, but I won't shell out the money for one of the paperless units. I use a Venture HC most of the time. I used a map and compass before they "flipped the switch". I still carry a compass in my pack. I've been a hiker longer than geocaching has been around, and my first unit was used for recording locations of old cemeterys, as I'm also into geneology. There are some mounds and Native American burial sites that I would never disclose the location of on the internet. One of my listings, "Indian Grave Gap" which is the name of the mountain pass was a burial site that was looted many years ago. There is a village site nearby that is listed on the National Registery of Historic places, and the location is restricted. It is near Dungannon, Va. Quite sure that a mound existed there once, but farming has destroyed it. I remember the farm once had a different color of soil in the center, and it was a great site for surface hunting relics. I have tryed to pass my hobby of relic collecting and surface hunting to my children, and my young 10 year old daughter has really taken to it. My wife calls us rock collectors, which is true.

Perhaps I have stated something incorrectly. I am 59 years, soon to be 60, and with a book, map and compass, ruller and pencil I can find anything I know about.

 

Having a used first time gps will open the door to what ever normal cache hunting is. Having someone like you will open another door to earth caching, or historical sites caching if there is such a thing. I agree not all should be opened to theft, burial raids, and over use of the few wild places left.

 

Places as you have allowed your children are ruined by farming, condo construction, parking lots, and other. Still in some ways these very items are a loss to the understanding and nature of the old ways, but your gains are yours, and I understand, as I have a smaller collection of plowed up items too.

 

Some things man does when he is ignorant, not stupid, just happen, as it can be hard to know what is buried a few inches down, when 250+ years have buried an artifact and then normal anything we do brings something to the surface.

 

I have been lucky to be able to work with the NH state geologist, and get to huntpaloe sites and cherts in Maine. We don't get to keep a thing, but atleast we can get a picture sometimes. I tend to not keep pictures of chards, which is about all that is found during these state digs.

 

I also do historical re-enacting, have spent years learning woodlands skills, and get in a lot of hiking (modern), and trecking (not so modern), and last miss the last of the truely wild places.

Sounds like you have about 15 years on me, but we are both old school from a time before GPS units. The batterys have never went out on my compass, but I have lost a map or two before. One of our local mounds may be excavated soon. The landowner has worked out some kind of deal with I forget who to do a dig at the site. All relics found will belong to the landowner. I saw this in local news papers two years ago. The mound is listed here as GC1KKPG and WM9KTA. I have a few caches and waymarks in the area. I hike the trails in Cumberland Gap National Historic Park along the ridges. We had some nice EC's in the area, but banned member Cav Scout made some mistakes and his 203 EC listings got archived. I have done some historic re-inactment also. It's a big to-do at Wilderness Road State Park where there is a reconstructed Fort to resemble Martin's Station. I have a geocache there on the subject. We also raid the Block House (GC1Q3HY) every year. You may be new to geocaching, but I think that we are the kind of folks that enjoy geocaching. One of my recent quests for new EC listings may not work out so well on this site, as it is a mound in a tourist area with motels and buildings all around. I don't think piled up dirt and asphalt would make a good earth science lesson, but the site will make a nice virtual listing and help educate geocachers about our culture and history.

 

Small world. I was at the re-bulit park and wanted to play, but wasn't allowed, because they didn't know me and I wasn't on anyones team/side in 2006. There was some interest in my Trade Silver, and I went back for the Gun Makers Fair. I was at Bledso Park too for the south eastern, and got to play there though. Interesting weatha that was. Most of the camp was blown flat. I found some Tn flint there, enough to work for awhile, but it wasn't ment to be as it was stolen, with my motorcycle in W.Va headin to NH. I am still a bit miffed for that loss of tool stone.

 

I wish the mound you mention would be left alone, to tell the truth. I can see it maybe when it is for the history and lessons of the past for all, and a museum is created, open to the public. That helps me deal with the inherent problems of basic grave robbing. Surface finds are already ruined as I said in another post. So I don't have much problem there. I hope atleast what ever happens is documented well, and it isn't just a fancy high art sale in the end.

 

Of course I am no one, and what I think doesn't matter a bit.

 

I am wondering if I/we are off topic and if I/we will get busted. I'ld hate to get you or anyone else busted, and me with just a toe in the door.

