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Guest SKYCOP

TORNADO SIRENS!

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Guest SKYCOP

MY 14 DAUGHTER AND I FOUND THE FIRST OF 3 CACHES WE WERE HOPING TO RECOVER THIS MORNING. AT ABOUT 10AM THE TORNADO SIRENS WENT OFF AND WE WERE ABOUT 1/4 MILE FROM THE VAN. THIS CAME UP WITH VIRTUALLY NO WARNING (LAST TIME I LISTEN TO THE WX CHANNEL WHEN THEY SAY SUNNY SKIES)

WE MADE IT TO THE VAN JUST AS IT STARTED TO POUR. OH WELL, NEXT WEEKEND WE'LL FIND THE OTHER TWO. HERE'S TO WATCHING THE SKY icon_smile.gif

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Guest McIrish

Ok....I think I will stay in California. At least here the ground just shakes, opens up and swallows you whole!!!! eek.gif

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Guest makaio

Personally, I prefer the east coast hurricanes. After 5 years in Oregon, I felt my first earthquake a few months ago and was none to thrilled. At least with hurricanes and tornados you can see/hear them coming and have time to get the heck out of the way icon_smile.gif

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Guest db8tr

Here in Kansas, I always have some manner of noaa weather radio with me if I am going to be in the outdoors for an extended period of time. I have also taken the time to complete a weather spotter training course so that I would know the difference between a garden variety thunderstorm and a tornado producing supercell. I have to admit that I enjoy watching severe weather, so I usually run for the front porch when the rest f the family is running for the basement. One of these days I guess it could catch up to me icon_smile.gif .

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Guest PneumaticDeath

quote:
Originally posted by makaio:

Personally, I prefer the east coast hurricanes. After 5 years in Oregon, I felt my first earthquake a few months ago and was none to thrilled. At least with hurricanes and tornados you can see/hear them coming and have time to get the heck out of the way icon_smile.gif


 

It's funny how fond and territorial people get about their natural disasters. icon_biggrin.gif

 

As a native Californian, I've been through over two dozen earthquakes, from those that you can barely feel, to at least 4 that were better than 6.0 (2 right around 7.0). Most californians I know think of most small to moderate earthquakes a fun, and certainly a good conversation starter. ("Hey, where were you during the '89 quake!", or "What's the strangest thing you have been doing when a quake struck?" I had a friend who was scuba diving, didn't feel a thing and wanted to know what all the excitement was about when he got out of the water. icon_wink.gif

 

-- Mitch

 

[This message has been edited by PneumaticDeath (edited 24 July 2001).]

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Guest Artful Dodger

We are suffering from a ranging stampede here in New York City. The ground shakes, wobbles .............. TOURIST SEASON IN THE BIG APPLE!

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Guest PharoaH

quote:
Originally posted by PneumaticDeath:

It's funny how fond and territorial people get about their natural disasters. icon_biggrin.gif


Just wanted to share a cute story about a similar subject...

A few years ago, I was working as an instructor. My assigned class was a two week long course on basic printers. As usual, we had students from all over the United States. The class got started talking one afternoon in the first week about natural disasters - hurricanes, tornados, earthquakes...

A student from southern California got to teasing us east coast folks about how we just can't take an earthquake. Yes, its true I would hate an earthquake, but this guy went on and on. Turns out, he said they don't get thunderstorms in his area.

Well, being springtime in Georgia, the second week of class we had a real thunderstorm, complete with strong winds and dangerous lightning.

Our classroom was on the corner of the third floor, right at the tree tops. The wind would swirl around the building and shake the trees something aweful. You could hear the branches beating against the windows and the rain pounding against the glass. The lightning was blindingly bright and you could actually feel the thunder in the floor.

Where was our brave earthquake survivor? Nobody knew, he disappeared for two hours that day. I guess he couldn't take the thunderstorm.

