Jump to content

Daclaren

Members
  • Posts

    18
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Everything posted by Daclaren

  1. Thank you, e-mail sent. I'm interested in learning how to make these as well...they look great!
  2. You're welcome. I should also point out that not all of "us" (Celtic Pagans, Druids, any Pagans for that matter) dress in robes and such, whether performing rituals or not. If I'm up in the mountains, whether for ritual purposes or for caching, you'll most likely see me wearing a t-shirt, BDU pants, hiking boots, and a boonie hat. I don't even own any ritual garb. To each their own. *shrug* As far as this: You probably wouldn't even know if you'd stumbled upon a Pagan ritual. No, that wasn't an insult...it's just a lot less obvious and/or "covert"-looking than most folks think. No blood sacrifices, no weird Blair Witch-esque twig figures hanging from the trees, etc. The most recent group ritual I attended in a local state forest was...a cookout. Yeah, seriously. We had a cookout, hung out and talked for awhile, and then left. We didn't look any more or less out of the ordinary than any of the other folks having cookouts that day. The "ritual" part was mainly about the gathering...getting together with other like minds and exchanging ideas, not having to worry about hiding beliefs, talking about the beauty of nature and the outdoors, etc. That's not to say that all rituals are like that...just that they're usually not freaky or anything like that, and are often not even obvious. Now, as for the KKK member, that probably would've freaked me out as well, especially seeing as how he was in an isolated area like that.
  3. Our list is pretty similar to Greymane's; we also carry things like bug repellant (during "bug season" - heh) and some of those individually-wrapped wet wipes. I take my digital camera along in a separate bag. As for this: I'd definitely recommend Uniball Power Tank pens. These things rock...best pens I've ever used, and I'm a pen "collector" (nice way of saying I have way too many pens). Can't take credit for this find, though; I found out about them after seeing The Puzzler mention them in this post.
  4. This may sound like a stupid question, but are you sure it was a KKK member, and not a Druid? I have no idea if you have practicing Druids in WV, but many Druids (especially if they're trying to stick to the traditions as much as possible) wear white robes for rituals and gatherings. Since Druidry is an earth-centered path, their rituals and/or personal festival celebrations usually take place outdoors, often in the woods or mountains. As a Celtic Pagan (which is closely related to Druidism), that's the first thing that came to mind when I saw the white robe mentioned. More info can be found at this link. A picture of a simple white robe can be found here; a fancier one is at this link. If the person was a Druid, I'd definitely feel safe placing a cache there. If he was a KKK member, I'd check into whether or not there's current activity in the area before placing a cache there. Just my 2 cents.
  5. Though mine isn't solely about caching, I do have several caching-related entries in my blog... Planetary Verbosity Category links are in the sidebar on the right...if you click on the "geocaching" category, it'll show just the caching-related entries. (Why yes, I do have a thing for stating the obvious...thanks for noticing! )
  6. This is what I wear as well, and I love 'em. After walking through streams and snow while wearing them, I can vouch for the fact that they're definitely waterproof. I, too, have the brown ones...didn't see any red ones where I bought mine, but I wouldn't wear red ones anyway. Hubby wears the Ozark Trail boots mentioned by MMACH 5 earlier in the thread; he's never had a problem with them. When we got our boots, we also made sure to invest in some good socks - no cotton, so as to avoid blisters. They've worked so far!
  7. Add another to the southcentral PA list.
  8. Now that we've started caching more and our Magellan 315 has started leading us in circles, we realized it's probably time to upgrade. (Our previous finds were in more open areas, as well as many virts and locationless, so it wasn't as much of a problem as it is now.) Though Garmin's 60cs is tempting, it's out of our price range. We've decided that we'll probably stick with Magellan for now, and we've narrowed our choices down to the Meridian Platinum and the SporTrak Color. Since we rarely use our GPSr for anything other than caching, I wanted to ask for opinions here from people who've used either or both of these units. We like that both of these have the 3-axis compass and are waterproof. The color screen on the ST, while nice, isn't an absolute necessity. (I've also read that it can sometimes be harder to read in bright sunlight.) Same with the SD cards in the MeriPlat, although that option would come in handy if we ever started using it for anything besides caching (which is a possibility). So for anyone who's used either or both of these, what are your likes and dislikes as far as using it for caching? Any other things about either of these units that we should take into consideration when making our decision? Any help would be greatly appreciated.
  9. quote:Originally posted by Trailblazer # 1: but I have recovered several that have been removed except for the 4 concrete bases,is this a find since the data sheet says standpipe?its gone!! but the evidence remains. I have also logged several fire towers that are no longer there but found the Triangulation stations beneath where it once stood,is this the same since the data sheet say's the top of the tower? For the ones where just the bases of the standpipe remain, I would consider that one to be destroyed. If I saw one like that, I wouldn't log it as a find because the marker itself (the standpipe) is gone. Same with the fire tower. If "marker type" says fire tower and the fire tower is gone, it's destroyed (and I wouldn't count it as found). If there is a triangulation station disk where the tower used to be, then most likely the disk has a separate PID and data sheet. I haven't found anything like that yet, but if I did, I'd try to find the correct PID for the disk. I would put a note (and photos) with each one telling what I found. Those are just my opinions on the situations, though. I've seen several differing opinions on examples like the ones listed above. It's up to each person to decide what's right for them when it comes to logging them here at this site (as opposed to logging them at the NGS site, where they have set requirements). quote:Originally posted by Trailblazer # 1: It seems there are always those little gliches eh.... Hehe...little glitches are the name of the game! Without them, life would be one big, monotonous bore. Dac --------- Goodbye twenties, hello minivan.