I think that we are still on topic, somewhat anyway. One of the Rangers at WRSP is a heck of a gun maker. Did you see the Native Americian relics on display in the visitors center? Most of it is from that area near the mound, donated by locals. I have knapped flint some, but it has been some time. I see some great work at a flea market in Jonesboro, Tennessee made by a man in that area. Some of the best points that I have ever seen in my time. I just aquired a nice block of Catlinite a few weeks ago for some carving this winter. I normally work with native grey sandstone from the Oconoluftee River. Mounds may be in a "grey area" as far as EarthCaches go, and I don't know much about geology as it is taught in school. I have been taught respect for the Earth, and things that it provides for us. One of the mounds that myself and others visit is slowly being rebuilt. When we visit we bring a handfull of dirt from our home and add it to the center of the mound. That is the only bare spot on the mound, and the soil is red now in that spot. It is the dust of our ancestors, and the color of their skin.

Share this post


Link to post
I am so new, that I have never even held a GPS in my hand yet, much less ever owned one. I am trying to get that sorted out, and not make some wild costly error in the doing.

 

Many EarthCaches as well as other type listings can be found without a GPS unit. I have used the driving directions from the cache page and google earth or some of my other maps to view the area. Urban caching is eazy this way, and with the new map layout on this site may be all you need. When you do get a GPS unit, look at some of the lower end Garmin units. Ebay can be a good source. I would like to have a real costly one that is able to communicate with the wireless beacons like the Garmin Chirps, but I won't shell out the money for one of the paperless units. I use a Venture HC most of the time. I used a map and compass before they "flipped the switch". I still carry a compass in my pack. I've been a hiker longer than geocaching has been around, and my first unit was used for recording locations of old cemeterys, as I'm also into geneology. There are some mounds and Native American burial sites that I would never disclose the location of on the internet. One of my listings, "Indian Grave Gap" which is the name of the mountain pass was a burial site that was looted many years ago. There is a village site nearby that is listed on the National Registery of Historic places, and the location is restricted. It is near Dungannon, Va. Quite sure that a mound existed there once, but farming has destroyed it. I remember the farm once had a different color of soil in the center, and it was a great site for surface hunting relics. I have tryed to pass my hobby of relic collecting and surface hunting to my children, and my young 10 year old daughter has really taken to it. My wife calls us rock collectors, which is true.

Perhaps I have stated something incorrectly. I am 59 years, soon to be 60, and with a book, map and compass, ruller and pencil I can find anything I know about.

 

Having a used first time gps will open the door to what ever normal cache hunting is. Having someone like you will open another door to earth caching, or historical sites caching if there is such a thing. I agree not all should be opened to theft, burial raids, and over use of the few wild places left.

 

Places as you have allowed your children are ruined by farming, condo construction, parking lots, and other. Still in some ways these very items are a loss to the understanding and nature of the old ways, but your gains are yours, and I understand, as I have a smaller collection of plowed up items too.

 

Some things man does when he is ignorant, not stupid, just happen, as it can be hard to know what is buried a few inches down, when 250+ years have buried an artifact and then normal anything we do brings something to the surface.

 

I have been lucky to be able to work with the NH state geologist, and get to huntpaloe sites and cherts in Maine. We don't get to keep a thing, but atleast we can get a picture sometimes. I tend to not keep pictures of chards, which is about all that is found during these state digs.

 

I also do historical re-enacting, have spent years learning woodlands skills, and get in a lot of hiking (modern), and trecking (not so modern), and last miss the last of the truely wild places.

Sounds like you have about 15 years on me, but we are both old school from a time before GPS units. The batterys have never went out on my compass, but I have lost a map or two before. One of our local mounds may be excavated soon. The landowner has worked out some kind of deal with I forget who to do a dig at the site. All relics found will belong to the landowner. I saw this in local news papers two years ago. The mound is listed here as GC1KKPG and WM9KTA. I have a few caches and waymarks in the area. I hike the trails in Cumberland Gap National Historic Park along the ridges. We had some nice EC's in the area, but banned member Cav Scout made some mistakes and his 203 EC listings got archived. I have done some historic re-inactment also. It's a big to-do at Wilderness Road State Park where there is a reconstructed Fort to resemble Martin's Station. I have a geocache there on the subject. We also raid the Block House (GC1Q3HY) every year. You may be new to geocaching, but I think that we are the kind of folks that enjoy geocaching. One of my recent quests for new EC listings may not work out so well on this site, as it is a mound in a tourist area with motels and buildings all around. I don't think piled up dirt and asphalt would make a good earth science lesson, but the site will make a nice virtual listing and help educate geocachers about our culture and history.

