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San Diego Banter


TrailGators
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Awww c'mon now!  I just climbed up in the tree to get that one!  And you put Ol' harmon with his bum ankle on the hood of your car to get this?!??!

 

Where's the love?

 

BTW, Marty, did you not notice the huge parking lot not 35 ft behind the pole for you to park in?

 

--TT--

TT, it was worse than you think.

 

When $kimmer plowed into the curb I was sitting in the back seat of the Wrangler. The collision vaulted me up over the front seat and windshield and onto the hood. I did a full pike and landed on my poor ol' tender feet.

 

Figured that I might as well snag the container since I was already on the hood of the Wrangler. I'm just thankful that I didn't wind up in the tree like you did.

 

Harmon

Sounds like a story that could be proven with Photoshop! :ph34r:

Speaking of which...when's our next Photoshop lesson, Harmon? :rolleyes:

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When's our next Photoshop lesson, Harmon?  :rolleyes:

What aspect of PhotoShop would you like a lesson on? Anybody?

 

How about this? (Just for you Jess.)

a183b0b0-701a-4aaf-9c82-ef41981b82b3.jpg

As a challenge or as a lesson, either way. If as a challenge then make sure to use a layer mask for the subject.

 

Love those vine-ripened women. Yowzah!

Edited by SD Rowdies
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When's our next Photoshop lesson, Harmon?  :rolleyes:

What aspect of PhotoShop would you like a lesson on? Anybody?

How 'bout some tips on how to remove items from a photo and adding new ones in?

I seem to have a tough time doing that!

Here's a good example from worth1000.com:

65051398-3d04-4c7d-9280-d3a1f474aa42.jpg

Edit: Just to clarify, this is fairly easy to do if the new item is larger than the old one, but if it is not like the one shown above then you have to reproduce the missing/hidden background. That is the part that I have trouble with!

Edited by TrailGators
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When's our next Photoshop lesson, Harmon?  :rolleyes:

What aspect of PhotoShop would you like a lesson on? Anybody?

How 'bout some tips on how to remove items from a photo and adding new ones in?

I seem to have a tough time doing that!

Here's a good example from worth1000.com:

65051398-3d04-4c7d-9280-d3a1f474aa42.jpg

Edit: Just to clarify, this is fairly easy to do if the new item is larger than the old one, but if it is not like the one shown above then you have to reproduce the missing/hidden background. That is the part that I have trouble with!

O.K., here we go.

 

A. Open the roper image and duplicate the background layer. Name the Background Copy layer "Rodeo."

 

B. Select the Rodeo layer and use your favorite selection tool to select the dolphin but not the rope that crosses in front of the dolphin. You don't need to be especially careful with this selection except for the rope. Make sure to save this selection at "Select/Save Selection." Name it "Rope."

 

C. At the bottom of the layer pallete click "Add layer mask." You should see a layer-mask thumbnail appear on the Dolphin layer.

 

D. Select the original Background layer and then duplicate the Background layer once more. Click the Background eyeball icon to make the original Background layer invisible.

 

E. Select the Dolphin layer and select the Clone Stamp tool. Set the Clone Stamp tool diameter to about 40.

 

F. Carefully align the Alt-Click clone-stamp tool crosshair at the juncture between the arena dirt and the dark shadow-line just left of the horse's right forefoot. Now paint some dirt over the lower half of the masked dolphin image. Note that the Clone Stamp tool will be confined to the layer mask that was derived from your dolphin selection in step B above.

 

G. Carefully Alt-Click the clone-stamp tool crosshair at the upper-left end of the "Outdoor" banner that's on the corral fencing. Now paint over the top quarter of the dolphin mask. Repeat this step a couple of times to paint a complete banner over the upper half of the masked dolphin area.

 

H. Keep messing around with this process until the cloned area looks reasonable. Note that the banner reads "OutdoorOutdoorOutdoor." Reduce the diameter of the Clone Stamp tool and fiddle with the undesirable artifacts of the banner.

 

Note: The banner text can be replaced as desired bu mapping new text onto the surface of the banner. That's another exercise.

 

I. Another thing worth doing is to place the replacement object on a layer above the masked-dolphin layer and set the replacement-object layer opacity low enough to reveal the underlying dolphin image. This approach will reduce the work of cloning because some of the dolphin image will be masked by the new subject image.

