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Dolfy

Rock Identification

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I'm looking for a good way to identify some local rocks. I want to put together some EarthCaches but really don't know what types I'm looking at. If I know what it is I won't have any problems researching it and putting something together. Thanks!

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You might look on the web to see if anyone has a site on local geology. Or hit the library and check for geology field guides. Or touch base with local colleges/universities and see if they can recommend a good resource.

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I'm looking for a good way to identify some local rocks. I want to put together some EarthCaches but really don't know what types I'm looking at. If I know what it is I won't have any problems researching it and putting something together. Thanks!

It looks like you’re from PA.

The quickest reference for a beginner would be to get on the PA DCNR website. Once there look for the PA Topographic and Geologic Survey. They will have various publications that you can download from the site. Another source could be a local college or university. You may want to try West Chester University. A former college prof of mine [from Cal U], Dr. Nikitina is an instructor there. She or someone there may be willing to give you a hand? Would you know anyone who works for an environmental firm? They usually have an earth sciencist on staff. Also check local caching groups in your area there may be someone willing to help.

Let me know how things turn out.

 

An after thought....

You could email me w/a description or intent of your future ECs and perhaps I could provide some guidence?

Edited by GEO WALKER

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An after thought....

You could email me w/a discription or intent of your future ECs and perhaps I could provide some guidence?

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I had checked the DCNR website and looked at the topographic map they have showing the types of rocks found in different regions. I used that info to try and narrow it down as to what I am looking at and then I get confused. I think I figure it out and then I second guess myself. I'd rather be sure about it then guess and put out a bad EC. TerryDad2 is going to try and help me out so I think I'm in good hands. :)

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I had checked the DCNR website and looked at the topographic map they have showing the types of rocks found in different regions. I used that info to try and narrow it down as to what I am looking at and then I get confused. I think I figure it out and then I second guess myself. I'd rather be sure about it then guess and put out a bad EC. TerryDad2 is going to try and help me out so I think I'm in good hands. :)

Sounds Good... If you need help, let me know...

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The book, Roadside Geology of Pennsylvania, very good resource, and they have books for many states:

http://www.amazon.com/Roadside-Geology-Pennsylvania/dp/0878422277

 

Info on the whole series:

http://mountain-press.com/series_detail.php?series_key=2

 

As a general strategy, I suggest using some sort of field notes or geologic map to get an idea of what SHOULD be there on the ground, and then trying to positively identify the rocks in-person, and hope they match!

 

This map is nice, but only helps in a broad sense, you'd want something with finer detail:

http://www.dcnr.state.pa.us/topogeo/maps/map7.pdf

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One thing to consider also, in areas that have much soil atop the rocks... glaciers did a lot of moving and shuffling things about.

Personally, I do not know if PA was heavily glaciated or not. It is something to keep in mind. Bedrock of course, is a different story -- and believe me, each type of bedrock has a story, and then some.

 

Your DNR (equivalent) really would be a super source, based primarily on mining studies. Nearly any university is going to have Earth Science/Geology related schools. Kissing up to a geology professor would be a good move, even a grad student -- and do not pass up on the smaller colleges and universities, either. Most any Natural History Museum or mining museum in your area would be a plus to check into. If they can't supply you with the info, they know who can!

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