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RocketMan,

 

At your request, Dave, here’s a few observations about vacationing in Maui, Hawaii based upon our limited personal experience. We were there only one week but relied on the extensive experience of our special friends Dave and Bonnie of Clari-netacache. Without Dave and Bonnie we would have seen only half of the Maui sights that we did.

 

Best Guidebook: “Maui Revealed – The Ultimate Guidebook,” Andrew Doughty, Wizard Publications, Inc.

 

Best Accommodations: Establish an enduring friendship with somebody that owns a time-share condo anywhere on Maui and then freeload on them as much as you can.

 

Airline: We used Aloha Airline because they offer direct flight between Maui and San Diego. The usual misery of five hours canned up with screaming babies, tattooed twits, and inconsiderate adults can be expected. Go first class if you’ve got the bucks.

 

Best Transportation: Share your friend's rental vehicle or rent a Jeep rather than a Chrysler Sebring convertible, you know, unless you are fifty-five or over with a gold neck-chain, a fifty-dollar haircut, golf clubs, and a trophy wife. Uh-oh, you do have a trophy wife don’t you Dave? Sorry.

 

Hi Lisa! Lisa dear you’re such a lovely woman and you deserve the best.

 

Best Places to Eat: Charley’s in Makawao and Grandma’s Coffee Shop in Keokea. Of course your trophy wife may have other ideas. Charley’s is basically a local-hangout bar and hamburger joint once visited by Willie Nelson so they say. Willie owns water front property in Maui so they say. “On th’ road-ag'in ….”

 

Places to Avoid: Any and all of the Disneyesque resorts. The whole resort deal is tattooed twits in bikinis by the pool, expensive shopping, and transplanted palm trees. (See trophy-wife comments above.)

 

By the way, don’t let Trailgators know about the tattooed twits in bikinis.

 

Best Things to Do:

 

A. Drive the entire perimeter of Maui using the coastal roads. The rental Jeep will assure passage along the southern flank of Haleakala. All of the paved roads are just fine and very scenic. The unpaved section south of Haleakala ain’t all that bad either; easy Jeeping.

 

B. Sea-kayak and snorkeling outing from D.T. Fleming Beach Park to offshore near Slaughterhouse Beach. Outing includes double sit-upon sea kayak, personal flotation device, snorkeling mask and fins, and an informed guide at $80.00 per person. Through the surf, through a short shoreline passage, and two opportunities to snorkel amongst the coral and tropical fish. Drive to the start at the park.

 

C. Drive to summit of Haleakala Crater. There’s improved hiking and biking trails into the huge and colorful caldera and thence all the way down the ridgeline. Horseback rides into the caldera are available for small groups of four or five at about $150.00 per person. Incomparable scenery and when the clouds clear you can see southward all the way to the big island. Park service fee except for Golden Age passes. Coasting down Haleakala road on a bicycle seemed really dumb to us. They make you ride in a bunched-up group and wear traffic-safety outerwear. It is possible to mountain bike alone down the Haleakala ridgeline if you rent a bike and can arrange transportation for both ends of the ride.

 

D. Road to Hana and definitely beyond is a must-do for several reasons such as the shoreline scenery, Black Sand Beach, attractive water falls and pools, Seven Pools, and most importantly the 1.8 mile hike through Bamboo Forest and thence to Waimoku Falls. Low water in the streams and pools while we were there but should be great in March.

 

E. Highway 340 from Lahaina to Kahului to see the shoreline sights and to stop to buy banana bread and to eat your picnic lunch at picnic tables behind the chapel in Kahakuloa Village. Generally pack a picnic lunch for all outings because it’s hard to find food service in rural areas. Eat Hawaii Gold pineapple every chance you get.

 

F. ‘Ioa Valley. Takes only a couple of hours but its a good way to start right after you get off of the early flight. You get to watch local guys leap twenty feet from a footbridge into a shallow pool; you know, like Passing Wind would do.

 

G. Kula Botanical Garden is extremely informative and delightful. Go early and then ask directions for Grandma’s Coffee Shop where you will find to-die-for sandwiches and pastries served by unpretentious locals. Assuming that you also drive the southern route from Hana another day you will pass by Grandma’s Coffee Shop once again.