 

J. Add a new layer above the new-subject layer, click "Select/Load Selection," and choose "Rope." Now use the Eraser tool to erase everything but the rope so's it seems to appear across the new subject.

 

K. With the rope-layer selected choose "Layer/Matting/Defringe" and set the defringe Width to 1-pixel before clicking OK. Do the same for the new subject layer.

 

L. Save the image as you wish; either as a .psd file or as a .jpg file.

 

There's a few other things worth doing with this exercise but they don't relate so much to your question Pat. With PhotoShop there's lots of ways to skin the same old cat so don't think that I've put you onto the right-and-proper way to do this exercise.

 

Keep at it and take advantage of the Adobe.com and 1000.com tutorials. There will be a couple of shelves of good PhotoShop CS2 books at any recognized bookstrore whether online or at the mall. Remember, you spend and it helps the economy I've heard.

 

Comprende?

 

Harmon

Edited by SD Rowdies
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How's this?  :rolleyes:

157019e6-1dc1-4611-9927-65b74b2043a3.jpg

Actually I did the above using Elements a different (harder way).

I'll try it again your easier way when I get home and have access to CS1!

Good on y', Pat, nice job. Why the heck am I trying to give you lessons?

 

When you get to this stage start using the clone-stamp tool to eliminate some of the repetitious stuff that results from cloning out of the same area. Just shove some of the soil over the repetitious dirt clods here and there.

 

Did you notice that the horse is doing a one-hand stand? Being roped and tied reminds me of the seventies for some reason.

 

So do I get to score the roper Geocache?

Edited by SD Rowdies
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How's this?  :rolleyes:

157019e6-1dc1-4611-9927-65b74b2043a3.jpg

Actually I did the above using Elements a different (harder way).

I'll try it again your easier way when I get home and have access to CS1!

Good on y', Pat, nice job. Why the heck am I trying to give you lessons?

 

So do I get to score the roper Geocache?

Harmon, I did say "tips"! I didn't know about that clone thing so I'm definitely going to check that out! There are a lot of ways to skin a cat but you always know the most effficient way! Thanks! :unsure:

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How's this?  :rolleyes:

157019e6-1dc1-4611-9927-65b74b2043a3.jpg

Actually I did the above using Elements a different (harder way).

I'll try it again your easier way when I get home and have access to CS1!

Good on y', Pat, nice job. Why the heck am I trying to give you lessons?

 

So do I get to score the roper Geocache?

Harmon, I did say "tips"! I didn't know about that clone thing so I'm definitely going to check that out! There are a lot of ways to skin a cat but you always know the most effficient way! Thanks! :unsure:

Aw shucks, I'm so embarrased.

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672a7785-0716-40b2-8d20-4a12e31aaf5b.jpg

That looks like a scene from "Ghost". Now I'm gonna have nightmares. :o

Makes sense. When y' get down to it we're nothing but a bunch of vibrating strings. For a very few of us the strings are arranged in the most-pleasant way.

Uhhh...Harmon, one thing you should know before this goes any further <_< :

 

I can't bake! :o

 

~Jess

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672a7785-0716-40b2-8d20-4a12e31aaf5b.jpg

That looks like a scene from "Ghost". Now I'm gonna have nightmares. :o

Makes sense. When y' get down to it we're nothing but a bunch of vibrating strings. For a very few of us the strings are arranged in the most-pleasant way.

Uhhh...Harmon, one thing you should know before this goes any further <_< :

 

I can't bake! :o

 

~Jess

Rats! there goes my last hope. Guess I'll have to break out my old Betty Crocker cookbook.

 

Well said, Jess, well said.

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Harmon, I tried that cloning technique on you and look what happened!!! <_<

Why ... I oughta!

 

I'm just glad that I wasn't wearing high-water shorts.

 

Actually I do believe that I look much younger in your masterpiece. People always said that I have my mother's nose. On the other had it seems that I lost my remaining hair. Thanks a lot ol' pal.

 

One thing worth knowing is that you can open two or more images in PhotoShop and clone directly from any one into any other.

 

Harmon

Edited by SD Rowdies
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Harmon, I tried that cloning technique on you and look what happened!!! <_<

Why ... I oughta!

 

I'm just glad that I wasn't wearing high-water shorts.

 

Actually I do believe that I look much younger in your masterpiece. Thanks a lot ol' pal.

