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Sissy-n-CR

Coins Disappearing In The Mail

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Not that I am claiming any kind of expertise, but after mailing out 300 geocoins, several to other countries, and not having lost the first one that I am aware of, I feel compelled to give some unsolicited advice.

 

I have received two empty envelopes that once housed trade coins.

 

Coins sent in a regular flat envelope go through several post office sorting machines. These machines are designed for thin, flat pieces. The coins are flat enough to not get noticed by the person loading the sorter, but not flat enough to go through. The coin gets hung up in the machinery, but the envelope goes through. The coin usually falls onto the floor, and by the time it is noticed, the envelope is well on its merry way.

 

Postal employees have no way of matching a loose coin with the right envelope.

My local claims guy says he has several commemorative coins in his desk, although no geocoins.

 

The sender should go to their local branch with a picture of the coin and its dimensions. Ask to fill out a 1510 form, which traces the envelope's route. If you attach the picture, there is a chance you can get the coin back, but it is not a quick process.

 

There are two simple things you can do to prevent this from happening:

 

Don't send a flat envelope. Use bubble wrap, wadded newspaper, or anything that will give the envelope some thickness. This almost guarantees it will be hand sorted instead of machine sorted. Make sure the coin is firmly secured to something that has the same area as the envelope. Loose coins sliding around can have enough momentum to escape.

 

Use lots of strong packing tape. Fold the tape over each edge and along any seams in the envelope. This will reinforce the edges and may prevent the coin from ripping loose.

 

If this advice keeps even one coin from going MIA, it will be worth being looked upon as a terrible nag. :D

 

Sissy

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Not that I am claiming any kind of expertise, but after mailing out 300 geocoins, several to other countries, and not having lost the first one that I am aware of, I feel compelled to give some unsolicited advice.

 

I have received two empty envelopes that once housed trade coins.

 

Coins sent in a regular flat envelope go through several post office sorting machines. These machines are designed for thin, flat pieces. The coins are flat enough to not get noticed by the person loading the sorter, but not flat enough to go through. The coin gets hung up in the machinery, but the envelope goes through. The coin usually falls onto the floor, and by the time it is noticed, the envelope is well on its merry way.

 

Postal employees have no way of matching a loose coin with the right envelope.

My local claims guy says he has several commemorative coins in his desk, although no geocoins.

 

The sender should go to their local branch with a picture of the coin and its dimensions. Ask to fill out a 1510 form, which traces the envelope's route. If you attach the picture, there is a chance you can get the coin back, but it is not a quick process.

 

There are two simple things you can do to prevent this from happening:

 

Don't send a flat envelope. Use bubble wrap, wadded newspaper, or anything that will give the envelope some thickness. This almost guarantees it will be hand sorted instead of machine sorted. Make sure the coin is firmly secured to something that has the same area as the envelope. Loose coins sliding around can have enough momentum to escape.

 

Use lots of strong packing tape. Fold the tape over each edge and along any seams in the envelope. This will reinforce the edges and may prevent the coin from ripping loose.

 

If this advice keeps even one coin from going MIA, it will be worth being looked upon as a terrible nag. :D

 

Sissy

Just like my mom used to nag me. What she nagged me about turns out to be good advice. So keep nagging! laughing-smiley-011.gif

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When I've mailed out coins, I'm made sure the coin was wrapped in something, like cardboard or bubble wrap. I only use the padded manila envelopes and make sure I tape the end even though it's self-adhesive. I then use the self-service machine at the post office. The postage that prints out is a large sticker, about 3"x3" and I put that over the tape and self-adhesive flap. So there's three barriers the coin has to get through. No problems so far, with about 50 coins mailed out. Knock on wood. But I agree, a regular white envelope should never be used. They're just too fragile.

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