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jhuoni

Category Proposal: Defenders of the Alamo

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According to Wiki there were 115 men that were at the Battle of the Alamo. Alamo Defenders

 

MOST were from the US, but there were some which came from across the big pond. England, Ireland, France, and Spain. The Irish at the Alamo

 

The first obstacle that I see is that most of the well known defenders all ready have multiple waymarks in multiple categories: David Crockett from Tennessee has at least 50 waymarks and James Bowie from Kentucky has at least 15 waymarks. James Bonham and William Barrett Travis were from what is now Saluda County, SC. Travis/Bonham Memorial Waymark. There are Texas Historical Markers which are about the events leading up to and following the Battle of the Alamo.

 

These cross-listed waymarks are unavoidable - what I am hoping to find is the markers and monuments in the towns where the lesser known defenders were from.

I'm sure they exist and that would be the goal of this category.

 

The floor is now open for your comments...

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According to Wiki there were 115 men that were at the Battle of the Alamo. Alamo Defenders

 

MOST were from the US, but there were some which came from across the big pond. England, Ireland, France, and Spain. The Irish at the Alamo

 

The first obstacle that I see is that most of the well known defenders all ready have multiple waymarks in multiple categories: David Crockett from Tennessee has at least 50 waymarks and James Bowie from Kentucky has at least 15 waymarks. James Bonham and William Barrett Travis were from what is now Saluda County, SC. Travis/Bonham Memorial Waymark. There are Texas Historical Markers which are about the events leading up to and following the Battle of the Alamo.

 

These cross-listed waymarks are unavoidable - what I am hoping to find is the markers and monuments in the towns where the lesser known defenders were from.

I'm sure they exist and that would be the goal of this category.

 

The floor is now open for your comments...

 

That number was from an article that was preliminary and incomplete. The historical record gives names of 189 Texian and 9 Tejano defenders that were killed at the Alamo, plus as many as 15 (maybe more) survivors plus more defenders who were sent out as couriers or for other reasons and did not make it back before the seige was over.

 

Most of the defenders were Texian (Americans who colonized Texas), some were native Tejano, there were Americans from all across most of the US. And in addition to the above countries, there were also defenders from Scotland, Germany, and France. That does not count the countries of origin of many of the Texians and Americans who were themselves relatively recent immigrants from Europe.

 

Given that, there is quite an opportunity for not only waymarks for monuments or markers at the origins of the defenders, but also for places along their travels that led to their roles in Texas' fight fir independence and their gravesites. This same theme could be used to expand the category to include all veterans of the Texas War for Independence from the opening shots in Gonzales, TX to the final surrender of Santa Ana at San Jacinto.

 

Most people do not realize it, but the Fight for Texas was a truly international effort.

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We are proud Texans and will vote YES on this category! Glad to see our European brothers looking for their connections to the Texas Revolution ;)

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We are proud Texans and will vote YES on this category! Glad to see our European brothers looking for their connections to the Texas Revolution ;)

 

I wanted to start this reply off like this:

 

DUDE! I'M FROM TEXAS - but I remembered that you are a DUDETTE.

 

Thirty Two Years in San Antonio - that will always be home. Four years in the Houston area. One year about 60 miles from Amarillo in a town called Hereford and a year in East Texas - let's just call that area Jasper.

 

I was pretty sure that I would have the backing of ALL TEXANS, but there are some other waymarkers out there that I need to get some feedback from.

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According to Wiki there were 115 men that were at the Battle of the Alamo. Alamo Defenders

 

MOST were from the US, but there were some which came from across the big pond. England, Ireland, France, and Spain. The Irish at the Alamo

 

The first obstacle that I see is that most of the well known defenders all ready have multiple waymarks in multiple categories: David Crockett from Tennessee has at least 50 waymarks and James Bowie from Kentucky has at least 15 waymarks. James Bonham and William Barrett Travis were from what is now Saluda County, SC. Travis/Bonham Memorial Waymark. There are Texas Historical Markers which are about the events leading up to and following the Battle of the Alamo.

 

These cross-listed waymarks are unavoidable - what I am hoping to find is the markers and monuments in the towns where the lesser known defenders were from.

I'm sure they exist and that would be the goal of this category.

 

The floor is now open for your comments...

 

That number was from an article that was preliminary and incomplete. The historical record gives names of 189 Texian and 9 Tejano defenders that were killed at the Alamo, plus as many as 15 (maybe more) survivors plus more defenders who were sent out as couriers or for other reasons and did not make it back before the seige was over.