 

Small world. I was at the re-bulit park and wanted to play, but wasn't allowed, because they didn't know me and I wasn't on anyones team/side in 2006. There was some interest in my Trade Silver, and I went back for the Gun Makers Fair. I was at Bledso Park too for the south eastern, and got to play there though. Interesting weatha that was. Most of the camp was blown flat. I found some Tn flint there, enough to work for awhile, but it wasn't ment to be as it was stolen, with my motorcycle in W.Va headin to NH. I am still a bit miffed for that loss of tool stone.

 

I wish the mound you mention would be left alone, to tell the truth. I can see it maybe when it is for the history and lessons of the past for all, and a museum is created, open to the public. That helps me deal with the inherent problems of basic grave robbing. Surface finds are already ruined as I said in another post. So I don't have much problem there. I hope atleast what ever happens is documented well, and it isn't just a fancy high art sale in the end.

 

Of course I am no one, and what I think doesn't matter a bit.

 

I am wondering if I/we are off topic and if I/we will get busted. I'ld hate to get you or anyone else busted, and me with just a toe in the door.

I think that we are still on topic, somewhat anyway. One of the Rangers at WRSP is a heck of a gun maker. Did you see the Native Americian relics on display in the visitors center? Most of it is from that area near the mound, donated by locals. I have knapped flint some, but it has been some time. I see some great work at a flea market in Jonesboro, Tennessee made by a man in that area. Some of the best points that I have ever seen in my time. I just aquired a nice block of Catlinite a few weeks ago for some carving this winter. I normally work with native grey sandstone from the Oconoluftee River. Mounds may be in a "grey area" as far as EarthCaches go, and I don't know much about geology as it is taught in school. I have been taught respect for the Earth, and things that it provides for us. One of the mounds that myself and others visit is slowly being rebuilt. When we visit we bring a handfull of dirt from our home and add it to the center of the mound. That is the only bare spot on the mound, and the soil is red now in that spot. It is the dust of our ancestors, and the color of their skin.

Yes, as I recall there was a smaller musum like display and a retail store. I bought a brass compass there (India likey) but it has a screw on threaded top, and the top can screw on the bottom, for less chance of loss. Supposed to be circa 1750 sytled.

 

My flint knapping is not of jewelery quality, most of it is for cheaper gun flints. They are right thru the roof these days like anything else. I can and do make other tools, but these are tools not jewelery.

 

The time of year was early to late Spring and the heat and muggies drove us out.

 

Before i do get you in a mods problem, would you mind pointing me to the What's a Earth Cache page. On sites like this, most often there is pages sort of hidden, and it takes me months to find them. About that time I end up feeling like the worlds biggest fool. That's ok, as my wife tells me this is true anyway.... But I don't want to take anyone else down with me.

 

I am not studied in geology either, but many parts are more than fasinating to me. The quest of where we come from sort of thing.

 

NH is called the Granite State, but oddly isn't made up mostly of granite at all. There is a semi related mineral types called shist, which is a lead silver color, and makes up most of the larger mountins here, and shines in sunlight like silver. This is all bent and warped, very aged rock, with no trace of shells.

many myths have been created over this rock type, glowing at distances seen from sea.

 

This isn't to say there is no grainite here as there is and in red and gray, with assorted other colorings, and the green is a bit unusual when you can see it cut and polished.

 

(Once coming back from Yarmouth Cdn to Portland Maine before i could see land, i could see 'my mountains' floating in mid-air, a mirage at nearing sun set. That is one of my top 10 ever sights)

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I am so new, that I have never even held a GPS in my hand yet, much less ever owned one. I am trying to get that sorted out, and not make some wild costly error in the doing.

 

Many EarthCaches as well as other type listings can be found without a GPS unit. I have used the driving directions from the cache page and google earth or some of my other maps to view the area. Urban caching is eazy this way, and with the new map layout on this site may be all you need. When you do get a GPS unit, look at some of the lower end Garmin units. Ebay can be a good source. I would like to have a real costly one that is able to communicate with the wireless beacons like the Garmin Chirps, but I won't shell out the money for one of the paperless units. I use a Venture HC most of the time. I used a map and compass before they "flipped the switch". I still carry a compass in my pack. I've been a hiker longer than geocaching has been around, and my first unit was used for recording locations of old cemeterys, as I'm also into geneology. There are some mounds and Native American burial sites that I would never disclose the location of on the internet. One of my listings, "Indian Grave Gap" which is the name of the mountain pass was a burial site that was looted many years ago. There is a village site nearby that is listed on the National Registery of Historic places, and the location is restricted. It is near Dungannon, Va. Quite sure that a mound existed there once, but farming has destroyed it. I remember the farm once had a different color of soil in the center, and it was a great site for surface hunting relics. I have tryed to pass my hobby of relic collecting and surface hunting to my children, and my young 10 year old daughter has really taken to it. My wife calls us rock collectors, which is true.

