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Swag on Digits


Kwitzats
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I am currently in the process of making a signature item to leave at caches. It is going to be a business card cd with geocaching software and my GC name printed on the front. What do you think i should put on the cd I allready am planing to put a massive gpx file from my compiled pqs but what else do you suggest are the any short videos related to geocaching out there. Also staples has 64mb flash drives fo 8 bucks i may get a bundle of those to leave or at least make a few tbs. Any suggestion would be appreciated.

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If I found such a CD, I would not put it in my computer. Why risk a virus attack? It is no different than not eating food items left in a cache.

 

If the listed contents included GPX files from pocket queries, I would report this to Groundspeak as a violation of the terms of use. You can review them here.

 

it would only apply if you were not able to acess GC.com if you can you are a licensee and i could tranfer it to you as i understand, but i supose others could find the data, even if unintetionaly and would be a violation of said aggreement. As far as viruses if you dont know how those things work and are scared you could just leave cd where it is. So must reiterate the question of what to suggest adding as im assuming the threat of reporting me to Groundspeak means you you dont suggest gpx files.

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it would only apply if you were not able to acess GC.com if you can you are a licensee and i could tranfer it to you as i understand

 

Well, that's one interpretation of the license agreement, I suppose. I was looking more at this line:

 

Licensee shall not sell, rent, lease, sublicense, lend, assign, time-share, or transfer, in whole or in part, or provide unlicensed third parties access to the Data, Related Materials, any updates, or Licensee's rights under this Agreement.

 

But hey, what do I know. I'm just a contract lawyer.

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it would only apply if you were not able to acess GC.com if you can you are a licensee and i could tranfer it to you as i understand

 

Well, that's one interpretation of the license agreement, I suppose. I was looking more at this line:

 

Licensee shall not sell, rent, lease, sublicense, lend, assign, time-share, or transfer, in whole or in part, or provide unlicensed third parties access to the Data, Related Materials, any updates, or Licensee's rights under this Agreement.

 

But hey, what do I know. I'm just a contract lawyer.

 

Then i would have to defer to your expert opinion, being just a glorified grunt with a keen sense of direction and the authorization to give terminal guidance to things that go boom. I was just thinking that " unlicensed third parties" meant non members who have not agreed to terms of Agreement. Again maybe gpx files are not a good idea but if you were not afraid of viruses(having the ability to view files without executing them) what would you like to find in digital format, pictures, how to manuals, ect..

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Sheesh....Lep....chill out. You would turn the guy in?? What a schmuck. I could understand if he was trying to make a buck by stealing the data to sell, but to share with cachers (even if it is inefficient) is a little, well, schmucky! [:laughing:]

 

And Kwitzats.....I wouldn't use your CD either for virus concerns, but if I did...pics of awesome cache views, videos, urls, are all fun. Just avoid copyrighted material.

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I'd put a CD I found in a cache in my computer. Run a virus scan and have at it.

 

There is a local who gets microdrives from his job and uses them as trade items. He always puts interesting material on there to read/see/hear.

 

Another cacher I know placed a puzzle cache where he made a CD which contained the clues to find the cache. He then made a bunch of copies of the CD and placed them in area caches. In order to find the puzzle cache, you had to locate a CD, use it to figure out the puzzle, and then go look for the cache. As far as I remember (this was several years ago) the cache was quite popular. I still have one of the CDs.

 

I don't think there is any problem using a CD as a trade item.

 

Jamie

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I don't think there is any problem using a CD as a trade item.

 

I'm inclined to agree. Seems there are two schools of computer users. One has up-to-date anti-virus measures in place, and aren't in any particular danger from a potential virus on a CDR. The other group doesn't take A/V measures, and probably already has more viruses than you can shake a stick at.

 

I'm in the first group. I have several neighbors who are in the later group, who come to me when their computers fall down.

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Sheesh....Lep....chill out. You would turn the guy in?? What a schmuck. I could understand if he was trying to make a buck by stealing the data to sell, but to share with cachers (even if it is inefficient) is a little, well, schmucky! [:laughing:]

 

And Kwitzats.....I wouldn't use your CD either for virus concerns, but if I did...pics of awesome cache views, videos, urls, are all fun. Just avoid copyrighted material.