 

H. Geocaching: My pocket query produced fifty-four caches on Maui. We only had time to do four caches: GCY0ZQ, GC61E7, GCD7B2, and GCT43T. By far the best of the four was GCT43T ”Olinda Pine Forest” because it involved a challenging hike through an unusual pine forest in the up-country, a switchback trail down deep into a tropical canyon, and lava tubes near GZ.

 

Disclaimer: Don’t forget that Sandy and I spent only one week in Maui and have personal tastes and a bias for nature that no-doubt colors our observations. Keep in mind that we are not travel experts and that we will not be offended by differing opinions. Feel free to comment on and contradict information found in this presentation.

 

NOTE: See photos on "*** This Just In ***" Forum thread.

 

Your pals,

Harmon & Sandy

 

5b201eb8-a3bd-4117-8a49-f25cf689a407.jpg

 

Love in bloom

Edited by SD Rowdies
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RocketMan,

 

At your request, Dave, here's a few observations about vacationing in Maui, Hawaii based upon our limited personal experience. We were there only one week but relied on the extensive experience of our special friends Dave and Bonnie of Clari-netacache. Without Dave and Bonnie we would have seen only half of the Maui sights that we did.

 

Best Guidebook: "Maui Revealed – The Ultimate Guidebook," Andrew Doughty, Wizard Publications, Inc.

 

Best Accommodations: Establish an enduring friendship with somebody that owns a time-share condo anywhere on Maui and then freeload on them as much as you can.

 

Airline: We used Aloha Airline because they offer direct flight between Maui and San Diego. The usual misery of five hours canned up with screaming babies, tattooed twits, and inconsiderate adults can be expected. Go first class if you've got the bucks.

 

Best Transportation: Share your friend's rental vehicle or rent a Jeep rather than a Chrysler Sebring convertible, you know, unless you are fifty-five or over with a gold neck-chain, a fifty-dollar haircut, golf clubs, and a trophy wife. Uh-oh, you do have a trophy wife don't you Dave? Sorry.

 

Hi Lisa! Lisa dear you're such a lovely woman and you deserve the best.

 

Best Places to Eat: Charley's in Makawao and Grandma's Coffee Shop in Keokea. Of course your trophy wife may have other ideas. Charley's is basically a local-hangout bar and hamburger joint once visited by Willie Nelson. Willie owns water front property in Maui so they say. "On th' road-agin' …."

 

Places to Avoid: Any and all of the Disneyesque resorts. The whole resort deal is tattooed twits in bikinis by the pool, expensive shopping, and transplanted palm trees. (See trophy-wife comments above.)

 

By the way, don't let Trailgators know about the tattooed twits in bikinis.

 

Best Things to Do:

 

A. Drive the entire perimeter of Maui using the coastal roads. The rental Jeep will assure passage along the southern flank of Haleakala. All of the paved roads are just fine and very scenic. The unpaved section south of Haleakala ain't all that bad either; easy Jeeping.

 

B. Sea-kayak and snorkeling outing from D.T. Fleming Beach Park to offshore near Slaughterhouse Beach. Outing includes double sit-upon sea kayak, personal flotation device, snorkeling mask and fins, and an informed guide at $80.00 per person. Through the surf, through a short shoreline passage, and two opportunities to snorkel amongst the coral and tropical fish. Drive to the start at the park.

 

C. Drive to summit of Haleakala Crater. There's improved hiking and biking trails into the huge and colorful caldera and thence all the way down the ridgeline. Horseback rides into the caldera are available for small groups of four or five at about $150.00 per person. Incomparable scenery and when the clouds clear you can see southward all the way to the big island. Park service fee except for Golden Age passes. Coasting down Haleakala road on a bicycle seemed really dumb to us. They make you ride in a bunched-up group and wear traffic-safety outerwear. It is possible to mountain bike down the Haleakala ridgeline if you rent a bike and can arrange transportation for both ends of the ride.

 

D. Road to Hana and definitely beyond is a must-do for several reasons such as the shoreline scenery, Black Sand Beach, attractive water falls and pools, Seven Pools, and most importantly the 1.8 mile hike through Bamboo Forest and thence to Waimoku Falls. Low water in the streams and pools while we were there but should be great in March.

 

E. Highway 340 from Lahaina to Kahului to see the shoreline sights and to stop to buy banana bread and to eat your picnic lunch at picnic tables behind the chapel in Kahakuloa Village. Generally pack a picnic lunch for all outings because it's hard to find food service in rural areas. Eat Hawaii Gold pineapple every chance you get.

