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TrailGators
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c9440c84-f901-4d66-be88-0ec4ec1de174.jpg

 

Honk if you know where this is.

I guess I should Honk since I was the last one there. :huh: I wasn't sure if it was that one originally since they all look alike. I know there was a critter in front of me in the tunnel but I don't think it was that large.

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Photoshop Lesson 12: Layer Masking

 

Introduction

 

It has been a while since I have posted a Photoshop lesson. Tonight while browsing my Geocaching image gallery I came upon a fine image of Passing Wind atop a mountain peak framed against a dramatic and distant landscape. I have always been interested in the effect of distance on color intensity, you know, the way that color fades into gray tones at a distance. This photograph has three distinct compositional depths and so is picture perfect for this lesson.

 

The cardinal aspects of visual perception are hue, brightness, and chroma. Hue is the electromagnetic frequency of visible light or simply said the color, brightness refers to the intensity of light falling upon or emitting from an object, and chroma is the strength or brilliance of color as perceived by the light sensors of our eyes.

 

Airborne particles such as dust and moisture act as a mask to decrease color brilliance at a distance. Oddly enough Photoshop can be used to counteract such color loss. A simple and effective way to compensate for color loss is by using a layer mask. However, doing so opens an aesthetic issue.

 

The aesthetic issue is whether or not it is right and proper to restore color brilliance to an image that is very much in agreement with what was seen by the photographer when the photograph was taken. It is an issue that is easily tested by presenting two versions of an image, one altered and one not, to a person and asking their preference.

 

Thus the objective of this lesson is twofold, (1) to increase the color intensity of a far-away landscape using a layer mask, and (2) to open a discussion about the result.

 

Practice Photograph

 

a047e0ea-6f0d-4524-a885-31ba9b1e77b3.jpg

 

Procedure

 

Step 1. Open the practice photograph in Photoshop and observe that the far-away landscape fades into gray tones.

 

Step 2. Expand the Layer Pallet and then press keyboard combination Ctrl-J and observe that a new “Layer 1” appears on the Layer Pallet. Note that the new Layer 1 is a copy of the background layer.

 

Step 3. With Layer 1 selected click the “Set the blending mode for the layer” down-arrow and select blend option “Multiply.” Note that the entire image darkens considerably.

 

Step 4. Now add a Layer Mask to Layer 1 by clicking that tiny “Add layer mask” icon at the bottom of the expanded Layer Pallet. Note that a white rectangle appears on the Layer 1 title bar.

 

Step 5. Press the D-key to set default Foreground and Background colors as seen at the “Set foreground color” and “Set background color” swatches near the bottom of the Toolbar. Now press the X-key to switch the foreground and background colors so that the foreground color is White.

 

Step 6. Press the B-key to select the “Brush tool.” On the tool Options Bar make sure that “Mode” is set to “Normal” and “Opacity” is set to “100%.” Use the “Brush” down-arrow to choose a small, hard brush profile and adjust the brush diameter dynamically as needed when performing Step 7 below.

 

Step 7. With Layer 1 selected use the Brush Tool, resizing it now and then, to paint over the image of Passing Wind, his backpack, and his clothing and boots. Note that as you paint over the image you are opening a hole through the Layer Mask and revealing the brighter underlying image of Passing Wind that is on the Background layer. The Make sure to paint over the small details such as the straps of the pack and camera. Be very careful not to paint outside the lines, especially along the edges so that you don’t alter scenic elements.

 

Step 8. Toggle the Layer 1 eyeball icon to view and compare the before and after versions of the image.

 

Step 9. Now File/Save your effort as a Photoshop .psd file. Also save your effort as a .jpg image by clicking the tiny arrowhead at the upper right of the Layer Pallet to select option “Flatten Image” before selecting “File/Save As …” from the Menu Bar.

 

Discussion

 

The aesthetic question for interested Banter readers is “Which image do you prefer, before or after and why?”

 

4b930eed-32ab-4096-a6a3-b3247c93c727.jpg

Edited by SD Rowdies
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I like the 'Before' better. The hazy background makes a nice high-key 'frame' in which we see the (presumed) subject of the photo. When I look at the 'After' picture, I think, "What a great landscape shot. Wish that guy hadn't been standing there." :laughing:

 

Great lesson. Thanks.

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I like the 'Before' better. The hazy background makes a nice high-key 'frame' in which we see the (presumed) subject of the photo. When I look at the 'After' picture, I think, "What a great landscape shot. Wish that guy hadn't been standing there." :)

 

Great lesson. Thanks.

 

Although I see QDMan's point, I'd like the "After" photo better because the colors are more vibrant. Color saturation is very important factor for me. I know that I am often disappointed because when I get home to view my photos many of them do not reflect the amazing beauty that I just witnessed. Great lesson Harmon! :P

 

On a side note, I'm wondering how PW climbed that huge rocky mountain with what looks like hiking loafers. If I wore those I'd twist my ankle on some rock for sure...

