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Canadian Geopub Quiz

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I doubt this is right but i'm going to say that 100 Palladium Drive is where the largest amount of Palladium(the mineral) has been mined.

 

CLose enough, we need to move on

 

Palladium is mined nearby but not exactly at the address,,,

 

Your turn t_mac02

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I doubt this is right but i'm going to say that 100 Palladium Drive is where the largest amount of Palladium(the mineral) has been mined.

 

CLose enough, we need to move on

 

Palladium is mined nearby but not exactly at the address,,,

 

Your turn t_mac02

 

Can you elaborate on this little known fact? I studied geology at the U of O and I had no clue of this happening. You would think mining of such a rare and valuable mineral would be well known locally.

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I doubt this is right but i'm going to say that 100 Palladium Drive is where the largest amount of Palladium(the mineral) has been mined.

 

CLose enough, we need to move on

 

Palladium is mined nearby but not exactly at the address,,,

 

Your turn t_mac02

 

Can you elaborate on this little known fact? I studied geology at the U of O and I had no clue of this happening. You would think mining of such a rare and valuable mineral would be well known locally.

 

Hmm now do you think I could remember where i found that?? I will look at my internet history to see if I could find it,, it was something to do with place names and geology,,

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I am so sorry everyone :D

I forgot that I had answered a question on this thread. I did not mean to not come back but then I became really busy with work and other things in life and just never got back here!

Please forgive me! :sad:

I am glad that you went on without me. But thanks for trying to wait for me! My apologies again!!!!

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OK, for the sake of keeping the game going, I will take the next question.

 

Name the tallest peak in the Canadian Rockies, its height (in metres please), the province it is in and the road which you can see it from.

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Mount Robson, In BC and can be seen from the highway that takes you from Jasper to Tete Jaune Cache. Traveled many time but no idea of the number. Mount Robson is not really in the Rockie's, It is part of The Rainbow range. For height, Tallest one for sure! :laughing:

 

Lorne

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Mount Robson, In BC and can be seen from the highway that takes you from Jasper to Tete Jaune Cache. Traveled many time but no idea of the number. Mount Robson is not really in the Rockie's, It is part of The Rainbow range. For height, Tallest one for sure! :laughing:

 

Lorne

 

I thought Mount Logan was the tallest mountain in Canada. But it's in the Yukon, which is a Territory, not a Province. And I have no idea what highway you would see it from.

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I thought Mount Logan was the tallest mountain in Canada. But it's in the Yukon, which is a Territory, not a Province. And I have no idea what highway you would see it from.

 

Logan is in the Mackenzie mountains, not the Rockies

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I thought Mount Logan was the tallest mountain in Canada. But it's in the Yukon, which is a Territory, not a Province. And I have no idea what highway you would see it from.

 

Logan is in the Mackenzie mountains, not the Rockies

 

Missed the bit about the 'Rockies' in the original question. oops! :laughing:

 

Adamsloco

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Mount Robson, In BC and can be seen from the highway that takes you from Jasper to Tete Jaune Cache.

Yep, right answers. To clarify, the highway is the Yellowhead (Hwy 16)

 

Mount Robson is not really in the Rockie's, It is part of The Rainbow range. For height, Tallest one for sure! :laughing:

According to the Geological Survey of Canada's 'Physigraphic Map of the Canadian Cordillera' as well as Ben Gadd's 'Handbook of the Canadian Rockies', the Canadian Rockies comprise all ranges east of the Rocky Mountain Trench. As for the range, I believe Mount Robson is located in the Selwyn Range of the BC Rockies. The Rainbow Range is found in the Coast Mountains north of Bella Coola

 

Anyone want to take a stab at its height in metres?

Edited by shearzone

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Mount Robson

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

 

Mount Robson

 

Mount Robson, August 2005

 

Location British Columbia, Canada

Range Rainbow Range (Canadian Rockies)

Prominence

Coordinates [show location on an interactive map] 53°06′37″N 119°09′24″W / 53.11028°N 119.15667°W / 53.11028; -119.15667Coordinates: [show location on an interactive map] 53°06′37″N 119°09′24″W / 53.11028°N 119.15667°W / 53.11028; -119.15667[4]

Topo map NTS 83E/03

First ascent July 31, 1913 by William W. Foster, Albert H. McCarthy and Conrad Kain[4][2]

Easiest route South face (UIAA IV)

Listing List of Ultras in Canada

 

Mount Robson is the most prominent mountain in North America's Rocky Mountain range; it is also the highest point in the Canadian Rockies. The mountain is located entirely within Mount Robson Provincial Park of British Columbia, and is part of the Rainbow Range. It is commonly thought to be the highest point in B.C., but that distinction is held by Mount Fairweather at 4,663 m (15,299 ft). Mount Robson is the second highest peak entirely in British Columbia, behind Mount Waddington.

