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Just a Logbook?


Guest bunkerdave
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Guest bunkerdave

I am conducting a little poll. What kind if interest would there be in caches that contained nothing but a logbook? The idea is that while virtual caches have appeal, there is a lot to be said for that last little stretch of the hunt where you are actually looking for the cache box. Also, I enjoy placing (and finding) caches in areas where they are rarely (if ever) found, and it seems a waste to put a bunch of nice stuff on a remote mountain peak where hardly anyone will ever find it, but at the same time, it is preferable to have SOMETHING there to find, to somehow "end" the hunt.

 

If I were to do a cache like this, it would be in a place where the hunt, and the reaching of the cache, would be so satisfying that the memory of it would be far more valuable than anything I could (or would) place in a cache. It would really be more of a letter box, in essence.

 

So what are your thoughts, as geocachers? Would you be more or less likely to hunt such a cache? Personally, I don't really care what is in the caches I find, though I admit I prefer to open a cache an find it well-stocked. I guess it seems to me to be further evidence of the generosity, integrity, and big-heartedness of my geocaching friends.

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Guest Iron Chef

If it's out there and near where I'm heading then you can be sure that I'll visit it whether the box is empty or not, and reguardless I'll be leaving a Spoon. At least that is my attitude. :~) I personally don't put much but a logbook and possibly one small trinket in my caches right now, I prefer it that fellow cachers fill up the stash.

 

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-Iron Chef

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agefive.com/geocache/ ~ Fe-26

Lets Drive Fast and Eat Cheese!

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Guest gstrong1

I would have no problem at all with logbook only caches. The hunt & the opportunity to visit new & enjoyable places is all I'm after. One other thing that I would probably still put in my caches though, is the single use camera.It's great to make up virtual scrapbooks from the photos off the cache cameras. We go back & forth on forums & cache pages with a lot of people & it's neat to be able to put a face with the names. Not to mention the fact that folks will do the darndest things in front of a cache camera. icon_biggrin.gif.

 

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Gary "Gimpy" Strong

Rochester,NY

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Guest gstrong1

I would have no problem at all with logbook only caches. The hunt & the opportunity to visit new & enjoyable places is all I'm after. One other thing that I would probably still put in my caches though, is the single use camera.It's great to make up virtual scrapbooks from the photos off the cache cameras. We go back & forth on forums & cache pages with a lot of people & it's neat to be able to put a face with the names. Not to mention the fact that folks will do the darndest things in front of a cache camera. icon_biggrin.gif.

 

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Gary "Gimpy" Strong

Rochester,NY

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A log only cache is every bit as good to me as a 'treasure' cache. I enjoy looking at the different items left by people, and I enjoy finding unique items to put in caches I find. But I am there for the hunt. The log book is the most important thing in any cache. If some caches don't have trade items it won't reduce my pleasure one bit, if the hunt is good.

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Guest Markwell

I think the only Geocachers you might lose are the under 10 crowd that accompany the fanatic parents. But that wouldn't stop me from hunting the cache by myself. I would however, make sure that you describe the cache on the webpage as being "logbook only."

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Guest Mark Robb

I think a logbook would be fine.... But my kids help determine which ones we will search for and if there was no dime store surprise they may be dissapointed... I wish they would enjoy the surroundings but their mind is on "What's gonna be in the box???".

Either way we have alot of fun

 

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Mark Robb

http://markrobb.com

Magellan Map 330

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I find that the success is in locating a hidden cache, not in what is in the box. I usually dont make a big deal of trading items when I find a cache, I just sign the log book and enjoy the hike home. I placed a cache that has a log book and a photo album of some great hikes I have taken around the country. Since then most people that found have left various trinkets, yet I always seem to hear that people enjoyed the hike, or the photos..not that they were happy with the cache goodies. In short, I would be quite content with log book only caches. Perhaps a camera to snap a few pics too.

 

-macro-

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I agree with all comments that it's not the treasure, but the adventure. I would also echo Markwell's comments that the web page description make it clear that this is a 'log only' cache to keep the treasure hunters from being disappointed.

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I for one would not mind at all that a cache were listed as "log-book only". Its the successful find that turns my crank particularly if it meant a good hike and some imaginative searching in a nice spot. Quite often I have either left a trade item and not taken anything or on occasion left nothing, took nothing usually because I forgot my trader in the car. Also my logbook entry is brief especially if there are other people around who may be curious after I leave so I try to close-up and rehide ASAP. I will be detailed in my website posting though.

 

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Happy Caching, Olar

 

"if you come to a fork in the trail, then take it!"

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Guest bunkerdave

This could be a step toward a solution to cache plundering and inequity in trading contents. Also would increase the number of caches placed, not that there seems to be a shortage.