 

Harmon

Sorry about that Harmon! :o But seriously, I am working on "Lesson 6 - Cloning" now! I'll also integrate the drop shadow technique into my new masterpiece as well (Lesson 5)! You'll be happy to know that I have chosen a new victim!

Edited by TrailGators
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Harmon, I tried that cloning technique on you and look what happened!!! <_<

Why ... I oughta!

 

I'm just glad that I wasn't wearing high-water shorts.

 

Actually I do believe that I look much younger in your masterpiece. Thanks a lot ol' pal.

 

Harmon

Sorry about that Harmon! :o But seriously, I am working on "Lesson 6- Cloning" now! I'll also the drop shadow technique as well!

Hey, the rule for San Diego Banter thread is never be sorry. Well, except for me that is.

 

Your skill is growing day by day. The neat thing is that your daughter is learning as well. I love being helpful in this regard 'cause it may cancel out a few of my faults when St. Peter starts thumbing through my chapter if his big book.

 

I am anxious for you to learn cast-shadow as opposed to drop shadow. Cast shadow is way more effective for adding image elements realistically. After that then reconstructed shadows is the next step for those troublesome lighting situations when a really good result is needed.

 

A good cast-shadow exercise would be to take that Three Amigos shot from above and place it on a larger Forum-gray background, then develop a cast shadow behind the Amigos. That way the cast shadows would spill out onto the Forum background somehwat like an out-of-frame image.

 

Harmon

Edited by SD Rowdies
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I'm sure that St. Peter will give you a fully stocked Photoshop lab! I've heard that You-Know-Who has quite the sense of humor! <_< Anyhow, I have a feeling that I wouldn't be wearing goofy pants pulled up to my neck and white socks pulled up to my knees in those misprints had I not picked on you guys a few too many times! :o I still think that one misprint should have had a background of the Swiss Alps and one of those 10 foot horns they blow on!

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I'm sure that St. Peter will give you a fully stocked Photoshop lab! I've heard that You-Know-Who has quite the sense of humor! <_< Anyhow, I have a feeling that I wouldn't be wearing goofy pants pulled up to my neck and white socks pulled up to my knees in those misprints had I not picked on you guys a few too many times! :o I still think that one misprint should have had a background of the Swiss Alps and one of those 10 foot horns they blow on!

Harmon, maybe I missed it but where's the step where you add the subject above?

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Harmon, maybe I missed it but where's the step where you add the subject above?

I guess you mean the subject of cast shadows. Actually I once suggested cast shadows as an exercise but saw no interest.

ee8daf45-fd78-41d8-ba75-afbf70a938d2.jpg

This image is interesting in that the substitute faces are lighted from three different directions. Of course that's another problem that can be fixed with PhotoShop when excellent results are wanted. This is where the tedium really sets in and it isn't an exercise for an impatient person.

 

Just to make a point this image includes a tiny bit of drop-shadow as well as a cast shadow. Notice that a drop shadow from ostensibly overhead lighting is annoying in that it makes the image fuzzy instead of sharp. Very unnatural in my view what with my close-set eyes, my huge ears, and my big flappy lips from a previous image. Perhaps I should contact TT and see if I can borrow his New Jersey eyeglasses.

Edited by SD Rowdies
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I guess you mean the subject of cast shadows.

Actually, that not what I meant but I needed to know that stuff too and I was interested before but maybe I forgot to respond. Anyhow, what I meant was you never including the step where we add the victim in place of the dolphin! :)

we were all interested.....just a bit late on the assignment

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Here's my attempt.

 

amigoscast.jpg

Super job on a cast shadow QDman. I'm always sure that you are out there reading the posts.

 

My personal preference is to lighten a shadow substantially, first with the "Foreground-to-Transparent" Gradient tool applied to the shadow layer and then by decreasing the shadow-layer opacity.

 

In the end I apply a progressive Gaussian blur to the shadow in order to fade away the sharply defined shadow-edges more and more toward the shadow extremity.

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I guess you mean the subject of cast shadows.

Actually, that not what I meant but I needed to know that stuff too and I was interested before but maybe I forgot to respond. Anyhow, what I meant was you never including the step where we add the victim in place of the dolphin! :)

Yeah, sure, like I never suspected that I might be a victim?

 

Anyway, that was sorta like Step I and J.

