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Using City Navigator on 60CSx


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All, I have an old version of maps (2003) that I got from a friend of mine and tried putting it on my 60CSx. I cannot seem to be able to create a route and have it select the roads (just creates line of sight to waypoints). It seems that this old version does not have this ability. I am wondering if anyone uses the latest versions of City Navigator NT North America and if it is possible to map to roads on it? I am looking at purchasing one if this is possible.

 

Thanks!

The Wanderers

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I use City Select North America v7 on my 60CS and it routes the roads nicely. I'm not sure if that is different than City Navigator or not though.

tjlee

 

Thanks. I just got off the phone with Garmin and they indicated as such. Using the City Nav NT 2009 it should route to roads with turn by turn indications. Looks like it may be the old version of software I am using.

 

Thanks!

The_Wanderers

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I use City Select North America v7 on my 60CS and it routes the roads nicely. I'm not sure if that is different than City Navigator or not though.

tjlee

 

Thanks. I just got off the phone with Garmin and they indicated as such. Using the City Nav NT 2009 it should route to roads with turn by turn indications. Looks like it may be the old version of software I am using.

 

Thanks!

The_Wanderers

 

The thing that irrigates me about Garmin is the cheaper, car systems come with a really good map loaded. But buy the top of the freakin line handheld? No maps. "Oh, you can BUY THEM for another 150$ or so!" *grrr*

 

That said.. yes, if you get the newer map package installed, you can do it. It can get kinda hairy at times, (got me SEVERELY confused trying to find my way through Buffalo/Erie at one point when we went for another border crossing), however, once you learn it's "quirks" it gets easier.

 

I _WILL_ say it's a lot easier to do it on the PC with a program specifically dedicated to mapping out a route _FIRST_ and then load that in, than to try and do it on the handheld.

 

And double check your route.. we discovered pocket query and such on a trip to toronto.. we only realized it _might_ be a bit confused when it took a 500 mile trip and said it was over 3000 miles, but only because it had us doubling back for caches. And I mean, doubling back 200 miles in some cases.

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Looks like it may be the old version of software I am using.
The age is not the issue. City Select could autoroute on Garmin’s GPSV in 2002. What matters is the name and version of the map product. Roads and Recreation never autorouted; Metroguide autorouted up to a certain version (Ver. 4 IIRC), then didn’t in subsequent versions; City Select and City Navigator always autorouted.

 

Also in order to get autorouting on the unit, you have to have to select “Follow Road” in the routing preferences. Press MENU>MENU>Setup>Routing. Set Guidance Method to either Follow Road or Prompted. The latter will ask whether you want Follow Road or Off Road when you activate a route or a Go To. If you don’t select Follow Road, you will get straight line routes, even with an autorouting map product.

 

If you buy CN, buy it on DVD, not the pre-programmed card. If you buy it on the card, you won’t be able to install the maps on your computer, there is no upgrade program (at reduced price) for pre-programmed cards as there is for the DVD version, and if anything happens to the card, you’re out of luck because the file on the card won’t work on any other card, only the one it comes on.

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The thing that irrigates me about Garmin is the cheaper, car systems come with a really good map loaded. But buy the top of the freakin line handheld? No maps. "Oh, you can BUY THEM for another 150$ or so!" *grrr*
Everyone who buys a dedicated automotive unit wants it for road navigation. Not everyone who buys a handheld wants to use it for road navigation. If handhelds came pre-loaded with road maps, the cost of the units would be higher. Then people who didn't want to use them for road navigation would have to pay for something they don’t want. Do you think they should have to that?

 

The reason handhelds are more expensive than many automotive units is that the handhelds meet much higher standards for shock resistance and water resistance.

Edited by roybassist
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The thing that irrigates me about Garmin is the cheaper, car systems come with a really good map loaded. But buy the top of the freakin line handheld? No maps. "Oh, you can BUY THEM for another 150$ or so!" *grrr*
Everyone who buys a dedicated automotive unit wants it for road navigation. Not everyone who buys a handheld wants to use it for road navigation. If handhelds came pre-loaded with road maps, the cost of the units would be higher. Then people who didn't want to use them for road navigation would have to pay for something they don’t want. Do you think they should have to that?

 

The reason handhelds are more expensive than many automotive units is that the handhelds meet much higher standards for shock resistance and water resistance.

 

Honestly, I think the "higher price" is because we are gung-ho about our hobby, and if they made them a grand, we'd still buy em. :)

 

They could EASILY afford to throw the maps in. It's not like they pay-per-map! :huh:

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Auto nav units are designed for one thing. There's no real choice to make about what map set to install, so they automatically come with road maps. However, a handheld unit may be intended for hiking, road navigation, water navigation, etc. So it makes more sense to leave the map selection up to the individual buyer.

 

Dunk both a nüvi 200 and GPX 60CSx in a creek, and you'll see why the nüvi is just $200, maps included.

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The thing that irrigates me about Garmin is the cheaper, car systems come with a really good map loaded. But buy the top of the freakin line handheld? No maps. "Oh, you can BUY THEM for another 150$ or so!" *grrr*
Everyone who buys a dedicated automotive unit wants it for road navigation. Not everyone who buys a handheld wants to use it for road navigation. If handhelds came pre-loaded with road maps, the cost of the units would be higher. Then people who didn't want to use them for road navigation would have to pay for something they don’t want. Do you think they should have to that?

 

The reason handhelds are more expensive than many automotive units is that the handhelds meet much higher standards for shock resistance and water resistance.

 

Honestly, I think the "higher price" is because we are gung-ho about our hobby, and if they made them a grand, we'd still buy em. :D

 

They could EASILY afford to throw the maps in. It's not like they pay-per-map! :grin:

 

There is probably two reasons why the handheld units are so much more expensive than the car units:

 

1) The handhelds are more waterproof and shock proof.

 

2) More car units are sold. More companies make the car units. This means more competition. So prices come down. The handheld units are more of a specialty thing for geocachers and for people who enjoy the outdoors. Everybody seems to be buying the car units.

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It's not like they pay-per-map! :huh:

From everything I've read, they pay a licensing fee to Navteq for every unlock. So they pretty much do pay per map. And I have no doubt that increased cost would show up in the price of the units.

 

In Garmin's case that's exactly right. They obtain their maps from Navteq. They actually tried to buy a mapping company, I can't remember if it was Navteq or the other major one, one was bought up by Nokia early on, the other one got thrown around in a battle between Garmin and Tom Tom. Tom Tom eventually won the battle, but it cost them a few billion more than what they had originally wanted to spend. Garmin did however lock up their mapping contract long term with Navteq, so it isn't like they'll be shut of the mapping biz anytime soon. I think the next battle ground for these companies will be speed and accuracy of delivering updates. Tom Tom has the online service that you can instantly update your maps, but your update comes from almost any clown who claims this is the new road. If Garmin could develop updates on even a monthly basis that are backed by reliable data (ie their vendor or gov't sources) they could get a major leg up on the mapping wars. I looked at the "preview" maps on Garmin's site to see if I wanted to update my City Nav 07 series with the 09 version. My small test is to see if they have the new 4 lane highway that has been opened in stages over the last 2 years. None of that highway showed up on their preview map, so I can't really say I'll be rushing out to get the 09 version, since as far as I can tell they really haven't done much updating in the metro I'm in. Their loss of a hundred bucks or 125, whatever it costs these days.

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