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Guest Chris Juricich

I'm finding more and more that the contents by and large don't interest me in the slightest-- it's just the search that appeals. And wadr to my fellow cachers, there's usually very little that I'd want!

 

I've been putting in little car window decals of the geocaching logo which have been well-received, insofar as comments on the logbooks would indicate (I'm making no money off these, Jeremy!), and often I'm more interested in simply contributing rather than taking.

 

That being said, I've recently created a cache that's only large enough for a logbook and the geocaching page notice and pencil in any case. A logbook is adequate for me as far as 'treasure' goes. The real treasure, of course, is the adventure of looking.

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Bunkerdave, if you ever get a chance to come up this way, we have a fantastic logbook-only cache. Do a search on "overdue"

 

I now only mess around with Travel Bugs. I'm not advertising here, but when I go to a cache I either drop a Travel Bug in (if I have one) or trade an item for one that I can turn into a Travel Bug. Otherwise I just sign and stamp the logbook ala Letterboxing. I like the idea of grabbing an item and having a task associated with it. It's cool to be part of a bucket gang, so to speak, trying to get the object to its destination.

 

Unfortunately there aren't many other Travel Bugs around at the moment so when one pops up it's a race to go get it before someone else does!

 

Jeremy

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I always seem to chime in when there is an enviromental point to be made, not that I am a fanatic. But keeping cache container sizes to a minimum may help in the perception of the sport by cetain agencies and individuals. Asking a Park representitive about placing a cache with a five gallon bucket in your hand or a small microcache container may make a difference in their response.

 

Here is an example of a microcache I visited last week that still has a trading theme but is very simple and clever.

 

Tiny by Technician

 

Also, there was some talk about having a "Featured caches of the month" in an earlier thread. Having a cache like this and other unique caching ideas featured would benefit other cachers in different areas who might want to do something similar or like the idea or percption of a low impact cache.

 

[This message has been edited by navdog (edited 15 October 2001).]

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Guest geospotter

While I agree that the hunt is the MAIN thing, not the cache, I am constantly amazed at the different types of items people find to put/leave in caches. Afterall, the term 'cache' indicates the storage of 'something'. If all you're looking for is a log book, perhaps 'letterboxing' is more your style. For me, I enjoy the trinkets. They spark my memory of the hunt.

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Guest bunkerdave

I have to admit, some of my interest in doing my caches this way is due to the displeasure I feel when I go to the trouble to put some nice stuff in a cache, and then someone comes with 8 others and they all take something and leave...(insert your junk here). I figure it easier to just leave a logbook in an ammo box and leave it at that. If someone feels compelled to leave something, as many will, then the cache will only get more interesting. I have no shortage of places to hide caches, just not a lot of time or money to spend buying contents. The "true" cachers (you know what I mean) will seek it anyway. It might mean I have to wait a little longer for finders to log it, but that's fine.

 

Just another 2 cents.

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Guest Jerrold21

I also agree that it is the hunt that is my treasure. I do like what Jeremy is doing with these Travelbugs, once enough of them are out in play we might find that all we deal in will be Travelbugs. Treasures with a history log of their own and not a big deal about equal trading, one bug for another. JERRY

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Guest tecmage

Hi Dave,

 

I been plotting a trip to several "logbook only" caches in Southern Illinois. Like so many others, if you lead me somewhere interesting/nice/scenic, a log is good enough for me.

 

Richard

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Guest Lazyboy

I'll say that I would visit a logbook only cache, BUT, I prefer to take something from the cache. I have a little treasure chest that I fill with the goodies I've taken from caches. Call me silly, but I love browsing through my treasure chest.

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Guest Prime Suspect

quote:
Originally posted by bunkerdave:

I am conducting a little poll. What kind if interest would there be in caches that contained nothing but a logbook?


 

Excuse me for stating the obvious, but it's hardly a new idea, since this is what most micro-caches (35mm film can size) are. Someone might put in a coin or pin, but generally there's only enough room for a folded or rolled up piece of paper to serve as a logbook.

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Guest rdwatson78

Logbook only caches are fine. With all of the other stuff I carry (GPS, spare batteries, compass, water, cache printouts, SLR camera and all of the junk it needs, pen in case the cache doesn't have one, etc.) the last thing I need is more stuff to take with me. You need some cheapy stuff like Pez dispensers or toy cars to trade at most caches. If it is a difficult cache with high dollar contents, you need something nice to trade. Specific items for theme caches. Etc, etc, ad nauseum. I gave up on carrying this stuff pretty quickly and my log entry now usually ends with "Took nothing, left nothing, signed the log." I like the hunt and reading other cacher's log entries. I leave relatively long entries in the caches I find, documenting my harrowing journey to the cache and my hopes of finding my way back if I forgot to waypoint the car. I have placed 2 caches so far and the part I liked least was looking for and buying appropriate cache contents. From now on I will probably stick to log only caches. rdw

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Guest bunkerdave

quote:
Originally posted by Prime Suspect:

Excuse me for stating the obvious, but it's hardly a new idea, since this is what most micro-caches (35mm film can size) are. Someone might put in a coin or pin, but generally there's only enough room for a folded or rolled up piece of paper to serve as a logbook.