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I like the 'Before' better. The hazy background makes a nice high-key 'frame' in which we see the (presumed) subject of the photo. When I look at the 'After' picture, I think, "What a great landscape shot. Wish that guy hadn't been standing there." :P

 

Great lesson. Thanks.

Exactly, you hit the bullseye for the before point of view.

 

As you said the before image emphasizes the human figure because our vision is trained to interpret low chroma as distance and high chroma as nearness. Besides, it just looks natural doesn't it?

 

Here's an artists trick to detect chroma mistakes, while viewing each of the two images rapidly blink your eyes and notice if any part of the image stands out more than the rest. You'll see right away that Passing Wind stands out dramatically from his surroundings in the before image but not at all in the the after image.

 

Blinking a painting is a good trick to use when viewing paintings at an art fair because it reveals that the artist has an understanding of chroma. Amateurs never use chroma for distancing so there's no depth to their compositions. This trick can save you a lot of time at art fairs because you can pass through the exhibits quickly and discover the actual artists. Of course people around you will simply think you need medication.

 

When painting with oils one pushes compositional elements back into a painting by lowering chroma and one pulls objects forward in a composition by preserving high chroma. When painting with oil pigments chroma is lowered by mixing in a small amount of complimentary color. Equal parts, more or less, of a chosen pigment and the complimentary pigment will produce a pure gray. Adding white or black to the mix affects brightness not chroma, denoting the amount of light and shadow befalling a compositional element rather than compositional distance.

 

Blinking a photograph is one way to detect that a digital image that has undergone chroma enhancement.

 

QDman, your grade is A+.

Edited by SD Rowdies
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I like the 'Before' better. The hazy background makes a nice high-key 'frame' in which we see the (presumed) subject of the photo. When I look at the 'After' picture, I think, "What a great landscape shot. Wish that guy hadn't been standing there." :)

 

Great lesson. Thanks.

Although I see QDMan's point, I'd like the "After" photo better because the colors are more vibrant. Color saturation is very important factor for me. I know that I am often disappointed because when I get home to view my photos many of them do not reflect the amazing beauty that I just witnessed. Great lesson Harmon! :P

Pat, you rate an A+ grade as well for your insightful viewpoint about the after image. One couldn't wish for two better responses than you and QDman provided. Makes me glad that I posed the question.

 

Clearly the increase of background chroma in the after image pulled the landscape forward so much that it engulfed Passing Wind and altered the photograph to the extent that it is less a portrature than a landscape composition. Often that's just what an image needs to suit one's taste.

 

Why would one want to do that? Well, to state the obvious, who would want to emphasize an image of a guy with a username like "Passing Wind?" The truth is that chroma emphasis used with care can sometimes turn an ordinary image into a thing of beauty. Don't miss the point that one can reverse the chroma-change process and make compositional elements receded even further into the perceived distance.

 

Messing with the Z-axis, better living through Photoshop.

Edited by SD Rowdies
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On a side note, I'm wondering how PW climbed that huge rocky mountain with what looks like hiking loafers. If I wore those I'd twist my ankle on some rock for sure...

Maybe they are some sort of water-proof storm-drain shoe.

:P

 

I would just hate to screw up my ankle and be that far away from the car. I think something like that happened to Dan-oh's friend on Whitney not too long ago. I have also been learning that having two walking sticks would really help on the long tough hikes!

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I like the 'Before' better. The hazy background makes a nice high-key 'frame' in which we see the (presumed) subject of the photo. When I look at the 'After' picture, I think, "What a great landscape shot. Wish that guy hadn't been standing there." :P

Not sure if I can put my finger on all of the reasons (though some are obvious), but in the "After" shot, it looks as if PW was pasted into a shot that he wasn't in orginally...

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I like the 'Before' better. The hazy background makes a nice high-key 'frame' in which we see the (presumed) subject of the photo. When I look at the 'After' picture, I think, "What a great landscape shot. Wish that guy hadn't been standing there." :anicute:

Not sure if I can put my finger on all of the reasons (though some are obvious), but in the "After" shot, it looks as if PW was pasted into a shot that he wasn't in orginally...

By golly you are quite right. Congratulations, you have a good eye for image details.

 

The reason is that in this lesson the image of the peak on which PW stood underwent a chroma boost along with the mountain ranges, desert floor, and sky. That chroma increase perceptually moved the nearby stones, grasses, and such closer to the fore and so created a depth mismatch between PW and the firmament that supported him. The result is a subtle visual contradiction that the peak seems closer to the eye than PW does even though he clearly stood upon it. Your eyes suspect that PW was floating in air just beyond the mountain top.