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Then i would have to defer to your expert opinion, being just a glorified grunt with a keen sense of direction and the authorization to give terminal guidance to things that go boom. I was just thinking that " unlicensed third parties" meant non members who have not agreed to terms of Agreement. Again maybe gpx files are not a good idea but if you were not afraid of viruses(having the ability to view files without executing them) what would you like to find in digital format, pictures, how to manuals, ect..

 

I wouldn't worry too much about the legal stuff, your intentions are good, and that is what counts the most. While GPX format may not be the best solution, there may be other ways, like excel files or *.loc files, or even plain text descriptions. I'm sure that after you investigate all of the possibilities and find one that doesn't infringe on any owner rights, you will find a way to make your signature item. When you do, I hope to find one in a cache on a future visit. :huh:

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Of course all these brilliant IT folks do know that a virus scanner only detects virii that they already know about. In the time it takes for a security company the find out about a new virus, figure out how to detect and remove it, and update the scanner definition file; thousands and thousands of systems get infected. And how up to date IS your scanner? I've seen as many as 50 minor updates in a single day for mine. You do update your antivirus software every 15 minutes, right?

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What do you think i should put on the cd?

I wouldn't put .gpx files on there, simply because the data is readily available elsewhere, however, I at least wouldn't tattle on you if you did. I'm a cop in real life, I don't need to be a cop in my geolife. Perhaps you could put in all your favorite pictures? I will say that, if I found one of your CD's in a cache, it would remain there. Assuming that an antivirus program will prevent any and all viruses, (virusi?), from entering your system is paramount to assuming the rhythm method will keep you from becoming pregnant. An A/V program can only detect/defeat those viruses in it's definitions.

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Of course all these brilliant IT folks do know that a virus scanner only detects virii that they already know about. In the time it takes for a security company the find out about a new virus, figure out how to detect and remove it, and update the scanner definition file; thousands and thousands of systems get infected. And how up to date IS your scanner? I've seen as many as 50 minor updates in a single day for mine. You do update your antivirus software every 15 minutes, right?

 

You have all caught on to my devioushly brilliant plan to infect the world one cache finder at a time by rewritting viruses then burning to disk and placing in caches every 15 minutes. Sounded like a good idea considering that no one ever reads logs that might indicate that someone elses gps blew up due to a virus caught from Kwitzats' disk(maybe a little exagerated) or that there is no way that the police could track me down thru Groundspeak or my email adress or finding out where i've been recently. And besides as far as efficency goes who ever heard of any thing more efficient than dowloading coords off the internet uploading them to gps and hiking to who knows where to, in search of a hidden box to just to expand my collection of Mcdonalds toys.

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I'm inclined to agree. Seems there are two schools of computer users. One has up-to-date anti-virus measures in place, and aren't in any particular danger from a potential virus on a CDR. The other group doesn't take A/V measures, and probably already has more viruses than you can shake a stick at.

 

Actually, there are three groups.

 

The third group uses Mac OS X, which currently has no virii and is immune to Windows virii, so we can put any CD in with impunity :lol:

 

Not to start a platform war or anything :lol: Actually, any Linux user is probably also in that camp.

 

I have to say though that when I saw the thread subject I thought it would be about something else entirely...

Edited by GreyingJay
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If I found such a CD, I would not put it in my computer. Why risk a virus attack? It is no different than not eating food items left in a cache.

 

If the listed contents included GPX files from pocket queries, I would report this to Groundspeak as a violation of the terms of use. You can review them here.

On point one: Agreed. Anyone who would put an anoymmous CD into their PC promiscuously is a likely candidate for the looney bin.

 

Agreed. PQs are only for premium members.

 

 

And, let me also add, the space aliens often place their stealth mind contorl viruses on such anonymous CDs as these which are circulated promiscuously. If someone loads sucn an infected CD on a drive in their PC, the stealth virus takes over the PC and monitor, and reprograms the mind of the PC user over the next ten minutes, turning them into a hapless zombie slave of the evil reptoid reptilian space aliens. It is quite sad, and quite horrifying. :lol::lol: (I know that what I wrote here about the alien threat is true because I read it on the Internet.)