 

This is true. I guess my thinking is more along the lines of placing caches that *could* hold items if people felt inclined to leave them. Many cachers, myself included, often leave a signature item in most, of not all caches they find, just to indicate they were there and to improve the cache. I also have to admit that I am somewhat weary of hunting film containers, for several reasons, but they are all just personal preference.

 

I really like Jeremy's idea of having a stamp with which to make a personalized mark in the logbook, too. I wonder what that would cost to have one made?

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Guest gstrong1

bunkerdave. Check out www.stampman.com .For $22.00 I had a round self-inking stamp made up with my signature logo. A hiker dude with a walking stick & "Gimpy" alongside. Pricing is different for assorted stamps & all you have to do is e-mail them a jpg. image of anything you want, & they make a real nice stamp. Mines a little bulky, about 2" dia. X 4" long, but thats cuz I opted for the larger one & went for self-inking so I didn't have to screw around carrying along an ink pad. I take it on every hunt & stamp the logbook after my entry instead of having to sign my name. I also use it to personalize the logbook in each cache I place.

 

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Gary "Gimpy" Strong

Rochester,NY

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Stamping has been around a long time with our sister sport, Letterboxing. It would be hard to take credit for that idea.

 

You can also go to a local stamp store with a printout of your stamp design to give them. I just did two stamps for the travel bug and one of the Geocaching logo for generic uses, and it took 5 days to get it done. Make sure to bring the design in on unlined white paper with black ink for your design in the size that you want it. You're charged per square inch, which comes out to be the same price as Gary paid.

 

Moun10bike pointed this out to me after I saw his cool stamp. You can always carve your own but I'm not heavy into arts & crafts.

 

Jeremy

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I wouldn't mind a log book only cache, as long as the hike/sights were worth it. Problem is about 1/2 of our group is under the age of 12 and it would be a severe disapointment. So given a choice between one w/ just a logbook, and one filled with trinkets we'd do the trinket one.

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Now all we need to do is add a stamp to the boxes to stamp your own logbook and we'll all be letterboxing! Make the leap! Go for it!

Having a pad full of stamps of the caches you've visited is much cooler than a simple found:## and easier than keeping track of what tchotchke you got from what cache.

That little stamp image is a great memory jog to remind you of the whole trip you took to find the cache. And little ones tend to like the stamp pictures too.

 

[This message has been edited by Eoghan (edited 16 October 2001).]

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Must admit that I enjoy seeing what others leave behind, and the 10-yr-old would not like the log-only cache. I do like the letterbox stamp idea, though. If I did those alone, K would not begrudge my going out by myself for those...hmmm.

M

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I prefer the logbook and the travelers, last evening I stopped by our local "quickie cache" in hopes of finding a travel bug. No bug was found but it did contain a couple of ketchup packets?? There is just too much junk be left at sites, maybe the Forest Service is correct with their suspicions that caches are abandoned refuse!

It is my hope that the sport emphasizes the recreational search aspect rather a pot of gold treasure hunt.

 

jpjazz

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I like the idea of a log book only cache. The hunt is what i like the best. One use only cameras would be cool. We could take geeky pics of ourselves for the cache placer to develop. I also agree with Markwell and bunkerdaves comments.

Frankly I am tired of opening up cache boxes and finding childrens toys inside.

jonser

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Guest bunkerdave

I like the thought of the caches becoming more "letterbox-ish." Also, I look forward to the travel bugs becoming so prolific that we frequently open caches and find one we can help reach its goal. That would be a lot of fun, and add to the sense of community and the connection we already have with each other.

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we go backpacking on South Manitou Island in Lake Michigan. He believes in "bonding through common crisis" and we do when climbing several hundred foot sand dunes and walking on rock. So when I got into geocaching, I wanted a tough hunt with respect to terrain. But after such a hike, I don't want to spend a lot of time hunting for an almost invisible treasure. I would rather like to easily find a box with just a log book inside.

 

Lou

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Guest bunkerdave

quote:
Originally posted by Lou C:

Gosh bunkerdave, I wish you lived around me somewhere, I'd love to hunt those kind of caches.

Lou


 

We are pretty fortunate in Utah, to have the rugged, remote landscape that we do, and the access to it that is scarce in many other parts of the USA.

