Jump to content

ISS pass Jan 22


vulture1957
Followers 1

Recommended Posts

When you go to the Satellite View, most of the time you can see a geographic item near the area at the edge of the view (IE - ISS Track crossing one of the great lakes.) Find a City near that point and search from there to extend the ISS track farther.

Another way is to use the Longitude/Latitude lines you see in the SAT View and estimate the next Lon/Lat point. Those lines are 10° apart. Go to the Change my location page and scroll to the bottom. You can change the NAME and the longitude/Latitude. You may also want to change the time zone.

On May 18 at 22:02 the ISS will pass OK City at an altitude of 53° to the NW. See left photo.

Just after 22:07 it passes over W80° at roughly N47°. Now I change the Location page at the bottom, leaving the top part blank, and change to eastern time, and run the ISS Pass again for the new location. Just after 23:07 the ISS will pass over N47 W80  at max Altitude of 89° to the NNW. See right photo.

 

 

ISS OK City plus.jpg

Edited by 8Nuts MotherGoose
trying to get photo to show.
Link to comment

CONTINUING THE ABOVE POST.

My next search would be from a point just off the photo at N53 W50. My time will be off but the minutes will be correct when I reach land in Europe. Just remember there will be about 5 or 6 hours added plus roughly 8-15 minutes. By doing this for several ISS Passes on different days and drawing lines on Google maps (https://www.google.com/maps/@38.1805015,-90.2867323,4.95z) we end up with this:

 

 

ISS World 17-20.jpg

Link to comment
19 minutes ago, Max and 99 said:

Thanks for the mapping lesson! So I guess the answer is no, there isn't a site that helps me coordinate a pass seen from 2 locations? I'll have to do the tedious  work myself. Thank you for confirming! 

But once you have done it, you will always know which cities are on the same ISS Pass as your home location. The few degrees difference in the Observable Pass will also change the same for the other cities. You will always be observing the Pass in only two direction - NW to SE or SW to NE. It will always be greater than 45° max Alt. Therefore, by doing some research once you also know where your partners will be. Here's a map showing an ISS Pass with the 45° limit line on either side of the pass. Anyone between the green lines can be your partner. The lines shift as the Pass shifts.

This photo is about 2-3 weeks old for the night of May 18. The pass time has changed a bit, and Pass has shifted slighted to the NW a few degrees.

ISS May 18-19a 2019 US.jpg

Link to comment
15 minutes ago, Max and 99 said:

That's a very good point! Thank you.

You'll notice the lines are parallel for you and your partners area of observation . The red pass lines actually get closer together as they approach N53°. Our friend, BK Hunter, near Vancouver is close to the 53rd and can observe passes that cover most of the United States.

A pass coming down from N53 that he observes as 45° to the SSW will pass near Salem, OR., over UT, and hit the coast of TX at Corpus Christi.

A pass coming down from N53 that he observes as 75° to the SSW will pass over Wyoming, Oklahoma City and hit the coast at New Orleans.

A pass coming down from N53 that he observes as 80° to the NNE will pass over Nebraska and hit the coast at Palm Beach, Florida.

A pass just reaching it's farthest north point he observes as 54° to the NNE will pass SW of Winnipeg, pass over Michigan, and hit the coast at Delaware.

I have not tracked any Passes for Vancouver that were still rising toward N53.

Unfortunately, because sunset is so late there, most of these passes will enter the Earths shadow before reaching any of us. He would have to get up at 3:00 am to observe a pass lit by an eastern sun for it to reach us at 5:00 am before daylight.

Link to comment
17 minutes ago, 8Nuts MotherGoose said:

You'll notice the lines are parallel for you and your partners area of observation . The red pass lines actually get closer together as they approach N53°. Our friend, BK Hunter, near Vancouver is close to the 53rd and can observe passes that cover most of the United States.

A pass coming down from N53 that he observes as 45° to the SSW will pass near Salem, OR., over UT, and hit the coast of TX at Corpus Christi.

A pass coming down from N53 that he observes as 75° to the SSW will pass over Wyoming, Oklahoma City and hit the coast at New Orleans.

A pass coming down from N53 that he observes as 80° to the NNE will pass over Nebraska and hit the coast at Palm Beach, Florida.

A pass just reaching it's farthest north point he observes as 54° to the NNE will pass SW of Winnipeg, pass over Michigan, and hit the coast at Delaware.

I have not tracked any Passes for Vancouver that were still rising toward N53.

Unfortunately, because sunset is so late there, most of these passes will enter the Earths shadow before reaching any of us. He would have to get up at 3:00 am to observe a pass lit by an eastern sun for it to reach us at 5:00 am before daylight.

I'll watch a pass at pretty much any time, but a very early morning pass makes it harder for me to find a partner.

Thanks for all the help!

Link to comment

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
Followers 1
×
×
  • Create New...