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Slainte

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Everything posted by Slainte

  1. How can I remove gallery pics from one of my cache pages? A recent finder has all but ruined the challenge of the find!
  2. So many good ideas! Thanks to you all. Oh, and yes, there's some Scottish back there somewhere, but the frugality comes from having two daughters in college. Yikes! Anyway, thanks again, and sláinte mhath to you all!
  3. Thanks to all who responded! Now I'm off to download Scottish cache pages. Some nice bagpipe music should help get the job done. Thanks again!
  4. I thought this was a fairly generic, how-to question. Basically, is it possible to geocache without maps installed on your GPS? I will revisit the sites mentioned; thanks for the reminder.
  5. My daughter will spend the rest of the summer at Napier University in Edinburgh, and would like to do some caching while there. However, I'd rather not spend the money on a set of UK maps for her GPS. If she takes the unit and information pages for some Edinburgh sites, she'll be able to locate the coordinates, then use the info pages to locate the caches, won't she? No roads or references, I know. Just trying to save a few dad-bucks here.
  6. Sorry I didn't see this thread months ago when it was relevant. Regardless, if you haven't already come to your senses and run screaming in any direction other than toward teaching, here's my two cents worth. The issues presented by previous posters are spot-on. If you decide to make the leap, however, consider getting involved with what we in California refer to as charter schools. (I believe other states may have different names for them.) These schools are much more autonomous, and the freedom to try new ideas is less mired in red tape than in traditional schools. I've taught for twenty-five years, seven of which have been in a charter. I currently supervise thirty high school seniors, teach art, art history, digital art, and – wait for it – geocaching. These are all custom-built courses that address state standards, but are unique in their specific application to our particular population. There isn't a better time to be had. Check to see what Colorado has that might give you the opportunity to build something truly unique. Have fun!
  7. A friend is heading to Indonesia to visit his son, and he'd like to take along his 60Csx to set some waypoints on the island of Morotai. Short of purchasing Garmin's Asia map set, how might he be able to load a usable (preferably free) reference map onto his gps? Thanks for any suggestions.
  8. Thanks to Nomex in northern California. Taking time out from caching so the rest of us can go out and play; these reviewers must be nuts. Thank heaven they are!
  9. I just got off the phone with Garmin. Very nice folks. However, it seems that as of May first, things, at least as I understood them, have changed a bit. First, when you purchase CN, you are purchasing application to only one GPS, not two as was the situation before. Second, if you already own CN and were planning to use that second unlock for another GPS down the road, you are now out of luck. I had to pay $117 for one unlock code. They were very decent and let me have my second code, as I purchased the software quite recently. Now I have three well-mapped GPSs, but I expected to have a fourth code waiting in the wings. Just thought some of you might be impacted by this, too.
  10. I supervise a high school caching club, and I'd like to provide members who reach goals (100 finds and so forth) with a commemorative coin of some sort. Does anyone have reliable sources for this sort of thing? We can't afford custom coins, but something generic would be fun for the kids. Thanks for your suggestions.
  11. Slainte

    I need help

    OK, here we go. This is how to enter coordinates by hand into a Garmin Legend (Old Blue). Turn the unit on, and push the upper right-hand button until the screen shows a menu item called Mark. Use your thumbstick (joystick) to move to that item, and then push the thumbstick straight down to select. You'll see a screen with a little guy with a flag in the upper field. Use the thumbstick to select the second field down called Location. You should see a set of coordinates there, starting with "N". The "N" is already selected, but you shouldn't have to change it. You'll see a little calculator-like keyboard with numbers and arrows on it. The right-hand arrow at the bottom should be darkened. When you push your thumbstick straight down, you'll notice that the first number to the right of the "N" is now selected. If the coordinates of the cache you're trying to enter start with that number, push the thumbstick straight down again and again until the first number you need to change is highlighted. To change the number you've highlighted, use the thumbstick to navigate up/down/left/right on the little calculator-like keyboard. Let's say the first number you need to change is a three to a four. With the number you want to change (3) highlighted, navigate on the keyboard to the digit you want (4), and then push the thumbstick straight down again. The three should have changed to a four. Just keep repeating this process until all your numbers match the new ones. Here's something to keep in mind: you must use the little arrows (triangles) at the bottom of the keyboard to move the selection cursor in the Location field. If you don't navigate back down to the arrows with the thumbstick each time you want to change a number, you'll keep changing the same number over and over, which isn't all that useful. Once you've changed all the numbers you need to change, navigate down to the bottom of the keyboard and press "OK". You've just entered a new set of coordinates! Don't worry about the Elevation, Distance, and Bearing fields at this point; they'll take care of themselves. Now, you'll probably want to name this set of coordinates using the name or GC number of the cache you're going to look for. Use your thumbstick again to navigate up until the 001 or 002 or whatever is in the name field is highlighted, and push the thumbstick straight down again. Up pops another little keyboard. Use the thumbstick to navigate to and select each letter you want to use to name your set of coordinates. Remember that you onlly have ten spaces, so you may have to abbreviate. Once you're finished, navigate over to the OK key and push your thumbstick straight down again. All you have to do now is hit OK at the bottom of the screen and your new set of coordinates will be entered into your unit's memory. When you're ready to go caching, hit the Find button, choose Waypoints (Caches are special waypoints), choose either Nearest or By Name - whichever you like - and your whole list of coordinates will pop up. Choose the one you want to find, and hit "Goto" at the bottom left corner of your screen. You should be in business. I hope this wasn't too confusing. Obviously,using a software program such as EasyGPS and a data transfer cable is much faster and easier, but it's still good to know how to do this. Have fun!
  12. Slainte