 

F. 'Ioa Valley. Takes only a couple of hours but its a good way to start right after you get off of the early flight. You get to watch local guys leap twenty feet from a footbridge into a shallow pool; you know, like Passing Wind would do.

 

G. Kula Botanical Garden is extremely informative and delightful. Go early and then ask directions for Grandma's Coffee Shop where you will find to-die-for sandwiches and pastries served by unpretentious locals. Assuming that you also drive the southern route from Hana another day you will pass by Grandma's Coffee Shop once again.

 

H. Geocaching: My pocket query produced fifty-four caches on Maui. We only had time to do four caches: GCY0ZQ, GC61E7, GCD7B2, and GCT43T. By far the best was GCT43T "Olinda Pine Forest" because it involved a challenging hike through an unusual pine forest in the up-country, a switchback trail down deep into a tropical canyon, and lava tubes near GZ.

 

Disclaimer: Don't forget that Sandy and I spent only one week in Maui and have personal tastes and a bias for nature that no-doubt colors our observations. Keep in mind that we are not travel experts and that we will not be offended by differing opinions. Feel free to comment on and contradict information found in this presentation.

 

NOTE: See photos on "*** This Just In ***" Forum thread.

OMG Harmon! That is much more than just a "few tips". Thanks a million for all that info. I had already read about the road to Hana and back on the other side and how the rental agencies don't allow you to go there, but who listens to them anyway. :D I signed up for an SUV, so who knows what the heck the will give us. When we were on the Big Island, we drove our "all wheel drive" SUV down into Waipio Valley where we found out later, no rental cars were allowed because it is so steep, brakes will give out unless you have a low range 4x4. We are taking the whole gang (Lisa and I and the two kids). David is excited because he will be 21 (Oh Boy).

 

BTW: Lisa was ROFLMAO when she read this. She says she always wanted to be a trophy wife.

 

Thanks a bunch,

Dave

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Dave,

 

Somehow I just knew that Lisa would have a laugh. She's a sweety except for the fact that she's afraid of lusty old men.

 

Keep David away from the tatooed bikini twits. Well, you know, unless you accompany him to make sure that he doesn't go overboard.

 

No problem with grades on the south-coast road out of Hana. An SUV will handle it easily, just go for it.

 

Harmon

Edited by SD Rowdies
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Dave,

 

Somehow I just knew that Lisa would have a laugh. She's a sweety except for the fact that she's afraid of lusty old men.

 

Keep David away from the tatooed bikini twits. Well, you know, unless you accompany him to make sure that he doesn't go overboard.

 

No problem with grades on the south-coast road out of Hana. An SUV will handle it easily, just go for it.

 

Harmon

 

Hana looks very cool Harmon! Like an idiot, I got a really bad sunburn on the second day we were there so that killed our planned day to Hana. :D But when we go back we will go there. I was going to add that we got to go skuba diving when we were there. I loved it but Rhonda hated it. She was scared the whole time. So that may be something that Dave and David may want to do when the women go shopping. :D

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Dave,

 

Somehow I just knew that Lisa would have a laugh. She's a sweety except for the fact that she's afraid of lusty old men.

 

Keep David away from the tatooed bikini twits. Well, you know, unless you accompany him to make sure that he doesn't go overboard.

 

No problem with grades on the south-coast road out of Hana. An SUV will handle it easily, just go for it.

 

Harmon

 

Hana looks very cool Harmon! Like an idiot, I got a really bad sunburn on the second day we were there so that killed our planned day to Hana. :D But when we go back we will go there. I was going to add that we got to go skuba diving when we were there. I loved it but Rhonda hated it. She was scared the whole time. So that may be something that Dave and David may want to do when the women go shopping. :D

 

If David and I did that while the women were shopping, I would be scared the whole time! :D

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Dave,

 

Somehow I just knew that Lisa would have a laugh. She's a sweety except for the fact that she's afraid of lusty old men.

 

Keep David away from the tatooed bikini twits. Well, you know, unless you accompany him to make sure that he doesn't go overboard.

 

No problem with grades on the south-coast road out of Hana. An SUV will handle it easily, just go for it.