 

 

 

:P:huh:

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Don't forget the PC virus that slowly leaks all the air out of your SleepNumber bed, makes your breath stink, causes your waist to expand, enhances male pattern baldness, leaves dust buildup on your ceiling fans and convinces your cat to stop using the litter box. I think it's called the Clan Riffster virus. So far, my PC is the only one I know that is infected.

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Of course all these brilliant IT folks do know that a virus scanner only detects virii that they already know about. In the time it takes for a security company the find out about a new virus, figure out how to detect and remove it, and update the scanner definition file; thousands and thousands of systems get infected. And how up to date IS your scanner? I've seen as many as 50 minor updates in a single day for mine. You do update your antivirus software every 15 minutes, right?

 

My AV scanner picks up updates as they become available. Never really been an issue for me anyway, as I've never had a virus infection. I've been an Internet geek since the first Chicago area dial-ups started offering it, and have had broadband for over five years. Before the 'net, I ran a free public access Fido BBS and file hub. Basic precautions have always done the trick for me. Don't open every attachment that comes along, don't run questionable files, don't click yes to ever pop-up message, etc.

 

I have had virus infections in very controlled circumstances - when I'm surfing the dark underbelly of the web I use a virtual machine. I don't bother with A/V software on it, and frequently use it to test questionable files or URLs. On occasion it has gotten an infection, but that's what it's there for. Just delete the VM and spawn a new copy.

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Actually, there are three groups.

The third group uses Mac OS X, which currently has no virii and is immune to Windows virii, so we can put any CD in with impunity :)

Actually, any Linux user is probably also in that camp.

 

Linux/Mac users certainly have less to worry about where viruses are concerned. In large part that is due to technical reasons. However, those systems certainly aren't immune to viruses in general - especially since some of the most effective attacks have relied not on technical matters but instead on social engineering.

 

Also, a virus writer by definition wants to maximize his impact. Naturally, he's going to write for the largest audience available, which is Windows systems. If Mac/Linux boxes were as wide spread as Windows machines, I have no doubt that the technical difficulties would be overcome by enterprising malware authors.

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the space aliens often place their stealth mind contorl viruses on such anonymous CDs as these which are circulated promiscuously. If someone loads sucn an infected CD on a drive in their PC, the stealth virus takes over the PC and monitor, and reprograms the mind of the PC user over the next ten minutes, turning them into a hapless zombie slave of the evil reptoid reptilian space aliens. It is quite sad, and quite horrifying.

 

I believe you're thinking of AOL CDs, not alien CDs.

 

Almost, but not quite, the same thing.

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the space aliens often place their stealth mind contorl viruses on such anonymous CDs as these which are circulated promiscuously. If someone loads sucn an infected CD on a drive in their PC, the stealth virus takes over the PC and monitor, and reprograms the mind of the PC user over the next ten minutes, turning them into a hapless zombie slave of the evil reptoid reptilian space aliens. It is quite sad, and quite horrifying.

 

I believe you're thinking of AOL CDs, not alien CDs.

 

Almost, but not quite, the same thing.

I agree; I stand corrected! :rolleyes::)

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My AV scanner picks up updates as they become available. Never really been an issue for me anyway, as I've never had a virus infection. I've been an Internet geek since the first Chicago area dial-ups started offering it, and have had broadband for over five years. Before the 'net, I ran a free public access Fido BBS and file hub. Basic precautions have always done the trick for me. Don't open every attachment that comes along, don't run questionable files, don't click yes to ever pop-up message, etc.

 

I have had virus infections in very controlled circumstances - when I'm surfing the dark underbelly of the web I use a virtual machine. I don't bother with A/V software on it, and frequently use it to test questionable files or URLs. On occasion it has gotten an infection, but that's what it's there for. Just delete the VM and spawn a new copy.

In my opinion, your post highlights why this swag is a bad idea. You clearly are technically savvy and forward thinking regarding viruses. However, most geocachers are not as knowledgeable as you are.