Edited by SD Rowdies
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By the way, there's two small details on the YMS #19 card that don't show up in the small layout. Well, you know, besides the hedge clippers tucked into TrailGators stylish belt.

bb65c555-7530-47fa-81f5-98b3e02a75cd.jpg

 

1fae5a91-16ac-4339-867f-0f53316e2815.jpg

 

Of course there's a story that goes with the details.

Edited by SD Rowdies
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Harmon, I bet you'd like one of those Tyrolean's too! :)

 

That clone tool is very cool! The one problem I had was I didn't quite get the entire image the first time I used it, so I went back to clone the piece I missed but it didn't line up. So I got a double image. I solved that problem by simply re-cloning the entire image again. But cloning between two adjacent images is very easy to do! After you clone you touch up the edges with the eraser tool and voila!

 

BTW, the aspect ratio on that card is incorrect. but I didn't know how to crop the top of the image so I left it. How do you crop images?

Edited by TrailGators
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Harmon, I bet you'd like one of those Tyrolean's too! :anibad:

 

That clone tool is very cool! The one problem I had was I didn't quite get the entire image the first time I used it, so I went back to clone the piece I missed but it didn't line up. So I got a double image. I solved that problem by simply re-cloning the entire image again. But cloning between two adjacent images is very easy to do! After you clone you touch up the edges with the eraser tool and voila!

 

BTW, the aspect ratio on that card is incorrect. but I didn't know how to crop the top of the image so I left it. How do you crop images?

In this case I'm speculating that you might be asking about changing an aspect ratio. Then again, probably not.

 

Of course you can simpy use "Image/Image Size" and uncheck the "Constrain Proportions" box. Problem with this approach is that the image will be either squashed or stretched in one dimension to fit the change in either width or height. Not good at all unless you're making fun of somebody. As you know, we never, ever do that on this thread.

 

Cropping is done with the crop tool from the toolbar. Choose the Crop tool, Click & Drag a rectangular area within an image, and then double-click within the selected bright, rectangular area.

 

Another approach is to add width or height to the image using "Image/Canvas Size," check the "Relative" check-box, and set the width and height units to "Inches." In this case you'll have to decide what color should be used to fill the added areas. Actually this approach could possibly be useful for YMS cards because of the card-frame that Flag Man places over the image; that is, one might possibly benefit from adding a bit of width or height that would lie underneath the frame in one dimension but not underneath the frame in the other dimension. That way Flag Man would have a bit more latitude (Or is that longitude?) in placing the frame. Then again, maybe not. It would be much easier to blame a bad result on Flag Man.

 

Related to this discussion is the subject of layer masking, saving selections, and layering in general to make things much less difficult when composing layouts. Also layering allows one to conveniently produce and preserve multiple versions of a layout.

 

Do you recall how quickly I was able to retract the misprint features from the YMS #19 card? It was ever-so easy because each and every element of the layout was on a separate layer; the top protion of your breeches on a layer, each sock on a separate layer, the belt was actually on two separate layers, the clippers on a layer, the blood on a layer, and so on. If an image is properly layered then variant, Gecko, versions are just a "click, click, click" and a "Save As" away.

 

Understanding PhotoShop layering is probably the most important fundamental to grasp.

 

Good gosh, just listen to me, mister expert huh?

 

Sorry,

Harmon

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Here's my attempt.

 

amigoscast.jpg

Super job on a cast shadow QDman. I'm always sure that you are out there reading the posts.

 

My personal preference is to lighten a shadow substantially, first with the "Foreground-to-Transparent" Gradient tool applied to the shadow layer and then by decreasing the shadow-layer opacity.

 

In the end I apply a progressive Gaussian blur to the shadow in order to fade away the sharply defined shadow-edges more and more toward the shadow extremity.

I just used the Blur tool. I like the Gaussian idea. Thanks.

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Banter about PhotoShop Cast Shadows

 

Criteria

 

If you look carefully at a cast shadow it is usually light and transparent, blurry due to reflected light falling into the shadowed area from secondary sources, and not at all without color. To appreciate these attributes do go outside and study shadows in the real world and in different lighting conditions. You will see variations of these basic attributes depending on time of day, cloudiness, nearby reflective surfaces of various colors, and so on.