 

Harmon

 

Hana looks very cool Harmon! Like an idiot, I got a really bad sunburn on the second day we were there so that killed our planned day to Hana. :D But when we go back we will go there. I was going to add that we got to go skuba diving when we were there. I loved it but Rhonda hated it. She was scared the whole time. So that may be something that Dave and David may want to do when the women go shopping. :D

 

If David and I did that while the women were shopping, I would be scared the whole time! :D

 

:huh::D:D:D

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Dave,

 

Somehow I just knew that Lisa would have a laugh. She's a sweety except for the fact that she's afraid of lusty old men.

 

Keep David away from the tatooed bikini twits. Well, you know, unless you accompany him to make sure that he doesn't go overboard.

 

No problem with grades on the south-coast road out of Hana. An SUV will handle it easily, just go for it.

 

Harmon

Hana looks very cool Harmon! Like an idiot, I got a really bad sunburn on the second day we were there so that killed our planned day to Hana. :laughing: But when we go back we will go there. I was going to add that we got to go skuba diving when we were there. I loved it but Rhonda hated it. She was scared the whole time. So that may be something that Dave and David may want to do when the women go shopping. :rolleyes:

If David and I did that while the women were shopping, I would be scared the whole time! :mellow:

Tell them that they have to wear scuba gear while shopping in Maui. That should cut down on expenses.

 

Ain't that cute? I used the phrase "Tell them that they have to ..." in reference to your sweet bride and your daughter. Go ahead Dave, do it and then let me know how it works out for you once you recover.

Edited by SD Rowdies
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Finally got around to stitching some Maui panoramas. Thought you might enjoy seeing this one even though it's reduced in size. It's really something at full resolution. Four frames by the way.

8a7ad624-dc88-4f5f-8141-cf23a2a23474.jpg

Haleakala Caldera.

Very Nice!
That is very cool Harmon! :laughing:

Aw shucks, thank y' very much. Actually I screwed up, there was another frame to the left but the exposure was wrong.

Edited by SD Rowdies
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Nice panoramic composition, Harmon. Almost feels like your there.

 

Here's a banteresque scene from Winchester, England, spotted a week ago Sunday while on a walkabout between Luminous Motion and A Sign of the Times.

-GD

 

d3d9eda3-e184-4b45-a1e4-891c913d6f4e.jpg

Now that's a shot that suggests Photoshop work. What a clever idea in advertising and so typical of things seen in the British Isle. Good eye for interest Don as usual. thanks.

 

It's tempting to 'shop a flip for all four signs as counterpoint.

Edited by SD Rowdies
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Nice panoramic composition, Harmon. Almost feels like your there.

 

Here's a banteresque scene from Winchester, England, spotted a week ago Sunday while on a walkabout between Luminous Motion and A Sign of the Times.

-GD

 

d3d9eda3-e184-4b45-a1e4-891c913d6f4e.jpg

Now that's a shot that suggests Photoshop work. What a clever idea in advertising and so typical of things seen in the British Isle. Good eye for interest Don as usual. thanks. It's tempting to 'shop a flip for all four signs as counterpoint.

8636e116-06a5-4930-bb6c-2f079399ddd3.jpg

Edited by TrailGators
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With Regard to Averaging Coordinates

 

When placing a cache container one must use a GPs receiver to determine latitude and longitude readings for container location. When hunting for containers one soon discovers that placement coordinates aren’t always accurate even though a cache owner may even declare that he or she “averaged the coordinates.”

 

So how is it that averaged coordinates can be so inaccurate now and then? The answer might be that coordinate averaging was done improperly. So what does it mean in this context to average a set of coordinates?

 

Here’s a clue, it does not mean to take coordinate readings several times over and then calculate the mathematical average of several readings. If that’s a surprise to you then please read on for the real-deal.

 

Modern hand-held GPS receivers gather information from not one but two separate satellite communication systems.

 

A. Global Positioning System (GPS) satellites supply basic longitude and latitude data used by GPS receivers. It may seem surprising but GPS data isn’t precise because of a number of operational factors such as disturbances within the ionosphere and signal-path timing errors caused by satellite orbital perturbations. Early on it was realized that some means of broadcasting correctional data was needed to compensate for the variability of the GPS satellite signals.

 

B. Wide Area Augmentation System (WAAS) ground stations and satellites provide correctional information used to increase the accuracy of the hand-held class of GPS receivers. Most modern hand-held GPS receivers do make use of the WAAS signals. There’s a catch of course, that it takes time in minutes for a hand-held GPS receiver to integrate WAAS correctional data with GPS data. For most modern hand-held receivers there is a page of display that shows WAAS time, but only if the GPS receiver is not being moved about.

