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Guest mcb

Do you use a compass? If so, what type?

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Guest mcb

Along the same line as the what type of GPS are you using. Lets here what type of compass people are using when hunting for that geocache. If you don't use a compass at all say that too. Make sure you tell us if it is an electronic or traditional. Vista or Summit are appropriate answers also.

 

mcb

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Guest mcb

I use a traditional magnetic Suunto KB-20 hand-bearing compass for all of my hunts.

 

mcb

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Guest jeremy

I have a Brunton compass (8040G I believe), but to be honest I never use it. Instead I have a cheapie REI compass that clips on to my backpack zipper. It's easier to access when I'm on a cache hunt, and I only need to reference it once in a while with my eTrex unit when I'm getting close to a cache.

 

If I did get lost and the batteries died on my GPS unit, I'd certainly take out the Brunton. But when the GPS is humming along I only need a basic direction for north to play.

 

I liked the little REI compass so much I'm going to have some made with the Geocaching logo on it.

 

Jeremy

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Guest tnunnery

I have a Brunton 8700 pocket transit (a bit of overkill and it stays home now) and a Brunton Eclipse 8096. I have only used it once (just for fun) so far while seeking a cache. The 8096 replaced the military lensatic compass I had which is not as indestructible as you might think. The etrex Vista compass is cool as well.

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Guest jeremy

I wanted to add that we went on a cache hunt over the weekend with my wife's new eTrex Legend (I have the original yellow one). After using it I had to refer back to the documentation to make sure it didn't come with an internal compass. It worked so well determining location compared to my yellow eTrex that I thought it had an internal compass after all icon_wink.gif

 

Jeremy

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Guest jeremy

I wanted to add that we went on a cache hunt over the weekend with my wife's new eTrex Legend (I have the original yellow one). After using it I had to refer back to the documentation to make sure it didn't come with an internal compass. It worked so well determining location compared to my yellow eTrex that I thought it had an internal compass after all icon_wink.gif

 

Jeremy

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Guest gstrong1

I also use a suunto KB-20.A great,dependable compass.--Gimpy--

 

------------------

Gary "Gimpy" Strong

Rochester,NY

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Guest bradrobb

I use the Brunton 8096 GPS compass.

 

This compass has the utm scale for 1:25000 and 1:50000 so I can convert the degs mins in my Global 100 and mark the place on my top maps. I bought the CD set with all the Top maps for Southern Ont Can and I print them off on regular size paper for the area I am looking at.

 

See sample at:

 

http://www.geocaching.com/cache/images/2550_400.jpg

 

Brad

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Guest robamy

Of course for backup I use the Brunton (traditional) compass and the way cool internal compass in the eTrex Vista.

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Guest rediguana

Magnetic generic compass for zone 5 - Lower Southern Hemisphere icon_smile.gif Do those of you that live on big continents and travel large distances north/south notice trouble with your compass as you change magnetic zones? Or is the error a small one that changes with distance travelled?

 

Also, has anyone ever had trouble with localised anomalies screwing with your compass readings?

 

Cheers Gavin

 

[This message has been edited by rediguana (edited 19 June 2001).]

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Guest rediguana

Magnetic generic compass for zone 5 - Lower Southern Hemisphere icon_smile.gif Do those of you that live on big continents and travel large distances north/south notice trouble with your compass as you change magnetic zones? Or is the error a small one that changes with distance travelled?

 

Also, has anyone ever had trouble with localised anomalies screwing with your compass readings?

 

Cheers Gavin

 

[This message has been edited by rediguana (edited 19 June 2001).]

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Guest mazda626

I use a Silva Ranger compass which I've had for 25 years. I think that a compass that allows you to set the declination (like the Ranger)is a must since you can then operate in true north mode. After all, grid lines on all maps are true north not magnetic north .

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Guest Hawk-eye

... Well my old military surplus lensatic compass is hard to beat ... but has weight to it. Usually I just pop in my pocket a simple Silva Polaris ... and use that along with the built in in my Vista. Works like a charm

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Guest bob_renner

quote:
Originally posted by mazda626:

...After all, grid lines on all maps are true north not magnetic north .


Check again. The grid lines are all parallel but not all true north. Only the center grid line is true north. The other grid lines start "bending" away from true north as you get farther away from the equator. If you have a mapping program that can display the grid lines on screen, check where two zones come together. Also, if you have a USGS paper topo, check the sets of arrows at the bottom that show a star for true north, an MN for magnetic north, and a GN for grid north. Generally, the grid north and true north are a LOT closer than magnetic north and true north, but they are off by a small amount.

 

I also have a Silva Ranger, and I agree that the settable declination is a nice feature.

 

Bob

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Guest n1niq

I use a Suunto Orienteering model mostly (no model # on it). I've actually used it to find a cache when the foilage blocked reception. It wasn't an accurate method but I took a rough bearing from my GPS well away from the cache and dead reckoned in.

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Guest Maluso

I use an old Silva brass Modern Huntsman from the late 60's. It was my first compass and is still good company.

 

Diane

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Guest Vagabond

I use a polaris from Finland, just like the boy scout type I have nylon line on it and keep it around my neck so its handy sometimes the compass swings slow on my Lowrance 212 so I us it quite a bit

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Guest Exocet

I use Brunton's Nexus compass. I picked it up for USD$8 at a local store. It allows me to set the declination and otherwise works nicely.