 

In fact a cast shadow becomes lighter, more transparent, and increasingly blurred toward the far end. The texture and form of the surface on which a cast-shadow falls is most-often quite visible. It is rare when a cast shadow is very dark and opaque to the extent that surface details are lost. So there, in a nutshell, is the general description of a believable cast shadow in the realm of PhotoShop graphic art.

 

For completeness do acknowledge the trivial but true fact that a cast shadow takes the general form of a shadowed subject except that it is altered in a geometrically complex way by the impingement angle of the primary light source that illuminates the shadowed subject. Worse yet there are often multiple complex shadows due to multiple light sources.

 

Summary: Light, transparent, progressively blurred, underlying surface details visible, not without color, takes the geometrically foreshortened or lengthened form of the shadowed subject.

 

The good news is that recent versions of PhotoShop provide all the tools needed to easily produce a cast shadow that meets the first four of the criteria in the above summary.

 

Before you ask, yes indeed, PhotoShop also provides what is needed to handle the complex issues inherent in the fifth summarized criteria, but not easily. Think of the fifth criteria as a graphic-arts version of a TucsonThompsen mystery puzzle that you can achieve with wit, wisdom, and the usual cell-phone or, in this case, Banter-Forum lifeline.

 

However, in the interest of time and patience there is an easy, let’s say simplified way to foreshorten and lengthen a cast shadow but it lacks the geometric niceties of pedantic realism. This scope of this exercise will be confined to a simplified method that will achieve a pleasing though not entirely realistic result.

 

Exercise

 

A. Save and open the “Three Amigos” image provided below. Note that this image has far more working area that the image seen in previous Banter posts.

 

B. Click the Magic Wand tool and then click each and every gray area of the image including between and under arms and legs. That should be seven clicks. Note that the selection marquee outlines all gray areas.

 

C. From the Menu bar choose “Select/Inverse.” Note that the selection marquee now outlines only the images of the Three Amigos.

 

D. Make sure that the Layer Palette is extended so that you can see the “Background” layer. Now select “”Layer/New/Layer Via Copy.” Note that a new layer named “Layer 1”appears. Make the Background layer invisible by clicking the Eyeball Icon of the “Background” layer. Notice that the background of “Layer 1” is completely transparent.

 

E. Use the “Magic Wand” tool to as you did in Step B and Step C except, this time, do so for the image on “Layer 1.” Make sure to choose “Select/Inverse” after the seven clicks. Now press the ‘D’ key to set foreground color to black.

 

F. On the toolbar, click on the “Gradient” tool. Note that the “Gradient” tool might be hiding behind the “Paint Bucket” tool. On the “Options” bar above the working image, click the tiny triangle beside the gradient preview window to activate the gradient-preview palette. Click the other tiny triangle of the gradient-presets list to activate the gradient-presets palette. From the presets pallet choose “Short List.” From the “Gradient Preview” list, choose preset “Foreground to Transparent.” Wasn’t that fun?

 

G. With “Layer 1” selected on the layer palette click the “Create a new layer” icon at the bottom of the Layer Palette. Note that “Layer 2” appears and is selected. Now click-and-drag the “Gradient” tool crosshair from just below the boots to just above the hat crown of the “Three Amigos” image. When you release the mouse button you should notice that the image darkens in gradient fashion from top to bottom. To appreciate the change click the Eyeball icons of the “Background” layer and the “Layer 1” layer to make them invisible. You should see a gradient shadow that fades from very dark at the bottom to transparent near the top of the image selection.

 

H. Click “Select/Deselect” to do away with the working selection. Click the Eyeball icon to make “Layer 1” visible once again but leave the “Background” layer invisible. Now realize that the gradient shadow that you produced is in fact on a higher layer; that is, in front of the “Three amigos” layer. Not good. So click-and-drag “Layer 2” down so that it is situated between “Layer 1” and the “Background” layer. Note that the dividing line between “Layer 1” and the “Background” layer change appearance when “Layer 2” reaches the ideal position for you to release the mouse button. Now the shadow is under the image of the three subjects. Of course it is hidden from view behind the subjects and is identical in size and shape to the subject images.

 

I. With “Layer 2” still selected, from the Menu Bar choose “Edit/Transform/Distort.” Note that the Distort outline now seems to surround the subject images; but no, don’t forget that you selected “Layer 2” and so the Distort outline actually surrounds only the shadow image.