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Linux/Mac users certainly have less to worry about where viruses are concerned. In large part that is due to technical reasons. However, those systems certainly aren't immune to viruses in general - especially since some of the most effective attacks have relied not on technical matters but instead on social engineering.

 

Also, a virus writer by definition wants to maximize his impact. Naturally, he's going to write for the largest audience available, which is Windows systems. If Mac/Linux boxes were as wide spread as Windows machines, I have no doubt that the technical difficulties would be overcome by enterprising malware authors.

 

Well, yes, the fact that the kind of damage most viruses want to do would require sysadmin privileges (root or sudo) to work. Certainly one could do damage with social engineering (the classic example is the "rm -r *" shell script disguised as some other application) but even then damage is contained to at best the user's own home directory and at worst the user's own machine.

 

Anyway, you're certainly right that my OS X will not always be 100% virus free. In recent months hackers and security consultants have demonstrated a number of vulnerabilities (including one apparent one where connecting to a Wifi network with a particular brand of Wifi card allows a hacker to get shell access!) but it's (for now) certainly nowhere near the levels of paranoia that the majority of users go through (witness this thread). Or worse, utter indifference -- I know one friend who spends entire weekends rebuilding and reinstalling his PC after failures of both the hardware and software variety, and he shrugs it off as if it were SOP!

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I've used CDR's as trade items. Most of what I've left behind were USGS TOPO quads digitized as TIFF files (Available free on the web, no copyright issues, just too large to download for anyone without broadband.)

 

I'd do it with other software too, so long as it was something I think a cacher would enjoy (caching/hiking videos, caching related freeware, etc.)

 

If the cacher that found it was too paranoid to take and use the disk they could always trade for something else.

 

AR_kayaker

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I wouldn't worry too much about a cd left in a cache. I've found several of them (15+) in the past year and every single one was so scratched up as to be impossible to transmit a virus. Afterall, a computer must be able to read the CD before a virus can infect it.

 

Thats because some people think of junk as good trade items and take no consideration to protect the media.

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I wouldn't worry too much about a cd left in a cache. I've found several of them (15+) in the past year and every single one was so scratched up as to be impossible to transmit a virus. Afterall, a computer must be able to read the CD before a virus can infect it.
Thats because some people think of junk as good trade items and take no consideration to protect the media.

I think I would lay blame on the cacher who left the CD in the cache. If he simply tosses in a naked CD, it's going to get destroyed. If it is protected in a jewel case, it will likely be fine.

Edited by sbell111
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Oops! Reading these recent posts and others in this thread -- some of which are now starting to mention such risque things as "naked CDs" -- makes me realize that we may all be talking about different things! I had assumed that we were talking about leaving CD-ROMS, aka CDs, in geocaches. However, are some of the posters referring to leaving the other type of CDs (i.e., cross-dressers) in caches? If so, we must remember that most caches are too small to hold a person, and it is also considered impolite to leave a person in a cache because of the limited supplies of air, water and food. Thus, please think twice before leaving the second type of CD in a cache! <_<

 

:rolleyes::rolleyes::)

Edited by Vinny & Sue Team
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I wouldn't worry too much about a cd left in a cache. I've found several of them (15+) in the past year and every single one was so scratched up as to be impossible to transmit a virus. Afterall, a computer must be able to read the CD before a virus can infect it.
Thats because some people think of junk as good trade items and take no consideration to protect the media.

I think I would lay blame on the cacher who left the CD in the cache. If he simply tosses in a naked CD, it's going to get destroyed. If it is protected in a jewel case, it will likely be fine.

 

The majority of jewel cases break very easily... as a matter of fact I can't think of any that don't. If you were to put it in a DVD case with locking tabs, then maybe it'd have a little longer life span, but still... they get messed up pretty easy.

 

I do have to agree with Vinny & Sue Team though... it just isn't nice to leave the other CD's in a cache without at least punching air holes in it... but of course then you risk ruining the cache when it rains, and people will complain that you are defacing their cache. So therefore I say definately don't leave the other kind of CD's in a cache.

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