 

I've heard a lot of people talking about needleless compasses and such, but the vast majority of caches don't require that level of hardware - IMO.

 

Of course, I'm planning on going after EraSeek's Mt St. Helens cache soon and it's possible that the Nexus, being water-filled, will develop bubbles and become less than ideal. However, for the most part, I'm happy with my simple, cheap and relatively disposable compass.

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Guest CharlieP

I use a Boy Scout orienteering compass, which I borrowed from my son. I also have an old lensamatic, but find that the Boy Scout compass is easier to use with my hands full of GPS and maps, and being able to set the range from the map is also convenient.

 

Charlie P

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Guest jpaquin@frontiernet.net

Silva Ranger 15cl (pretty sure). Do they still make Silva's? They got bought out by one of the other makers right?

 

Jacques Paquin

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Guest Maluso

Silva definitely still makes some excellent compasses. Check out www.silva.se and look under products> premium> compasses.

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Guest rjsteih

I use a Brunton Eclipse 8096 GPS compass. It works best with a topo map, but I like the declination 'set and forget' option for when I'm out walking around.

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Guest ClayJar

Obligatory Princess Bride reference regarding Silva/Suunto/Brunton brand compasses:

 

"Let me 'splain... No, there is too much. Let me sum up."

-- Inigo Montoya

 

[This message has been edited by ClayJar (edited 04 July 2001).]

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Guest n1niq

ss. All worked well but the surplus compasses had the advantage of being able to sight in on an object that was on the right bearing. This makes life easier since you don't need to keep looking at the compass as you walk. This is not as easy to do with the Suunto.

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Guest gstrong1

I have the Suunto KB-20 sightbearing compass & it does a fantastic job.It is put into use on about every cache hunt I go out on & it hasn't failed me yet. icon_biggrin.gif.

 

------------------

Gary "Gimpy" Strong

Rochester,NY

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Guest gstrong1

I have the Suunto KB-20 sightbearing compass & it does a fantastic job.It is put into use on about every cache hunt I go out on & it hasn't failed me yet. icon_biggrin.gif.

 

------------------

Gary "Gimpy" Strong

Rochester,NY

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Guest broek

I use a Recta DP6. It is declination adjustable, but cannot work all over the world, the DP65 can.

I've used it on several occasions during hunting, when the GPS (Garmin eTrex Legend) couldn't get a good fix due to the treecover. I then step back for 30 meters or so and get a bearing. That will generaly do the trick, making me walk right up to the cache. Dead on.

 

Gerard

 

[This message has been edited by broek (edited 22 July 2001).]

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Guest Elwood

vista, and carry a basic silva as a backup

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Guest k2dave

I use a US Diver scuba compass just because I have it - not like I need 500ft underwater capability on a cache hunt (at least none yet). I also have a sunto vector watch w/ and electronic compass but the US Diver one is more accurate.

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Guest sivad

I use the Brunton Eclipse 8099. Have had it for a year now. I take it everywhere. Rely on it more than I do my GPS. That is why it took me forever to get a GPS.

 

------------------

"All that wander are not lost...for they have GPS in hand..

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Guest zilla

All right, I'll jump in here.. I was using my 40 year old Boy Scout Compass , that was probably 30 years old (my Dad's) when I got it.. Poor thing is getting so scratched up you have a hard time reading it, and part of the base is broke off.. In the interest of upgrading I just purchased a Brunton 8067 I believe.. Great compass..

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Guest Havasu Desert Rat

I've used a Silva Ranger for years and really like. But when the new Eclipse came out, I had to have one. Very accurate for taking/reading bearings, and has simultaneous front/back bearings. Reads to 1° and has a magnifier for reading the bearings. Great compass.

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Guest xanthari

I still use my trusty M3 Compass that I got when I was in the Army. Its easy to use, Lensatic, and has Tritium in it so it glows all night long. It really easy to "shoot an azimuth" with this one..little guesswork, makes land-nav less of a hassle when you can pinpoint the tree, hill, or fencepost you need to walk to for your bearing...I have never been a real fan of the "point and walk the bearing" method as it tends to be much less accurate..its much better to stop, shoot your azimuth, walk to that point and shoot again...when you add a gps to that it makes it even easier.

 

X.

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Guest klgraves

Cracker jack prize compass-

just like the one Jodie Foster receives in the movie "Contact"

 

not kidding

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Guest Bob Bowter

Vista, small Suunto clipped to my pack and a Suunto MC-2.

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Guest hoopoe

I am rather new to this. However, I will be using a traditional Brunton compass.

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Guest cliffy

Nothing fancy here......Just an old Silva with an aluminum bezel. Not sure of the model or if they still even make them. icon_smile.gif

silva.jpg

 

[This message has been edited by cliffy (edited 24 July 2001).]

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Guest cliffy

Nothing fancy here......Just an old Silva with an aluminum bezel. Not sure of the model or if they still even make them. icon_smile.gif

silva.jpg

 

[This message has been edited by cliffy (edited 24 July 2001).]

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Guest Clanggedin

I have an eTrex Summit. I love the "Sight-n-Go" feature.

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Guest GrouseTales

I usually carry 2 compasses while in the woods.

 

Main weapon is a Silva Type 15T "The Ranger".

This is a mirror sighted compass.

 

Back up is a Silva Type 7NL. A small light weight compass. Works good for getting a general heading.

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