 

I agree too , Maybe the Wikipedia is mistaken :anitongue:

I was always under the impression the Rainbow range was out Bella Coola Area too.

 

Mount Waddington

 

Not sure what to say??

 

Lorne

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Did a little more researching here and found this ;

 

Rainbow Range

Location: A compact range located 15 km north of the Bella Coola highway in Tweedsmuir Park. Not to be confused with the other Rainbow Range in the Rockies, which is the Robson massif.

 

Mystery solved I believe.

 

Hope this clears up the confusion, Learned some thing new today too. :-)

 

Lorne

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Did a little more researching here and found this ;

 

Rainbow Range

Location: A compact range located 15 km north of the Bella Coola highway in Tweedsmuir Park. Not to be confused with the other Rainbow Range in the Rockies, which is the Robson massif.

 

Mystery solved I believe.

 

Hope this clears up the confusion, Learned some thing new today too. :-)

 

Lorne

OK, thanks for the additional info! I was not aware that there were two ranges in the Canadian Cordillera by the name of Rainbow! I was mistaken about the Selwyn Range. Here are a couple of maps from Bivouac.com - Canadian Mountain Encyclopedia to clear things up:

 

Rainbow Range of the Canadian Rockies

Arx_1613.gif

as you can see, Mt Robson is well within the Rainbow Range

 

Selwyn Range

Arx_1015.gif

 

I was not aware that the Selwyn Range stops at the Fraser River and the Yellowhead Highway. Since you got three out of four and taught me something in the process, I'm handing the next question over to you. For interest sake, the elevation of Mt Robson's Peak is 3954 m.

Edited by shearzone

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Why does the Prime Meridian go through Greenwich, England?

Not really Canadian but they do run through our great country too.

 

Lorne

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Why does the Prime Meridian go through Greenwich, England?

Not really Canadian but they do run through our great country too.

 

Lorne

 

Agreed by convention that it would be there, I was uesd for centuries by navigators to begin thier voyages/

 

just something that I remember for survey courses in the UK

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close enough,

 

Why does the Prime Meridian go through Greenwich, England? It could be anywhere, but in the mid-1800s the Royal Observatory in Greenwich, England was well known for keeping time, and because the time is the same all along that line of longitude, it was decided that the Prime Meridian would go through Greenwich.

 

Your turn

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Let's not forget that the British Navy was the prime mover behind the research and development of accurate timepieces and creator of maps and navigational instruments. Given the reach of their influence, their maps and thus their references spread worldwide... sort of the Microsoft of their day. :lol:

 

Doug

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close enough,

 

Why does the Prime Meridian go through Greenwich, England? It could be anywhere, but in the mid-1800s the Royal Observatory in Greenwich, England was well known for keeping time, and because the time is the same all along that line of longitude, it was decided that the Prime Meridian would go through Greenwich.

 

Your turn

 

I will pass the orb of curiosity over to the any one who can answer this Question"

 

what is the name of the next person to post a question?

 

Of course it is in two parts so make sure you can post the second part

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I will pass the orb of curiosity over to the any one who can answer this Question"

 

what is the name of the next person to post a question?

 

Of course it is in two parts so make sure you can post the second part

 

Shearzone accepts the orb for the next question:

 

What is the name of the northernmost all-weather road in Canada and what is the name of the community at the northern end of it? Bonus points if you can claim to have driven along it!

Edited by shearzone

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The last question doesn't appear to be drawing any interest. I'll intercept with a new one to keep things moving. :P

 

Q: What famous Canadian wrote "Exhaustion and Fulfilment: The Ascetic in a Canoe" in 1944?

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The last question doesn't appear to be drawing any interest. I'll intercept with a new one to keep things moving. :laughing:

 

I am astounded that none of the astute minds perusing this quiz know the answer to this question. Perhaps it is because very few of us actually look at this part of the map of Canada. The answer is the Dempster Highway and the community at the end of the road is none other than the largest settlement of the Inuvialuit Settlement Region, Inuvik. I aspire to drive the Dempster Highway this summer.

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The last question doesn't appear to be drawing any interest. I'll intercept with a new one to keep things moving. :laughing:

 

I am astounded that none of the astute minds perusing this quiz know the answer to this question. Perhaps it is because very few of us actually look at this part of the map of Canada. The answer is the Dempster Highway and the community at the end of the road is none other than the largest settlement of the Inuvialuit Settlement Region, Inuvik. I aspire to drive the Dempster Highway this summer.

 

 

the Right Hon Trudeau

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The Canadaian Aboriginal Festival, and I do believe it's in Hamilton this year

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The Canadaian Aboriginal Festival, and I do believe it's in Hamilton this year

 

AWESOME! you are correct...it is a great festival and its first year in Hamilton it has been named Skydome Pow Wow as it was held there for about 15 years

 

the floor is yours

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A quick question for this round.... WAAS is comprised of 3 main segments- the Ground segment, the Space segment, and the User segment. The Ground Segment is composed of multiple Wide-area Reference Stations (WRS)....