 

To eliminate that subtle perception the mask erasure should have included the peak as well the image of PW and his gear. Details of this sort must always be considered when editing images, especially when done for money.

 

This lesson is turning out to be great fun. Thanks for the responses, it's a pleasure and to a degree surprising to have companions that are willing to engage in thoughtful examination of a photograph.

Edited by SD Rowdies
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The reason is that in this lesson the image of the peak on which PW stood underwent a chroma boost along with the mountain ranges, desert floor, and sky. That chroma increase perceptually moved the nearby stones, grasses, and such closer to the fore and so created a depth mismatch between PW and the firmament that supported him. The result is a subtle visual contradiction that the peak seems closer to the eye than PW does even though he clearly stood upon it. Your eyes suspect that PW was floating in air just beyond the mountain top.

 

Funny, you don't sound like a cowboy. :anicute:

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I like the 'Before' better. The hazy background makes a nice high-key 'frame' in which we see the (presumed) subject of the photo. When I look at the 'After' picture, I think, "What a great landscape shot. Wish that guy hadn't been standing there." :anicute:

Not sure if I can put my finger on all of the reasons (though some are obvious), but in the "After" shot, it looks as if PW was pasted into a shot that he wasn't in orginally...

For some of us, most enhancements don't match the subjective "reality" of the scene - whatever that means. I'm reminded of the old Kodachrome vs Ektachrome debates which eventually became passe for many professional photographers when Fuji brought out Velvia. Each film had its signature color characteristics and the choice was one of taste - which is why Kodachrome held up so well even with its degree of artificiality. I'm very impressed with the raw performance of today's better quality digital cameras, particulary in dynamic range and color balance. I limit my image edits to cropping and an occassional modification in overall brightness and, very rarely, overall contrast. My goal is for the images you see in my postings to come as possible to what I actually saw. A well considered exposure still presents the best results IMHO. Guess I would be classified as conservative in this regard.

 

View from Villager ridge last Friday (no enhancements)

d49a923f-42fe-49ce-8d5d-dcd19c6858c4.jpg

 

Son Groovy, on the other hand, is of the modern anything goes school. :anicute:

-GD

Edited by Team Gecko
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I like the 'Before' better. The hazy background makes a nice high-key 'frame' in which we see the (presumed) subject of the photo. When I look at the 'After' picture, I think, "What a great landscape shot. Wish that guy hadn't been standing there." :anicute:

Not sure if I can put my finger on all of the reasons (though some are obvious), but in the "After" shot, it looks as if PW was pasted into a shot that he wasn't in orginally...

For some of us, most enhancements don't match the subjective "reality" of the scene - whatever that means. I'm reminded of the old Kodachrome vs Ektachrome debates which eventually became passe for many professional photographers when Fuji brought out Velvia. Each film had its signature color characteristics and the choice was one of taste - which is why Kodachrome held up so well even with its degree of artificiality. I'm very impressed with the raw performance of today's better quality digital cameras, particulary in dynamic range and color balance. I limit my image edits to cropping and an occassional modification in overall brightness and, very rarely, overall contrast. My goal is for the images you see in my postings to come as possible to what I actually saw. A well considered exposure still presents the best results IMHO. Guess I would be classified as conservative in this regard.

 

View from Villager ridge last Friday (no enhancements)

d49a923f-42fe-49ce-8d5d-dcd19c6858c4.jpg

 

Son Groovy, on the other hand, is of the modern anything goes school. :anicute:

-GD

Don,

 

You explained your position very well by saying that you pay attention to lighting and composition before taking a shot. That's surely the best medicine to get the consistently good images that you post on the Forum. We all admire your work. Also I suspect that you can the bad shots rather than post them.

 

The power of photo editing comes to the fore when special effects are needed for production-shop printinig runs, advertising pizzazz, image restoration and recovery, artistic compositions, forensic investigation, production of baffling puzzle-cache images, and the simple joys of learning how the tools of the trade work for image editing.

 

For Photoshop lessons it is useful to show extreme treatments in order to make a result easy to see. The Lesson 12 treatment would be tempered by lowering the Opacity setting for the Multiply Blend mode thus producing a more Subtle result for a production effort.

 

Thanks for dialing into this discussion.

 

Harmon

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I like the 'Before' better. The hazy background makes a nice high-key 'frame' in which we see the (presumed) subject of the photo. When I look at the 'After' picture, I think, "What a great landscape shot. Wish that guy hadn't been standing there." :)

Not sure if I can put my finger on all of the reasons (though some are obvious), but in the "After" shot, it looks as if PW was pasted into a shot that he wasn't in orginally...