 

The vast majority of my hunts have been in the more urban areas, the kind of caches I can drop by after work, or take a short stroll up a mountain trail to hunt. Many of these are quite entertaining in their own right, but not particularly challenging. They show a neat place that someone else thought enough of to share it with others, which I like. I can remember, as I am sure most others can, too, the site and hiding spot of probably every cache I have ever been to once I hear the name of the cache. This makes for interesting conversation at the gatherings we have periodically held.

 

The other caches I have found, the distant minority, required me to actually PLAN a trip to them, or at least to make me WISH I had planned better once the trek got under way. I have probably hidden as many of these as I have hunted, and a friend of mine whom I met through caching, has hidden several more that are as tough or tougher, in terms of sheer effort to get there, as any I have placed. I am not sure, and this sounds arrogant, but I think he places these caches as a PERSONAL challenge to me to go get them. So far he is WAY ahead of me.

 

Anyway, if you ever are out this way, there are numerous caches that will take everything you've got in you. Getting back to the topic, most of these, as far as I know, have really good booty for those who muster the guts to reach them.

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Guest supertech

Great Idea as long as it doesn't replace caching with 'stuff'. I am going to use this Idea on one cache I know I would not be able to place a large cache, but a tiny one might go un-noticed by passersby. I do prefer the trinkets, but there is no reason I would not go just because it's a letterbox sytle cache.

My 10 YrOld dotter definately prefers the trinket caches!!! icon_biggrin.gif

 

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Ken

32.619407 -85.37055

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Guest supertech

Great Idea as long as it doesn't replace caching with 'stuff'. I am going to use this Idea on one cache I know I would not be able to place a large cache, but a tiny one might go un-noticed by passersby. I do prefer the trinkets, but there is no reason I would not go just because it's a letterbox sytle cache.

My 10 YrOld dotter definately prefers the trinket caches!!! icon_biggrin.gif

 

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Ken

32.619407 -85.37055

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Guest bunkerdave

This weekend, I am going to make a stamp to "sign" cache logbooks. It is not as fancy as the rubber stamps, but it is definitely cheaper, and I can clip it to my cache-pack. I have a design all drawn up, so now all I have to do is see if I can carve it. Shouldn't be too hard. Sort of like carving a really small jack o'lantern.

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There have been some posts here that mention letterboxing. Some posts above allude to it being like "trinket-less geocaching" when they say If all you're looking for is a log book, perhaps 'letterboxing' is more your style and Now all we need to do is add a stamp to the boxes to stamp your own logbook and we'll all be letterboxing!.

 

If I am not mistaken, letterboxing does NOT use coordinates at all, thus no GPSR is needed. I tried once to find a letterbox nearby me by going to a web site and getting clues like "Wander about near where the Rapids are in View. In the Huron River there are boulders surrounded by water making nice rapids. Within a few yards of the rapid view overlook you can find another lonely boulder ..." No GPSR needed there.

 

Lou

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Logbook only caches and rubber stamps may be similar to letterboxing but it is still geocaching requiring use of a GPSR. I like the idea of using rubber stamps on a logbook, it adds a personal touch to your entry and is like leaving a signature item behind.

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We would enjoy it just the same without all the trinkets/goodies. The hunt is what it's really all about for us.

 

But I can definitely understand that the people bringing children along benefit from the goodies. When we pick out the toys for a cache, we hope it will make some kid very happy to find. And a parent very happy to be spending the day enjoying the outdoors with their children.

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Guest bunkerdave

I think I may have to buy a bunch of the "Official Logbooks" if I am going to go all the way with this. I did not get my stamp carved this weekend, inasmuch as I hunted 16 caches this weekend. (Only found 12 icon_frown.gif ) Boo Hoo.

 

I ordered one of the logbooks, just to see what they were, and I like them. I am concered that they would get used up quickly, as they only have 64 pages with 2 log spaces each. 128 logs. Depending on the cache, that could get used up pretty quickly. They are of outstanding quality and are the "Rite in the Rain" brand, so they are ideal in those respects.

 

Jeremy: How about some pens?

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Guest bunkerdave

I think I may have to buy a bunch of the "Official Logbooks" if I am going to go all the way with this. I did not get my stamp carved this weekend, inasmuch as I hunted 16 caches this weekend. (Only found 12 icon_frown.gif ) Boo Hoo.

 

I ordered one of the logbooks, just to see what they were, and I like them. I am concered that they would get used up quickly, as they only have 64 pages with 2 log spaces each. 128 logs. Depending on the cache, that could get used up pretty quickly. They are of outstanding quality and are the "Rite in the Rain" brand, so they are ideal in those respects.

 

Jeremy: How about some pens?

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