 

The question is... how many WRS's are there?

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A quick question for this round.... WAAS is comprised of 3 main segments- the Ground segment, the Space segment, and the User segment. The Ground Segment is composed of multiple Wide-area Reference Stations (WRS)....

 

The question is... how many WRS's are there?

 

three?

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A quick question for this round.... WAAS is comprised of 3 main segments- the Ground segment, the Space segment, and the User segment. The Ground Segment is composed of multiple Wide-area Reference Stations (WRS)....

 

When did it change to WAAS?

I always taught that NAVSTAR has 3 segments Ground, Space and User

Edited by stagunner

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I thought Mount Logan was the tallest mountain in Canada. But it's in the Yukon, which is a Territory, not a Province. And I have no idea what highway you would see it from.

 

Logan is in the Mackenzie mountains, not the Rockies

 

No, Mt. Logan is in the St. Elias range of the Coast Mountains

 

I've seen it and Mt. Fairweather from the Kaskawulsh glacier in Kluane N.P. I'm not sure if it can be seen from the Alaska Highway.

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38

 

That's it....http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/WAAS#Ground_Segment

 

Take it Shracknel

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The GPS system is subject to 6 types of errors. What are they?

 

Rocks, canoe spill-overs, dead batteries, flush-happy babies, wolverines, and human ignorance :P

(yes i realize the question is not about receivers)

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The GPS system is subject to 6 types of errors. What are they?

Multi path

Ionospheric

individual receiver

Troposheric

Ephemeris

Atomic clock

 

based on numerous lessons taught a fews years ago

 

My GPSr suffers form a good 6-12 M error I don't know why but is is always different from my wife's GPSr

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The GPS system is subject to 6 types of errors. What are they?

Multi path

Ionospheric

individual receiver

Troposheric

Ephemeris

Atomic clock

 

based on numerous lessons taught a fews years ago

 

My GPSr suffers form a good 6-12 M error I don't know why but is is always different from my wife's GPSr

 

Works for me.

 

Ionospheric effects ± 5 meters

Shifts in the satellite orbits ± 2.5 meter

Clock errors of the satellites' clocks ± 2 meter

Multipath effect ± 1 meter

Tropospheric effects ± 0.5 meter

Calculation and rounding errors ± 1 meter

 

Altogether this sums up to an error of ± 15 meters. Corrections by systems like WAAS and EGNOS, which mainly reduce ionospheric effects, but also improve orbits and clock errors, the overall error is reduced to approximately ± 3 - 5 meters

 

The Gps System

 

Have at'er stagunner.

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I will make it an easy one

 

What and where is the highest point in Nova Scotia?

 

is it the highlands in Cape Breton? I think it is a National or provincial park

 

I just got back from Halifax

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I will make it an easy one

 

What and where is the highest point in Nova Scotia?

 

is it the highlands in Cape Breton? I think it is a National or provincial park

 

I just got back from Halifax

 

close but you need to put the what and where in

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close but you need to put the what and where in

 

One I actually think I know; it's White Hill - I couldn't remember "where" that is until I read the last post - it is in the Cape Breton Highlands.

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close but you need to put the what and where in

 

One I actually think I know; it's White Hill - I couldn't remember "where" that is until I read the last post - it is in the Cape Breton Highlands.

 

That is it

 

White Hill (highest point of Cape Breton Highlands, and highest point in Nova Scotia, 46° 42' N, 60° 36' W)

El 532m so it is still a hill

 

Your turn RAC777

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Sorry for delay folks; the "forum updated" note didn't get to me.

 

 

----

 

TWO OPTIONS HERE! Answer to either wins!

 

You can either answer the "GENERAL KNOWLEDGE" question OR do some Geocaching research!

 

----

 

GENERAL KNOWLEDGE

 

Which town in Ontario shares a name with a cocktail made with egg derived liqeur?

 

----

 

RESEARCH AND FUN!

 

If you take..

 

The number of the month (e.g. 1 = JAN, 2 = FEB) that the oldest active cache in BC was placed.

 

Add to this..

 

The day of the month (e.g. 1, 2, 3...28...30..31) that the oldest active cache in Ontario was placed.

 

And subtract...

 

The number of Geocaching Mega Events that have occured in Ontario

 

And add..

 

The day of the month that the oldest active Virtual Cache in Ontario was placed

 

And add....

 

The difficulty rating of the most northerly active cache in Ontario..

 

And multiply by...

 

The number of the month (e.g. 1 = JAN, 2 = FEB) that the first Wherigo in Canada was published.

 

What do you get? (other than an aversion to mathematics)

 

<Don't show your work,.. in case you goof and someone else corrects themselves!>

Edited by RCA777

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