Jump to content

night caches & proximity rules


JL_HSTRE
Followers 1

Recommended Posts

Reviewers won't ask for the coordinates to the firetacks - only for the locations of cache containers - when testing for Cache Saturation. We do ask that you not set up your firetack trail in a manner that interferes with any existing night caches.

 

Be sure that something in your cache design meets the test for GPS usage, which is required for every cache. If I can shine my flashlight from a paved parking lot and see the first firetack, I never need to take my GPS out of the car. That design is also more likely to lead to a muggled cache container. They let muggles have flashlights, too.

Link to comment

Be sure that something in your cache design meets the test for GPS usage, which is required for every cache. If I can shine my flashlight from a paved parking lot and see the first firetack, I never need to take my GPS out of the car.

 

So how does that differ from a drive-by trad cache?

Is the fact that you'll need your GPS to get to the parking lot enough?

Link to comment

They let muggles have flashlights, too.

I hate to play the devil's advocate... However...

 

Many muggles convert to geocaching after finding one on accident, most sign their name in the log and find the whole thing interesting. Very few steal the container.

 

If a muggle has enough interest to follow a series of fire tacks to see where it leads, and looks around the area of the final fire tack after a 20 - 30 minute journey to find a container they didn't even know was there...

 

I seriously doubt the same person would be one of the very few muggles who would muggle the container. Rather, this person must love adventure, and go out of his way to do it, even if there is no tangible reward (He had no idea where it would lead, and that there would be a cache). This is the kind of person who would convert to geocaching.

Link to comment

I don't think it can be assumed that a GPS is "required" to find any cache. Every cache needs to offer the opportunity to use a GPS, but I've never found a cache that "required" the use of a GPS.

Thanks for the thread bump. Note, however, that I did not say that GPS is required, but rather that the "test for GPS usage" is a required element for every cache. That test says that the OPTION of using GPS coordinates must be incorporated into every cache design, somewhere along the way.

Link to comment

They let muggles have flashlights, too.

I hate to play the devil's advocate... However...

 

Many muggles convert to geocaching after finding one on accident, most sign their name in the log and find the whole thing interesting. Very few steal the container.

My experience differs, both as a player and as a cache reviewer. As a player I've lost three cache containers, or at least their contents, to hunters. One was seven miles from the nearest paved road and had about $100 worth of high-value swag items to reward finders after the long hike. One would think that hunters would have the sense of adventure you describe. Some do, some don't.

 

As a cache reviewer I am called upon to review many muggled listings where the owner hasn't complied with the "Cache Maintenance" guideline. Among these over the years have been numerous night caches where comments in the logs say "easy find even in daylight" or "spotted the first firetack when the car headlights reflected off it as we entered the parking lot." Draw your own conclusions.

Link to comment

Totally agreeing with Keystone on the issue of night cache survival. Probably the most difficult cache to set up well.

 

And, local to me, the quickest to go missing.

The few I'm aware of that have lasted have involve long tough bushwhacks and the fire tacks do not go to the cache (Clan Riffster's night caches).

 

One urban design where no fire tacks were used, instead the cache design relied on lighted commercial signs, this lasted without issue. It finally went down when one of the signs went down and the cache owner decided not to redesign.

Edited by Isonzo Karst
Link to comment

ZOMBIE THREAD!

 

If a muggle has enough interest to follow a series of fire tacks to see where it leads, and looks around the area of the final fire tack after a 20 - 30 minute journey to find a container they didn't even know was there...

 

What about the ones that are alot less than 20-30 minutes to complete?

 

As a player I've lost three cache containers, or at least their contents, to hunters. One was seven miles from the nearest paved road and had about $100 worth of high-value swag items to reward finders after the long hike. One would think that hunters would have the sense of adventure you describe. Some do, some don't.

 

Having been to the ONF, I've definitely seen first hand that "miles from pavement" doesn't mean jack for "respect for the environment" like I'd think it would. And if you'll trash the place you sure as hell aren't going to respect someone's property you find there. :angry:

Edited by Joshism
Link to comment

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
Followers 1
×
×
  • Create New...