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Guest ClayJar

My family seems to attract natural disasters. We lived in Wisconsin and had a few tornadoes. We moved to Washington and Mount Saint Helens blew apart. We moved to Louisiana and it snowed twice in the first couple years (a big deal for down here), and then my oldest sister moved to Florida for college. Well, hurricane Andrew went through right there where she was studying, but they had cancelled classes, so she had come home ahead of the storm... Well, you know what it did? It hopped across Florida and slammed into Louisiana and got her anyway. I'm almost afraid to take a trip through avalanche country. icon_wink.gif

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Guest bob_renner

Come on out to Arizona. It's nice and warm right now and the newly released California Condors could use a good meal. icon_wink.gif

 

Bob

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Guest McIrish

You can tell a Californian on the east coast a mile away. We took our son to Disney World a few years back and it seems we were the only ones standing by the pool at the hotel pointing and cheering at the lightning storm. Finally, a concerned bellman politely asked us to go inside. I am sure he walked away shaking his head thinking "Crazy Californians!" :)

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Guest makaio

Being a transplanted Virnginian, I can attest to the coolness of lightning storms. Usually, when a good one came along, we'd head for the porch and sit back and watch the strikes. We'd even strategically place metal objects in the field across the road to try and draw them closer. We'd pool up some money and whoever's object got hit first won the pot icon_smile.gif

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Guest McIrish

quote:
Originally posted by makaio:

Being a transplanted Virnginian, I can attest to the coolness of lightning storms. Usually, when a good one came along, we'd head for the porch and sit back and watch the strikes. We'd even strategically place metal objects in the field across the road to try and draw them closer. We'd pool up some money and whoever's object got hit first won the pot icon_smile.gif


 

McIrish faints......crazy Oregonians! eek.gif

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Guest jeremy

I never thought about that! Being a transplanted Virginian myself, I just enjoyed watching the strikes and counting the time before you heard the crack.

 

Best part was being in a large field and watching a sheet of rain come your way from a fast moving cloud.

 

Seattle has earthquakes, but not as often, and there's always the constant reminder of Mt. Rainier (volcano) in the distance to the south, or Mt. Baker (volcano) to the north. And rain don't make you melt too much.

 

Mild winters, late summer sunsets, and small population make it a great place to live.

 

Jeremy

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Guest Sluggo

Jeremy said:

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Mild winters, late summer sunsets, and small population make it a great place to live.

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

 

ARE YOU NUTS?.....

 

I kept looking for the smiley face, the wink, the "my brain is scrambled" icon.....

 

If Seattle (Belleview, Issaquah, Somamish, etc. is SMALL POPULATION, then I'm a lightweight (all 330 lbs). When I visit J&M it takes me 35 min to get to I-90 (all 2.1 miles of it).

 

Take a trip to North Dakota or New Mexico, now that's "small population". Sugar and I drove 200+ miles across the Plain of St. Agustine in southern NM and we passed one car and met two. aaaahhhh blissful solitude! icon_wink.gif

 

[This message has been edited by Sluggo (edited 25 July 2001).]

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Guest jeremy

It's all relative. I was comparing it to Virginia.

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Guest makaio

don't know about crazy Oregonian's. I'm a Virgninian who happens to live in Oregon now icon_smile.gif

 

btw, Jeremy - where about in VA are you from? I grew up in Vienna/Herndon/Reston/Leesburg area.

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Guest Cape Cod Cache

Yup, we DO tend to get territorial in our weather fun. Hurricanes tend to be pretty mild by the time they get up here. During Hurricane Bob I was standing in the driveway checking to se if my Zippo lighter REALLY was windproof (it was). Getting hit by lightning on a sailboat was an experience too. the shrouds hummed like powerlines in the fog, stopped and then I heard the louded boom of my life. My hair was standing on end (I had real long hair then ). The small power boats coming in the channel gave us wide berth too. Fortunately the mast was very well grounded and the radio and Loran were not dammaged. Driving in snow around Atlanta was a kick too, I got pulled over, but let go promptly when I showed a Massachusetts license.