Perhaps I have stated something incorrectly. I am 59 years, soon to be 60, and with a book, map and compass, ruller and pencil I can find anything I know about.

 

Having a used first time gps will open the door to what ever normal cache hunting is. Having someone like you will open another door to earth caching, or historical sites caching if there is such a thing. I agree not all should be opened to theft, burial raids, and over use of the few wild places left.

 

Places as you have allowed your children are ruined by farming, condo construction, parking lots, and other. Still in some ways these very items are a loss to the understanding and nature of the old ways, but your gains are yours, and I understand, as I have a smaller collection of plowed up items too.

 

Some things man does when he is ignorant, not stupid, just happen, as it can be hard to know what is buried a few inches down, when 250+ years have buried an artifact and then normal anything we do brings something to the surface.

 

I have been lucky to be able to work with the NH state geologist, and get to huntpaloe sites and cherts in Maine. We don't get to keep a thing, but atleast we can get a picture sometimes. I tend to not keep pictures of chards, which is about all that is found during these state digs.

 

I also do historical re-enacting, have spent years learning woodlands skills, and get in a lot of hiking (modern), and trecking (not so modern), and last miss the last of the truely wild places.

Sounds like you have about 15 years on me, but we are both old school from a time before GPS units. The batterys have never went out on my compass, but I have lost a map or two before. One of our local mounds may be excavated soon. The landowner has worked out some kind of deal with I forget who to do a dig at the site. All relics found will belong to the landowner. I saw this in local news papers two years ago. The mound is listed here as GC1KKPG and WM9KTA. I have a few caches and waymarks in the area. I hike the trails in Cumberland Gap National Historic Park along the ridges. We had some nice EC's in the area, but banned member Cav Scout made some mistakes and his 203 EC listings got archived. I have done some historic re-inactment also. It's a big to-do at Wilderness Road State Park where there is a reconstructed Fort to resemble Martin's Station. I have a geocache there on the subject. We also raid the Block House (GC1Q3HY) every year. You may be new to geocaching, but I think that we are the kind of folks that enjoy geocaching. One of my recent quests for new EC listings may not work out so well on this site, as it is a mound in a tourist area with motels and buildings all around. I don't think piled up dirt and asphalt would make a good earth science lesson, but the site will make a nice virtual listing and help educate geocachers about our culture and history.

 

Small world. I was at the re-bulit park and wanted to play, but wasn't allowed, because they didn't know me and I wasn't on anyones team/side in 2006. There was some interest in my Trade Silver, and I went back for the Gun Makers Fair. I was at Bledso Park too for the south eastern, and got to play there though. Interesting weatha that was. Most of the camp was blown flat. I found some Tn flint there, enough to work for awhile, but it wasn't ment to be as it was stolen, with my motorcycle in W.Va headin to NH. I am still a bit miffed for that loss of tool stone.

 

I wish the mound you mention would be left alone, to tell the truth. I can see it maybe when it is for the history and lessons of the past for all, and a museum is created, open to the public. That helps me deal with the inherent problems of basic grave robbing. Surface finds are already ruined as I said in another post. So I don't have much problem there. I hope atleast what ever happens is documented well, and it isn't just a fancy high art sale in the end.

 

Of course I am no one, and what I think doesn't matter a bit.

 

I am wondering if I/we are off topic and if I/we will get busted. I'ld hate to get you or anyone else busted, and me with just a toe in the door.