    I need help

    OK, here we go. This is how to enter coordinates by hand into a Garmin Legend (Old Blue). Turn the unit on, and push the upper right-hand button until the screen shows a menu item called Mark. Use your thumbstick (joystick) to move to that item, and then push the thumbstick straight down to select. You'll see a screen with a little guy with a flag in the upper field. Use the thumbstick to select the second field down called Location. You should see a set of coordinates there, starting with "N". The "N" is already selected, but you shouldn't have to change it. You'll see a little calculator-like keyboard with numbers and arrows on it. The right-hand arrow at the bottom should be darkened. When you push your thumbstick straight down, you'll notice that the first number to the right of the "N" is now selected. If the coordinates of the cache you're trying to enter start with that number, push the thumbstick straight down again and again until the first number you need to change is highlighted. To change the number you've highlighted, use the thumbstick to navigate up/down/left/right on the little calculator-like keyboard. Let's say the first number you need to change is a three to a four. With the number you want to change (3) highlighted, navigate on the keyboard to the digit you want (4), and then push the thumbstick straight down again. The three should have changed to a four. Just keep repeating this process until all your numbers match the new ones. Here's something to keep in mind: you must use the little arrows (triangles) at the bottom of the keyboard to move the selection cursor in the Location field. If you don't navigate back down to the arrows with the thumbstick each time you want to change a number, you'll keep changing the same number over and over, which isn't all that useful. Once you've changed all the numbers you need to change, navigate down to the bottom of the keyboard and press "OK". You've just entered a new set of coordinates! Don't worry about the Elevation, Distance, and Bearing fields at this point; they'll take care of themselves. Now, you'll probably want to name this set of coordinates using the name or GC number of the cache you're going to look for. Use your thumbstick again to navigate up until the 001 or 002 or whatever is in the name field is highlighted, and push the thumbstick straight down again. Up pops another little keyboard. Use the thumbstick to navigate to and select each letter you want to use to name your set of coordinates. Remember that you onlly have ten spaces, so you may have to abbreviate. Once you're finished, navigate over to the OK key and push your thumbstick straight down again. All you have to do now is hit OK at the bottom of the screen and your new set of coordinates will be entered into your unit's memory. When you're ready to go caching, hit the Find button, choose Waypoints (Caches are special waypoints), choose either Nearest or By Name - whichever you like - and your whole list of coordinates will pop up. Choose the one you want to find, and hit "Goto" at the bottom left corner of your screen. You should be in business. I hope this wasn't too confusing. Obviously,using a software program such as EasyGPS and a data transfer cable is much faster and easier, but it's still good to know how to do this. Have fun!
  13. Mine gave up just a few days ago. The problem does seem to be heat. Our temperatures have been in the mid eighties, and every time I use the unit, things get pretty gooey. I talked to Garmin today, and they recommended I send it back, and that the turn-around time would be seven to ten days.
  14. Slainte

    I need help

    By numbers do you mean the coordinates? Are you trying to transfer cache information from the website? What make and model GPS are you using? We'll need a bit more specific information before we can help.
  15. You bet. Travel bugs are kind of a game-within-the-game of geocaching. Most, if not all, TB owners want their bugs to travel far and often. Stopping by a known cache and picking up a traveler is perfectly OK. Just be sure to log them correctly on the geocaching website and everyone will be happy. Have fun!
  16. I know my little blue Legend has limited (8mb) of memory, but I'd like to load it with bits of the more detailed maps I purchased for my Legend csx. The process is very straight-forward, but when I get to the final tap, the screen announces that I am about to erase existing data, and am I quite sure I want to do this? What, exactly, am I about to do, and do I want to do it?
  17. Very cool. Fifth graders are so easy to get fired up; you coudn't ask for a better age to introduce geocaching. I work with high schoolers, and they're sometimes hard to convince that something their friends aren't doing might be cool anyway. Sounds like you have a network of schools with programs similar to yours. The possibilities for contests and competitions and other interactions are limitless. Have a great time!
  18. Sounds like you had the best of times. Congratulations on going the extra mile to make things special for your daughter. I'm in the throes of putting together a similar party, but mine will be the eighteenth birthday version. (Interestingly, it probably won't be all that different from yours.)
  19. After reading my personal profile, another cacher contacted me regarding some career-related issues. As a result of that contact, he's changed jobs and is tremendously happy with how things have turned out. Never underestimate the power of connections!
  20. 52,50.20,17. Hmm. That's 139 altogether. You'd think we'd know what we were doing by now!
  21. one eTrex one eTrex Legend cx ten eTrex Legends two 60 csx (soon!)
  22. Cache Advance If GPS units aren't mandatory, take a look at the letterboxing website for some ideas. It's low-tech, cheap, easy to explain, and might really appeal to your age group. Just a thought.
  23. Enthusiasm on a a student's part is enough to get just about any teacher going. Maybe you could compile some printed material from the geocaching website and leave it for your teacher to read at his or her leisure. Be ready to follow up with ideas for application at your school. Maybe sound out some other students who would be willing to work with you; the more of you there are, the harder it will be to ignore you. Hope it goes well!
  24. I think I'll go with the old Legend. The cable is a selling point, as is the base map. The lack of map context on the yellow etrex bothered me, but its simplicity appealed to me. The Legend will be a good compromise. Again, thanks for your collective insight.
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