 

Commonly WAAS time display is provided in the form of an hours:minutes:seconds counter with an accompanying text legend “WAAS Averaging,” displayed together only if the GPS receiver remains completely motionless for a short period of time. In fact the WAAS counter will either reset or even disappear whenever the GPS receiver is physically moved about.

 

To average a Geocache waypoint means to set your GPS receiver down and leave it alone about three minutes while WAAS Averaging takes place. You can watch the small changes taking place on the WAAS counter as time goes by. It is best to prop the GPS receiver in an upright position so that the antenna points somewhat skyward. At three or more minutes either write down the WAAS averaged longitude and latitude readings or, without disturbing the position of your GPS receiver, press the appropriate button of your GPS receiver that captures coordinate readings as a new waypoint.

 

Worth noting is that this approach is especially effective when Geocaching under tree canopies and other overhead obstructions. It takes some patience to allow for WAAS averaging but it will pay off in improved accuracy.

 

For what it's worth,

Harmon

SD Rowdies

Sandy Creek Cowboys

Edited by SD Rowdies
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Pat,

 

Really nice shots. So who is going to send me the collection on CD-R?

 

Harmon

Harmon - Send me your address and I will send you one of the 2 DVD sets (7.7 GB) when I get them burnt.

 

Dave (igeocache@gmail.com)

O Lawdy, Dave, I knowed you wouldn't f'rget me. Bless yo'r little pea-pickin' heart. In return I'll send y' a pi'ture of me in my paper-bag hat and Krispy-Kreme eyeglasses. Shoot, I'll even autigraph it f'r y'. My email is a headin' yo'r way rat now.

 

Harmon,

The Sweet Ol' Boy

Edited by SD Rowdies
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Pat,

Really nice shots. So who is going to send me the collection on CD-R?Harmon

Harmon - Send me your address and I will send you one of the 2 DVD sets (7.7 GB) when I get them burnt. Dave (igeocache@gmail.com)

 

It's amazing that this year's photos would take up 12 CDRs. Last years photos only took two CDRs. I guess next year if the camera's get even higher resolution we'll need 12 DVDs! :o Here is another cool photo that I forgot to post earlier:

bc1369a5-aaf8-41fd-923c-97256e689865.jpg

Rocketman, the Splashes, Jack and Barb and Ruscal headed up Elephant Hill.

Edited by TrailGators
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Isn't it amazing that the San Diego threads are always the top threads in the entire South and West forum category? Do we have a higher density of geocaches, geocachers, or just gabby types? Whatever it is, it's cool.
We have a great group of people out here in SD. This particular thread has been hilarious at times. I should do another retrospective post with all the funniest photoshops that have been posted on this thread. <_< Edited by TrailGators
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Isn't it amazing that the San Diego threads are always the top threads in the entire South and West forum category? Do we have a higher density of geocaches, geocachers, or just gabby types? Whatever it is, it's cool.
We have a great group of people out here in SD. This particular thread has been hilarious at times. I should do another retrospective post with all the funniest photoshops that have been posted on this thread. <_<

Cool! go for it.

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Isn't it amazing that the San Diego threads are always the top threads in the entire South and West forum category? Do we have a higher density of geocaches, geocachers, or just gabby types? Whatever it is, it's cool.
We have a great group of people out here in SD. This particular thread has been hilarious at times. I should do another retrospective post with all the funniest photoshops that have been posted on this thread. <_<

Cool! go for it.

 

I'll start off by posting the links to the last Banter Retro I did:

 

May 2005

June 2005

July 2005

Aug 2005

Sept/Oct 2005

 

Some very funny stuff! <_<

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Isn't it amazing that the San Diego threads are always the top threads in the entire South and West forum category? Do we have a higher density of geocaches, geocachers, or just gabby types? Whatever it is, it's cool.
We have a great group of people out here in SD. This particular thread has been hilarious at times. I should do another retrospective post with all the funniest photoshops that have been posted on this thread. <_<

Cool! go for it.

I'll start off by posting the links to the last Banter Retro I did:

 

Some very funny stuff! <_<

 

We almost need a dedicated website.

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O man, the memories. I love that crocodile photo and the one of the DAK girls and a couple of fat guys, God love 'em. ... Trailgators in a compromising position in front of an EX-LAX sign, good gosh!