I think that we are still on topic, somewhat anyway. One of the Rangers at WRSP is a heck of a gun maker. Did you see the Native Americian relics on display in the visitors center? Most of it is from that area near the mound, donated by locals. I have knapped flint some, but it has been some time. I see some great work at a flea market in Jonesboro, Tennessee made by a man in that area. Some of the best points that I have ever seen in my time. I just aquired a nice block of Catlinite a few weeks ago for some carving this winter. I normally work with native grey sandstone from the Oconoluftee River. Mounds may be in a "grey area" as far as EarthCaches go, and I don't know much about geology as it is taught in school. I have been taught respect for the Earth, and things that it provides for us. One of the mounds that myself and others visit is slowly being rebuilt. When we visit we bring a handfull of dirt from our home and add it to the center of the mound. That is the only bare spot on the mound, and the soil is red now in that spot. It is the dust of our ancestors, and the color of their skin.

Yes, as I recall there was a smaller musum like display and a retail store. I bought a brass compass there (India likey) but it has a screw on threaded top, and the top can screw on the bottom, for less chance of loss. Supposed to be circa 1750 sytled.

 

My flint knapping is not of jewelery quality, most of it is for cheaper gun flints. They are right thru the roof these days like anything else. I can and do make other tools, but these are tools not jewelery.

 

The time of year was early to late Spring and the heat and muggies drove us out.

 

Before i do get you in a mods problem, would you mind pointing me to the What's a Earth Cache page. On sites like this, most often there is pages sort of hidden, and it takes me months to find them. About that time I end up feeling like the worlds biggest fool. That's ok, as my wife tells me this is true anyway.... But I don't want to take anyone else down with me.

 

I am not studied in geology either, but many parts are more than fasinating to me. The quest of where we come from sort of thing.

 

NH is called the Granite State, but oddly isn't made up mostly of granite at all. There is a semi related mineral types called shist, which is a lead silver color, and makes up most of the larger mountins here, and shines in sunlight like silver. This is all bent and warped, very aged rock, with no trace of shells.

many myths have been created over this rock type, glowing at distances seen from sea.

 

This isn't to say there is no grainite here as there is and in red and gray, with assorted other colorings, and the green is a bit unusual when you can see it cut and polished.

 

(Once coming back from Yarmouth Cdn to Portland Maine before i could see land, i could see 'my mountains' floating in mid-air, a mirage at nearing sun set. That is one of my top 10 ever sights)

We won't get in any trouble here in the EC forums as long as we try and stay somewhat on topic. I hope that others read our conversation about our love for a culture that used stone tools. One of my favorite pieces on display at the Park visitors center is the round ball morter and pedistal. Is it granite with a white streak of quartz? It is so small, wonder what they crushed with it? I think it was used to make war paint. Just like the little things called woodland cones made from hemitite/iron ore that we find here. Some look like a musket mini-ball, others like a hay stack. It took alot of time to make, but what were the used for? I have half of a broken doughnut stone that was a surface find, we know that it was a stone tool used with a "bow" and stick to make fire. One of my cones has a base that has been "pecked" out, but no other wear in the base. Was it a idea similar to the doughnut stone?

We are at a disadvantage with computers because of our age. My teenage son is a big help, he also likes geocaching, but only seems interested in EarthCaches mostly. I use earthcache.org to link to the site, but I'm sure there are other ways. Something seems missing, I had problems linking to the site from here today?

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The blog like conversation seemed long.

 

Natural like wise around here is rarer, and while I don't know, I suspect Button Mold Bay on Lk Champlain must have a geocache location.

 

The type of sedimentary rock there is a sand/mud base, and grasses that grow with wet feet, pop right up, cutting the stone, and it creates 'Buttons'.

 

These are too brittle to use on a garment, but study enough to sew to something not used every day. The problem is each button has one hole, and those that have more are irregular and have holes that don't line up. Never the less I find them interestng.

 

Where I am in NH occasionally you can find a smaller than palm sized rock with a depression cut by nature that makes a god top bearing for a bow drill spindle.

 

I suspect you know what that is. If not feel free to ask. And yes I can and do start fire with a bow drill in 120 seconds every time, so long as I use my own tools. Wish other Native relics lasted so well as stone does.

 

Oh, I have a rock I found near by here, up in the O ssip ee /Awe sip EE (Modern Ossipee's) that for a ong time I thought was a grinding mortar, but not in a bowel shape. This more of a rectangle, and it may be natural, or it may be made by the hand of man, I really can't tell.

 

There is a grooved cut all the way around, and at this time I think it is a boat anchor, that was wrapped on a line, as was done in ancient times, whether or not it was made by man. The base rock is Basalt. The problem with this is I found it pretty far from any larger bodies of water, while it was closer to a few small ponds, and it was above 1000 feet above sea level. Still there are larger lakes in the area, and at about 15/20 miles as the crow flies is the Weirs at Weirs Beach NH. I may never know the answers on this rock.