  10. quote:Originally posted by Trailblazer # 1:And then there are those Which do have the station at the top of the Tank. See: GF0921 Exeter Minicipal Tank. there are several others as well. Thanks...I think you just reinforced the point I was trying to make. Like I said in my last post, there's no actual disk at the top of the standpipe, spire, etc. The one you listed says (emphasis mine), "The station is the center of the top of the tank." (As opposed to having a disk at the center of the top of the tank.) If you can see the tank (and the top from a distance), chances are the center of the top of it is still there. Otherwise, why would you have logged this as a find? I've seen quite a few folks saying that they didn't climb to the top of (for example) the church spire to make sure the benchmark was still there. If the marker type says "church spire," and the correct marker (referred to in the description) is still there and still in the same spot, it can usually be seen and photographed from the ground...no climbing required. I was thinking more along the lines of something like this: FZ1539 The original description says the station is the ball at the top of the spire. In the finder's description, they mention that they couldn't climb to the top to verify the mark, but in their last picture (the setting sun pic) the ball is clearly visible. Isn't that verification enough, without having to climb up to it? (My example was not meant to single out the folks who found it...it was just the first example of this that I found in the gallery today.) I haven't and wouldn't correct someone on something like that anyway, as it's really not a big deal. It's just one of those things that nags at the back of my mind when I see it. I apologize to Criminal for temporarily hijacking the thread, or at least sending it way off on a tangent. As for your (Criminal's) original question, I wouldn't be offended at all if someone corrected me about improperly logging a find. I'd rather do it the right way and would appreciate someone telling me, as opposed to that person just writing me off as ignorant/uneducated. Dac --------- Goodbye twenties, hello minivan.
  11. quote:Originally posted by embra:Since the issue of reference marks came up, let me ask for validation (or correction) of my understanding: the station mark is the find criterion for a triangulation station BM; however, a reference mark itself would constitute a find for a BM consisting solely of the reference mark itself, no? This is a good point, and you're correct. Anyone who's randomly looking through the gallery needs to realize that many of the reference marks (and even azimuth marks) have PIDs which are separate from the triangulation station PID. GABLES, which we found while on vacation in NJ, has separate PIDs for the station disk, each of the two reference marks, and the azimuth mark: Gables station disk Gables RM 4 Gables RM 5 Gables azimuth mark (This one didn't have RM 1-3, just 4 and 5.) I'll be the first to admit that, when I first started out, I came close to logging a few of the combined marks (one PID for station, RM, and AZ MK) before realizing that I hadn't actually found the station, but the stamp on the disk usually gave it away, and I caught my error before logging any of them. The only time I've been tempted to correct someone (but haven't done it) is when I see someone say something to the effect of, "I didn't climb to the top of the standpipe (or church spire, cupola, whatever) to see if the benchmark was in place." I see these quite a bit on non-disk benchmarks. If the marker type says "standpipe" and you see the standpipe in its correct location, that's a find. There is no actual disk at the top of the spire, standpipe, etc. But that's a whole other topic, so I'll stop rambling about it. Dac --------- Goodbye twenties, hello minivan.
  12. Just a thought about the driving age... KS DMV That is all. --------- Goodbye twenties, hello minivan.
  13. Just a thought about the driving age... KS DMV That is all. --------- Goodbye twenties, hello minivan.
  14. We weren't able to get our GPS until June, so we only started using geocaching as a part of homeschooling with this school year. I only wish the weather would cooperate on days when hubby isn't working (since we only have one car)! Due to lack of caches in our area (especially with the new DCNR regulations), we've done a few locationless caches and are concentrating mainly on logging benchmarks. Benchmark hunting covers the same subjects, and the marks far outnumber the caches in our area. Not only that, but we also rarely use our GPS for benchmark hunting, instead relying on maps and the clues given in the descriptions. I made a worksheet for caching (which we haven't yet been able to use) and am considering having my stepsons (16 year old twins) keep a written list and/or journal about the benchmarks we find. They're both quite dyslexic, so they need the writing practice. Does anyone do anything similar to this? It's great to find other homeschoolers involved in geocaching/benchmark hunting! Goodbye twenties, hello minivan.
  15. We weren't able to get our GPS until June, so we only started using geocaching as a part of homeschooling with this school year. I only wish the weather would cooperate on days when hubby isn't working (since we only have one car)! Due to lack of caches in our area (especially with the new DCNR regulations), we've done a few locationless caches and are concentrating mainly on logging benchmarks. Benchmark hunting covers the same subjects, and the marks far outnumber the caches in our area. Not only that, but we also rarely use our GPS for benchmark hunting, instead relying on maps and the clues given in the descriptions. I made a worksheet for caching (which we haven't yet been able to use) and am considering having my stepsons (16 year old twins) keep a written list and/or journal about the benchmarks we find. They're both quite dyslexic, so they need the writing practice. Does anyone do anything similar to this? It's great to find other homeschoolers involved in geocaching/benchmark hunting! Goodbye twenties, hello minivan.
  16. 57 found so far, many others hunted. I keep lists of ones we weren't able to find with hopes of going back later to try again. For ones which have obviously been destroyed (i.e. standpipes that are no longer there), I'm planning to email the borough office to see if I can find any details on when these were destroyed, then log my findings. Since we're in the same area and seem to be hunting circles around each other, I have a feeling I'll be running into gnbrotz or Ghosthunter one of these days while out searching. Goodbye twenties, hello minivan.
  17. 57 found so far, many others hunted. I keep lists of ones we weren't able to find with hopes of going back later to try again. For ones which have obviously been destroyed (i.e. standpipes that are no longer there), I'm planning to email the borough office to see if I can find any details on when these were destroyed, then log my findings. Since we're in the same area and seem to be hunting circles around each other, I have a feeling I'll be running into gnbrotz or Ghosthunter one of these days while out searching. Goodbye twenties, hello minivan.
×
×
  • Create New...