As far as caching goes, I'll have to move 3 in case of a good flooding storm.

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Guest Lightning1996YCJP

<< Ahhh,,, Arizona [the northern/central part....forested mountains) is so nice to live in! icon_biggrin.gif Having grown up in Southern Calif, I'm familar with the weather/natural disaster scenerios....well, I guess it's mostly natural stuff like earthquakes, brushfires, mudslides [i survived the 1969/1970 era) or even the Santana winds...but I have to admit I hate the smog and congested traffic worse. Nope....give me the high country anyday! Mile high forested mountains and valleys and the main thing to worry about is our monsoon thunderstorms! [And where to find the next great view for a cache) ~~ "Lightning 1996YCJP" Yavapai Co. Jeep Posse Searchers

"Support Search and Rescue....GET LOST!":eek!

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Guest PharoaH

quote:
Originally posted by Cape Cod Cache:

Driving in snow around Atlanta was a kick too, I got pulled over, but let go promptly when I showed a Massachusetts license.


 

I keep hearing that Georgia closes the roads down if a snowflake drops. Been here 4 years and still waiting for it to happen...

 

White Christmas in Georgia

White_Christmas_in_Georgia.jpg

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Guest nerys3

I happen to live in Tornado Alley and I have yet to see one in person. I did finally get to hear one. Back when the movie Twister came out in fact. My mom was at the theatre with a co-worker, my dad at work and me and my oldest bro at home. My mom came out of the theatre and management told them that they had to stay there because the sirens were going off. There were some younger gals there and one came out of the restroom and her friends told her what was going on and she thought it was a joke because they just saw the movie. I thought this was kinda funny so I thought I would share. Me, everytime it starts to lightning I get excited and run to the door. I even videotape it now that I have a camera. I should be a stormchaser.

 

http://tornadochaser.com

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Guest Texas-Jacksons
It's funny how fond and territorial people get about their natural disasters.

 

I agree! I'm also a native Californian, however I've been transplanted to Tornado Alley with my husband. The saying about seeing a tornado coming? How do they say it here?... Hogwash! You can't see anything coming at night. And if that darn killer is wrapped inside a rain wall... forget it. You're getting golf ball size hail too!

GIVE ME MY EARTHQUAKES! A little booty shakin' is better than hiding in a hole!

 

------------------

Mark and Kimberly Jackson

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Guest Texas-Jacksons

quote:
Originally posted by ClayJar:

My family seems to attract natural disasters. We lived in Wisconsin and had a few tornadoes. We moved to Washington and Mount Saint Helens blew apart. We moved to Louisiana and it snowed twice in the first couple years (a big deal for down here), and then my oldest sister moved to Florida for college. Well, hurricane Andrew went through right there where she was studying, but they had cancelled classes, so she had come home ahead of the storm... Well, you know what it did? It hopped across Florida and slammed into Louisiana and got her anyway. I'm almost afraid to take a trip through avalanche country. icon_wink.gif


 

I think I'd get along fine with your family. I grew up in California. For 10 years the state was in a drought. I moved to Texas and California flooded. Even Reno went under water. I guess because they were so close to where I lived. I've been in Texas for 4 years now. They have also been in a drought for 4 years (here near the pan handle). When I moved from college, the University experienced the worse flooding in 75 years. The first floor of my old dorm had 3 ft of water. Could I be a long lost cousin of yours?

 

 

[This message has been edited by Texas-Jacksons (edited 08 August 2001).]

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Guest T-storm

It was an hour after the storm first hit before I could safely get to my car. The back window was gone, there was water almost up to the bottom of the door frames standing in the floor of the car, and quite a lot in the trunk as well. Every panel on the car had at least one *huge* 1.5" deep pocks and hundreds of lesser ones. The insurance company offered us $8100 on the spot if we let them scrap it out (it was 5 years old, 93K+ miles). Heck of a deal... glad I wasn't out in the open as many were for the annual MayFest celebration!

 

T-storm

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