 

Most of the defenders were Texian (Americans who colonized Texas), some were native Tejano, there were Americans from all across most of the US. And in addition to the above countries, there were also defenders from Scotland, Germany, and France. That does not count the countries of origin of many of the Texians and Americans who were themselves relatively recent immigrants from Europe.

 

Given that, there is quite an opportunity for not only waymarks for monuments or markers at the origins of the defenders, but also for places along their travels that led to their roles in Texas' fight fir independence and their gravesites. This same theme could be used to expand the category to include all veterans of the Texas War for Independence from the opening shots in Gonzales, TX to the final surrender of Santa Ana at San Jacinto.

 

Most people do not realize it, but the Fight for Texas was a truly international effort.

 

 

That is exactly why I QUOTED my source. I don't hold Wiki as a very reliable resource, but I needed some quick facts and they had a list of names and origins.

 

I was hoping to start a category to include all Texas Independence related markers and sites.

 

I'm still hoping for someone to chime in about a marker in some small town honoring a native son who fought at the Alamo and is not one of the famous names. What would really be a great help in getting support for this category would be for someone from outside of the US to tell me about a historical marker honoring someone in their country who fought at the Alamo. (I can dream)

 

I spent most of my life in San Antonio. It wasn't until I moved outside of Texas did I actually realize that most of the defenders were not from Texas. I currently live about 30 miles from where Travis and Bonham were from - Saluda County, SC. At the time it was part of Edgefield County. Bonham/Travis Memorial William Barrett Travis, Lt Col.

 

Ironically, I just flipped the channel on the TV and found the John Wayne movie - The Alamo (1960).

 

I'm still looking for comments...

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This is a more RELIABLE source for The Alamo Defenders.

 

Yep. That is one of my common primary sources. Here's another great Texas history resource. And here are some useful links courtesty of the Daughters of the Republic of Texas, and her is the site for The Presidio La Bahia.

 

But when researching the Alamo, Goliad and many other aspects of the Texas Revolution, be careful. There are a LOT of guesses, suppositions, theories, misstatements, assumptions, and outright lies out there.

 

If you have not yet had the chance, you should visit the Bob Bullock State History Museum in Austin.

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This is a pretty narrow category concept. This is not only confined to one country, but to one state. While it may be true that the battle for Texas was international and that there were a few defenders at the Alamo, are there memorials to them anywhere outside of Texas, or the U.S.? That is the real question. Even if the answer is yes, are there enough of them to sustain a stand-alone category?

 

While I do believe there is a place for niche categories, I'm not sure this is one of them.

 

There are probably hundreds of similar, largely local, categories. How about the heroes of the Samil movement of 1919 in Korea's struggle for independence from Japanese rule? Oh, here is a list of other sieges, including the Alamo: List of Sieges

 

I'm just raising the questions. :rolleyes: Far be it from me to mess with Texas!

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This is a pretty narrow category concept. This is not only confined to one country, but to one state. While it may be true that the battle for Texas was international and that there were a few defenders at the Alamo, are there memorials to them anywhere outside of Texas, or the U.S.? That is the real question. Even if the answer is yes, are there enough of them to sustain a stand-alone category?

 

While I do believe there is a place for niche categories, I'm not sure this is one of them.

 

There are probably hundreds of similar, largely local, categories. How about the heroes of the Samil movement of 1919 in Korea's struggle for independence from Japanese rule? Oh, here is a list of other sieges, including the Alamo: List of Sieges

 

I'm just raising the questions. :rolleyes: Far be it from me to mess with Texas!

 

Thanks for recognizing the Texas Highway Departments famous anit-litter campaign! Don' Mess With Texas

 

As you can see there wasn't much chatter on this subject, so I let it "Ride Off Into The Sunset".

 

As Roy and Dale would say: "Happy Trails" laugh.gif

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According to Wiki there were 115 men that were at the Battle of the Alamo. Alamo Defenders

 

MOST were from the US, but there were some which came from across the big pond. England, Ireland, France, and Spain. The Irish at the Alamo

 

...

 

The floor is now open for your comments...

 

Well, interesting topic for some of us, at least, but frankly .. it is far too local and - redundant.

Specific Wars Monuments and Memorials and / or Battlefields sounds to be designed exactly for this kind of waymarks.

(just my personal view)

Edited by Rikitan
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