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Oh, I have a rock I found near by here, up in the O ssip ee /Awe sip EE (Modern Ossipee's) that for a ong time I thought was a grinding mortar, but not in a bowel shape. This more of a rectangle, and it may be natural, or it may be made by the hand of man, I really can't tell.

 

I have a nice grinding mortar that I found in Harlen County , Kentucky near the Clover Fork of the Cumberland River that has a depression on both sides. It is made from hard sandstone, and quite large. I have found alot of fossils there in Black Mountain. We ride in an ATV Park there that is located in some old reclaimed strip mining property. I have some geocaches there, one is yet to be found and has been in place a couple of years. I have seen other fossils like the ones that I have found, seems they were the root of a type of Palm tree, and some were the fruit/nuts. The root fossil looks like a cactus without needles. I have found others like them in different strip mine areas. I don't agree with mountain top removel, but Coal is big money in our area, and a subject best avoided.

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That palm tree like fossil is a carbon plant. A smaller section was given to me by a local I met out riding between London/Loodon and Somersot. Marker is on my map, and I can't make out if it says London or Looden. I no longer have the fossil, as it was stolen in one of the two boxes in the way of my motorcycle which was stolen too. Everything in the way of the bike was stolen in W.Va.

 

Make a long story short My wife and I rode a mc from NH to Cal pulling a small mc trailer behind the bike. From Cal to Fla, from there back to Oklahoma, and back east again into Arknsas, where we hit winter, and so bought a full size 86' Dodge conversion van and a larger 6x6x12 enclosed trailer to winter in. We kept that, and still have it. But the bike is gone along with 2 boxes of rocks, which contained that carbon plant fossil, 1 deer skull with antlers on, alot of assorted rocks, and all my hard found Tn flint. Another box of camping gear, some of it fit for re-enactment, and a back pack will all my wifes clothing she didn't have on at the time of the theft.

 

Luckily I had a few other rocks and fossils in the van, I had gathered along the way. A most cherished one found in West Point Ne, is a small section of 11 million year old live oak.

I was walking a reclaimed river bank, grav el pit turned to be a pond off the Elk River, and saw what I first took to be porky pine antler chew, as the bark side was up and had turned white with silica invasion. Once I picked it up the other side was amber color and I had no idea what it was other than a rock.

 

I asked a few locals and they told me it was "Lightning" meaning or as explained to me lightning hit the sand and melted the sand to be what I found. I accpeted that for ignorance, but wasn't convinced. A little while later I was at a place called Ash Fall, and talking with the head geologist, who saw the rock, claimed 'what a nice specimen', and then pointed to a whole stump of the stuff. <_<

 

Fossils are a big deal to me as NH has very few of them.

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Fossils are a big deal to me as NH has very few of them.

 

We have quite a few fossils, most seem to be sea fossils. I find some real nice small sea shell type fossils. I know that the are a cast type, and most are found in layers of slate, but some are in clumps in large rocks. Another one looks like a threaded bolt without a head. Also I find some about the soze of a kids fist that look like lizzard skin on top with a strange circle on the bottom. I have a nice one that is about the size of a cookie. Another strange one looks sort of like an acorn? All sea critters I guess? I have seen some nice ferns in Coal found by local miners.

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I would like to see pictures, but I probably can't ID what you have. Maybe you have pics on photobucket now?

I need a photobucket account so I can quit using this site to store my photos in. I really do need to create an account there, I have alot of nice EarthCache photos. I listed a video of the kids sliding down the channle of my son's new EC listing on Youtube. We planned a hike today in the area to the Devil's bathtub EC, but got rained out eariler. We go there to swim on hot days, the tree canopy keeps the hike a little cooler.

 

Edit to add link.

Edited by Manville Possum Hunters

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I got real busy, sorry. I also am on 56 k dial up :ph34r: I got to see the stone slide video, which we have here in many places, much like that. I got to see a little girl walk on dino foot prints :D

 

I also found to buy, a GPSmap 60SCx, but best of all, my son is home in NH from the sand, and I might get to see him sometime tomorrow!~

 

On Edit: Suddenly I just realized i am buying the wrong GPS! I need the kind with a dawg collar! So I can track my son! :lol:

Edited by Lodge Pole

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