 

J. At the top-center of the Distort outline click-and drag the distortion handle all the way down to the frilly cuff of TucsonThompsen’s left sleeve. Note with pleasure that the shadow follows the drag and recedes in perspective behind the subject image. For a slight hint of geometric distortion click and drag the upper-left and upper-right distortion handles a short distance inward toward the upper-central handle of the distortion outline. Not too much. On the “Options” bar click the big “Commit Transform” check-mark to fully commit these distortion settings.

 

K. Click the Opacity triangle for “Layer 2” of the Layer Palette and move the slider left to a value of about 65%. Not that the shadow becomes more transparent, especially near the lower end near the boots. Believable shadows have mid-range Opacity settings.

 

L. Click the Eyeball icon to make the “Background” layer visible once again. You’ll find that your cast shadow is pretty darned decent but what essential criteria have we neglected? Yes, progressive blurring, visibility of the underlying surface texture, and coloration right? Don’t give up now, take time to explore the three remaining issues.

 

M. With the shadow layer, “Layer 2,” selected choose the “Rectangular Marquee” tool from the toolbar. From just above the upper-left corner of the overall image, click-and drag a rectangular marquee over the upper portion of the image down to the point in the shadow that defines the bottom of TT’s big sombrero. That is, from top of the image down to the height of TT’s huge holstered pistolero and all the way across the width of the image.

 

N. From the Menu Bar select “Filter/Blur/Gaussian Blur.” Set the “Radius” slider to 1.5 and then click “OK.” Now use the down arrow of your keyboard to slide the rectangular marquee further down to knee-level in the image. Repeat the Gaussian blur procedure just as before. Repeat this procedure twice more, once with the bottom of the Rectangular Marquee at mid-calf level and finally with the bottom of the Rectangular Marquee just at the soles of the boots. You should see that the first three of our defining criteria are now met, the shadow is light, transparent, and progressively blurred. Now deselect the Rectangular Marquee by choosing “Select/Deselect.”

 

O. Consider now the issue of demonstrating that surface texture can be seen through the shadow. Select the “Background” layer once again. Refer only to Step B above and use the Magic Wand tool to reselect all seven gray areas of the “Three Amigos” image area.

 

P. On the Menu Bar select “Filter/Texture/Texturizer” to activate the Texturizer window. In the central pane select “Texture/Craquelure.” Then set “Crack Spacing = 5, Crack Depth = 1, and Crack Brightness = 1.” Click “OK” and note that the “Craguelure” surface texture is quite visible right through the cast shadow. That then satisfies the forth of our summarized shadow criteria including lightness, transparency, progressive blurring, and surface-texture visibility. Good, yes?

 

Q. With the “Background” layer selected in the fashion of Step B above, double-click the “Foreground Color” square of the toolbar and set “R=234, G=225, and B=217.” Click “OK” and then select the “Paint Bucket” tool. Click all of the gray areas of the "Background" layer with the Paint Bucket tool crosshair. Note that the background is now tinted to a faint pink-orange color. In this lucky instance note that the shadows reveal a very small hint of the pinkish tone of the underlying layer. In truth it is simply the presence of the pinkish surrounding area that tricks an eye into seeing a pinkish tone within the shadows. By making the “Background” layer and “Layer 1” invisible one can see that the shadow image has no pinkish color tone whatever. Perhaps in real-life our eyes are influenced to see shadow tints in the same way.

 

R. The task is left to the reader to add a slight pinkish tint to the shadow image.

 

NOTE: What remains in this exercise is for the author to proof-read and retest the instructions. I’ll do so in due time and post a notice that corrections and changes have been made. I'm going to bed now.

 

Changes: Good morning, I have indeed reread these instructions and have made a few corrections and additions. Please tell me, why am I doing this?

 

7ecfb5cc-7f86-4bf5-b146-64e35cf0b93d.jpg

Edited by SD Rowdies
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ee56e5d3-4702-46eb-83cb-e1c35165a79c.jpg

That must be one of those Swiss Cheese makers! :laughing:

Also a great hole punch for a 4-ring binder. Trouble is it takes a whole lot of wind t' operate it.

 

That suggests a question - "Who's the windiest Geocacher in town?" Well, you know, besides Passing Wind.

 

O look, it's a brown cow. Do you know why brown cows give more milk than black cows?

Edited by SD Rowdies
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