 

The truth never came out about who's teeth are in the croc's mouth. Might as well spill the beans ... they belong to FisnJack.

 

If people only knew about the conspiracies behind such photos.

Edited by SD Rowdies
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Here is the complete list of Harmon's Photoshop Lessons:

 

Photoshop Lesson 1: Image Selection and Placement

 

Photoshop Lesson 2: Additive Selection

 

Photoshop Lesson 3: Introduction to Layering

 

Photoshop Lesson 4: Introduction to Warping and Blending

 

Photoshop Lesson 5: Photoshop Drop-Shadow

 

Photoshop Lesson 6: Photoshop Cast-Shadow

 

Photoshop Lesson 7: How to Remove/Add Items into a Photo

 

Photoshop Lesson 8: Placing Photographic Elements into Graphic Images

 

Photoshop Lesson 9: Enhancement of Black Mountain CITO Group Photo

 

Photoshop Lesson 10: Cast Reflections

 

Photoshop Lesson 11: Photoshop CS2 Vanishing Point Filter

 

Photoshop Lesson 12: Layer Masking

 

Photoshop Lesson 13: Grayscale Enhancement

 

Photoshop Lesson 14: Grayscale Enhancement Another Way

 

Photoshop Lesson 15: More on Shadows

My gosh, did I write all that stuff? For a while there was active interest and so it was fun to share. Too bad the interest pooped out just when we were getting into interesting areas. So much to learn and so little time to do so don't you think?

 

There's one lesson I wrote that I didn't post. I spent a huge amount of time researching and writing about a common problem that besets photographers time and again. In the end I withheld the lesson because it couldn't have a happy and useful ending. Still the piece was more comprehensive than you'll find in published Photoshop texts. When all was said and done I realized that it was far too technical to release on a Geocaching Forum thread. In the end I profited from my exploration of a major photo-editing limitation.

 

I recall a comment made during the time of the first one or two lessons. The comment was that "Once you know how to make a selection then you are done." I remember thinking "Anybody can swing a baseball bat but few can hit frequent home runs."

 

A side effect of those Photoshop lessons has been periodic requests from people wanting help with their image issues. Now and then its a request for permission to use one of my images. Result is that I have scenic images on display in some far-away places.

 

What's surprising is that requests come from the darndest places. Just shows that there are a lot of people that surf our local stuff but never reveal their interest with a Forum post. Big brother watching?

 

In the end I'm satisfied that two or three people learned about Photoshop Layers and Channels if nothing else. That and the fact that the lessons lead to being invited to do photo layouts for a dozen of the YMS cards.

 

Life is good.

Edited by SD Rowdies
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My gosh, did I write all that stuff? For a while there was active interest and so it was fun to share. Too bad the interest pooped out just when we were getting into interesting areas. So much to learn and so little time to do so don't you think? In the end I'm satisfied that two or three people learned about Photoshop Layers and Channels if nothing else. That and the fact that the lessons lead to being invited to do photo layouts for a dozen of the YMS cards.

Harmon, I hope it isn't over. I was hoping that posting those lesson links would prompt those that missed the bus the first time to jump in and have some fun with us! :anibad: I appreciate you taking the time to create all these wonderful lessons! ;) Edited by TrailGators
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Harmon, I hope it isn't over. I was hoping that posting those lesson links would prompt those that missed the bus the first time to jump in and have some fun with us! :anibad: I appreciate you taking the time to create all these wonderful lessons! ;)

Pat,

 

One of my great pleasure was seeing you get a handle on Photoshop, and that your daughter did so as well.

 

One thing for sure, your reaction to the proof-copy of your own YMS card was all the entertainment I could have hoped for. That first layout really pushed the envelope and I was happy that you said so.

 

Harmon

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Harmon, I hope it isn't over. I was hoping that posting those lesson links would prompt those that missed the bus the first time to jump in and have some fun with us! ;) I appreciate you taking the time to create all these wonderful lessons! :D

Pat,

One of my great pleasure was seeing you get a handle on Photoshop, and that your daughter did so as well.

One thing for sure, your reaction to the proof-copy of your own YMS card was all the entertainment I could have hoped for. That first layout really pushed the envelope and I was happy that you said so.

Harmon

 

I had forgotten all about that..... :anibad:

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