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Distance "Rule" vs Guideline


DragonflyTotem

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Cache Saturation

 

Cache containers and physical stages should generally be separated by a minimum of 0.1 miles (528 feet or 161 m). A physical stage is defined as any stage that contains a physical element placed by the geocache owner, such as a tag with the next set of coordinates or a container. Non-physical caches or stages including reference points, trailhead/parking coordinates and question to answer waypoints are exempt from this guideline.

The usage of the word stage in the first paragraph is confusing, especially once you read the second without have a firm understanding of the implications of all cache types.

 

Additionally, within a single multi-cache or mystery/puzzle cache, there is no minimum required distance between physical elements.

 

I include the third and final paragraph because....

Please don't hide a cache every 600 feet just because you can. The ultimate goals of the saturation guideline are to encourage you to seek out new places to hide caches rather than putting them in areas where caches already exist and to limit the number of caches hidden in a particular area, especially by the same hider. Groundspeak may further restrict cache listings in areas where cache saturation becomes a concern.

It clearly shows that there can be times when 528' is to close.

 

IMO, it should read...

Cache Saturation

 

A geocache and/or its physical stages should generally be separated by a minimum of 0.1 miles (528 feet or 161 m) from another geocache and or its physical stages. A physical stage is defined as any stage that contains a physical element placed by a geocache owner, such as a tag with the next set of coordinates or a container. Non-physical caches or stages including reference points, trailhead/parking coordinates and question to answer waypoints are exempt from this guideline.

 

Additionally, within a single multi-cache or mystery/puzzle cache, there is no minimum required distance between physical elements.

 

Please don't hide a cache every 600 feet just because you can. The ultimate goals of the saturation guideline are to encourage you to seek out new places to hide caches rather than putting them in areas where caches already exist and to limit the number of caches hidden in a particular area, especially by the same hider. Groundspeak may further restrict cache listings in areas where cache saturation becomes a concern.

In this format paragraph 1 clearly indicates separation of unrelated caches and paragraph 2 makes the exemption for multiple elements of one cache clear.

 

Keystone,

That guideline smacks of the very essence of a rule (also called one way guidelines for those that prefer using niceties) because it only states the distance can become further.

I do understand the reasoning behind GS not calling the guidelines rules.

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Thanks for accurately quoting the guideline text.

 

Yes, indeed, it's a one-way guideline -- just in the opposite direction. As a reviewer I am encouraged to make appropriate exceptions for caches less than 528 feet apart, but I have essentially no authority to deny caches that are more than 528 feet apart.

 

When's the last time someone stormed into the forums and complained about their caches being denied because they were 529 feet apart? 550 feet? 600 feet?

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I hadn't notice that the 528 (.1 miles) be came a distance for generally separating caches instead of a rule-of-thumb used by the reviewers. I liked the rule-of-thumb better because I was able to understand that ultimate goal of the guideline was to encourage cachers to seek out new place to hide cache and to limit the number of caches in a particular area. The 528 feet was just arbitrary and you could work with the reviewers to get your cache published. The OP, who quoted the old guidelines in part, shows that some people had problems understanding that an exception wasn't automatic and you needed to have a strong argument to get one. Keystones clarification shows that this is still the case but the new wording makes it clear that you should attempt to keep at least 528 feet between your cache (or a physical stage of your cache) and any other cache (or physical stage of another cache). If it is less confusing to others I'm OK with it, given the clarification Keystone has given in this thread. (It's a shame that the fact that reviewers can make an exception for an exceptional situation can't be put in the guidelines with out risking that someone will be believe that their cache is exceptional and complain if it isn't given an exception).

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Thanks for accurately quoting the guideline text.

 

Yes, indeed, it's a one-way guideline -- just in the opposite direction. As a reviewer I am encouraged to make appropriate exceptions for caches less than 528 feet apart, but I have essentially no authority to deny caches that are more than 528 feet apart.

 

When's the last time someone stormed into the forums and complained about their caches being denied because they were 529 feet apart? 550 feet? 600 feet?

I can't site the threads but I think "Power Trail" covers it. :) But that is a CO blocking themselves.

I can also predict that eventually it will happen CO vs CO.

Most likely it will happen in a recreation area where the reviewer knows what the land manager wants and understands that the land manager doesn't have the time to enforce every little thing so relies on the public to help.

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Power trail threads are old news. Got any current news?

 

How about power trails set up using hamster caches? You could put little hamster wheels in the container and harness the power to supply electricity to nearby homes. That would be worth granting exceptions to the saturation guideline. With enough hamster caches nearby, I could take my home off the grid. Go green!

 

Bruce

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Power trail threads are old news. Got any current news?

Define old news.

Do you mean as in...

It hasn't happened in the last six months?

It has been resolved and nobody will ever wander in here complaining about being told to spread out their caches or turn them into a multi-cache?

 

Granted there isn't exactly a flood of individuals but it has and will happen again. Unless all reviewers have been instructed to only recommend they be turned into multi-caches.

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"Old news" as in the phrase "power trail" is not part of the Cache Listing Requirements / Guidelines anymore.

 

http://www.geocaching.com/about/guidelines.aspx#sat

Cache Saturation

 

Cache containers and physical stages should generally be separated by a minimum of 0.1 miles (528 feet or 161 m). A physical stage is defined as any stage that contains a physical element placed by the geocache owner, such as a tag with the next set of coordinates or a container. Non-physical caches or stages including reference points, trailhead/parking coordinates and question to answer waypoints are exempt from this guideline.

 

Additionally, within a single multi-cache or mystery/puzzle cache, there is no minimum required distance between physical elements.

 

Please don't hide a cache every 600 feet just because you can. The ultimate goals of the saturation guideline are to encourage you to seek out new places to hide caches rather than putting them in areas where caches already exist and to limit the number of caches hidden in a particular area, especially by the same hider. Groundspeak may further restrict cache listings in areas where cache saturation becomes a concern.

Edited by Motorcycle_Mama
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"Old news" as in the phrase "power trail" is not part of the Cache Listing Requirements / Guidelines anymore.

 

http://www.geocaching.com/about/guidelines.aspx#sat

*wrings hands* so exuberant hiders have been set free... HONEY, LOAD UP THE VAN!

J/K

Honestly that is sad, as it will allow for the quick monopolization of Rails to Trails.

 

But then again only the phrase is gone, the gist of a power trail is accounted for in paragraph three sentences one and two. Sentence three maintains the right to restrict them.

Sure one could make an argument that that is only intended to prevent what people would generally view as a cluster but technically a PT is a cluster.

 

So when a flood of hiders from a specific local start complaining that CO X has monopolized 4 miles of a R2T, what happens?

So when a flood of seekers from the same local start complaining that 4 miles of a R2T with caches that are not fun for the whole family, what happens?

 

I would hope that the reviewers see the clarity of the saturation guidelines and prevent such a situation from ever happening.

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