Jump to content

Be kind to trees


geoJimi

Recommended Posts

I have a bison tube up in a tree, but I have it secured by zip ties. Maybe a polite email suggesting that they can use zipties which would achieve the same effect while not damaging the tree would be best.

Just a word of warning (which has been mentioned in other threads). If you use a zip tie or a string or whatever, to tie a cache to a tree or tree branch, please make it loose and check on it over the years. Trees grow, and over time the tree will grow into the tie, around the tie, etc. and could cause damage.

More than just damage, anything that totally encircles a tree trunk or branch will eventually result in DEATH of the "ringed" member. If it is the main trunk, the tree will die.

 

Trees use ONLY a small layer of the inner bark (called cambium) to transport food and water up the tree. If this layer is cut all the way around (called "ringing" the tree) the tree literally starves to death.

 

Given a choice of nail, screw or Ty_Rap ® to secure something to a tree, go with the nails and screws every time.

 

:) Are you specifically responding to me, or just adding to what I said for everyone else's benefit? If it was for me, then thank you for the lesson. :):D

General information for everyone's benefit.

 

Trees are by no means fragile. I intend to post a couple of interesting pictures of trees that have been absolutely BUTCHERED and are still surviving, yea verily possibly even thriving. "Life will find a way." - (mis?) quoted from "Jurassic Park"

 

You wanna see some real "unkindness" to trees, watch the highway department "trim trees" along side the road sometime... with a bushhog turned vertically... OH tTHE TREEMANITY!

 

The utility companies are notorious for their "bonsai" trees too (by that i mean cutting them in such a way that they grow in a grotesque pattern or at least a pattern atypical of the species.

Link to comment

All good points, CC.

 

Trees are by no means fragile. I intend to post a couple of interesting pictures of trees that have been absolutely BUTCHERED and are still surviving, yea verily possibly even thriving. "Life will find a way." - (mis?) quoted from "Jurassic Park"

 

You wanna see some real "unkindness" to trees, watch the highway department "trim trees" along side the road sometime... with a bushhog turned vertically... OH tTHE TREEMANITY!

 

The utility companies are notorious for their "bonsai" trees too (by that i mean cutting them in such a way that they grow in a grotesque pattern or at least a pattern atypical of the species.

 

Oh yeah... those bush hogs... I HATE the ugly scars those things leave along the roadside. Bushwhackers for trees. Shredded wheat where there used to be trees, all in the name of economy. Meanwhile, the department housed in the office next door is busy banning geocaching.

 

National Geographic, the Epitotme of All Things Ecologically Friendly, has taken 'core samples" from ancient cedar trees that existed before Lincoln was President. Our geotrails to the cache cause more ecological damage than anything that we could attach to a tree (nylon zipties... OMG!! Come ON now!!!)

 

BTW: the subject of this thread is "Be Kind to Trees", not "Get Owner's Permission". Being kind to trees sometimes means (kids, cover your eyes!) PRUNING them!!!

Link to comment

The only hooks I've ever seen in trees (for geocaching - I've seen big ones for hammocks and clotheslines) have been the absolute tiniest and skinniest hooks I've ever seen. They were on small branches out toward the end of limbs and were used to hang oak galls with bison tubes inside of them. If those hurt the tree then the dadgum thing needed to die anyway.

 

As for the "on my own property" thing I can do whatever I want. Period. If "tree huggers" are upset and don't want to look for the cache then so much the better.

Edited by Thrak
Link to comment

The only hooks I've ever seen in trees (for geocaching - I've seen big ones for hammocks and clotheslines) have been the absolute tiniest and skinniest hooks I've ever seen. They were on small branches out toward the end of limbs and were used to hang oak galls with bison tubes inside of them. If those hurt the tree then the dadgum thing needed to die anyway.

 

As for the "on my own property" thing I can do whatever I want. Period. If "tree huggers" are upset and don't want to look for the cache then so much the better.

:huh:

rofl

Link to comment

Just a word of warning (which has been mentioned in other threads). If you use a zip tie or a string or whatever, to tie a cache to a tree or tree branch, please make it loose and check on it over the years. Trees grow, and over time the tree will grow into the tie, around the tie, etc. and could cause damage.

 

Agreed. But this can easily be gotten around by cutting loose and reattaching periodically. Each time the cache is checked on, replace the attachment also, being careful to haul off all debris. This will prevent the string or ziptie from being overgrown, and at the same time protect it's integrity (Old plastic and string more likely to break and loose the cache).

 

Keep in mind the issue is not just a hole in the tree. While the hook, nail, or whatever fills the hole, there is no danger, but when removed an open invites invasive insects and possibly rot. Still, particularly in areas where wood is harvested, it is far better to remove unneeded metal from trees than to risk injury to unsuspecting persons. A small tube of wood paste comes in handy.

Link to comment

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
×
×
  • Create New...