For some of us, most enhancements don't match the subjective "reality" of the scene - whatever that means. I'm reminded of the old Kodachrome vs Ektachrome debates which eventually became passe for many professional photographers when Fuji brought out Velvia. Each film had its signature color characteristics and the choice was one of taste - which is why Kodachrome held up so well even with its degree of artificiality. I'm very impressed with the raw performance of today's better quality digital cameras, particulary in dynamic range and color balance. I limit my image edits to cropping and an occassional modification in overall brightness and, very rarely, overall contrast. My goal is for the images you see in my postings to come as possible to what I actually saw. A well considered exposure still presents the best results IMHO. Guess I would be classified as conservative in this regard.

 

Son Groovy, on the other hand, is of the modern anything goes school. :)

-GD

Don,

 

You explained your position very well by saying that you pay attention to lighting and composition before taking a shot. That's surely the best medicine to get the consistently good images that you post on the Forum. We all admire your work. Also I suspect that you can the bad shots rather than post them.

 

The power of photo editing comes to the fore when special effects are needed for production-shop printinig runs, advertising pizzazz, image restoration and recovery, artistic compositions, forensic investigation, production of baffling puzzle-cache images, and the simple joys of learning how the tools of the trade work for image editing.

 

For Photoshop lessons it is useful to show extreme treatments in order to make a result easy to see. The Lesson 12 treatment would be tempered by lowering the Opacity setting for the Multiply Blend mode thus producing a more Subtle result for a production effort.

 

Thanks for dialing into this discussion.

 

Harmon

Well put, Harmon. I'm well aware that the classic era photographers like Strand, Weston, Adams, Cunningham, Weston II, et al manipulated their images to the degree they dodged/burned to bring out full tonality their "visualization", partially due to range limitations of their films but particularly for artistic effect. As Adams put it, the negative is akin to a musical score awaiting the musician's interpretation. I have done so too, mostly in the in the past, with some of my black & white enlargements from negatives. I am not sure anyone could (or should) legitimately claim to be a purist. There is something special going on, though, when the lighting conditions and composition of the scene click and a full frame exposure is gifted to the person fortunate enough to have been there to receive it.

-Don

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My goal is for the images you see in my postings to come as possible to what I actually saw. A well considered exposure still presents the best results IMHO. Guess I would be classified as conservative in this regard.

 

Son Groovy, on the other hand, is of the modern anything goes school. :) -GD

My Canon S200 is not a very good camera. But it is very small and fits into my pocket so I like it. However, most of the photos I take do not look like what I saw. The days we were on Eagle Peak and Gower it was very clear, but my photos look like there was a light fog. So Harmon's Z-axis trick gets those photos much closer to what I saw on those days. Plus there are many days I go hiking and it is not clear. It is a bummer because the photos do not come out very well on those days. So using Harmon's Z-axis trick to me basically changes the weather to make it look clearer than it really was (but still realistic).

 

So I guess I lean more towards the Groovy way of thought! :)

Edited by TrailGators
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I would just hate to screw up my ankle and be that far away from the car. I think something like that happened to Dan-oh's friend on Whitney not too long ago. I have also been learning that having two walking sticks would really help on the long tough hikes!

 

Interesting article in today's UT on using walking sticks. We've got 3 sticks in the family, and they're indispensable. I thought I'd mainly use them for poking for ammo cans, but can't imagine a trail hike without them.

Link to comment

 

I would just hate to screw up my ankle and be that far away from the car. I think something like that happened to Dan-oh's friend on Whitney not too long ago. I have also been learning that having two walking sticks would really help on the long tough hikes!

 

Interesting article in today's UT on using walking sticks. We've got 3 sticks in the family, and they're indispensable. I thought I'd mainly use them for poking for ammo cans, but can't imagine a trail hike without them.

I finally got one and I love it! But on the longer steeper hikes I wish I had two!

Link to comment

 

I would just hate to screw up my ankle and be that far away from the car. I think something like that happened to Dan-oh's friend on Whitney not too long ago. I have also been learning that having two walking sticks would really help on the long tough hikes!

 

Interesting article in today's UT on using walking sticks. We've got 3 sticks in the family, and they're indispensable. I thought I'd mainly use them for poking for ammo cans, but can't imagine a trail hike without them.

I finally got one and I love it! But on the longer steeper hikes I wish I had two!

I just ordered a second one from REI - thanks to their 20% discount and my "dividend", I'm getting it for free! <_<

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I would just hate to screw up my ankle and be that far away from the car. I think something like that happened to Dan-oh's friend on Whitney not too long ago. I have also been learning that having two walking sticks would really help on the long tough hikes!

 

Interesting article in today's UT on using walking sticks. We've got 3 sticks in the family, and they're indispensable. I thought I'd mainly use them for poking for ammo cans, but can't imagine a trail hike without them.

I finally got one and I love it! But on the longer steeper hikes I wish I had two!

I just ordered a second one from REI - thanks to their 20% discount and my "dividend", I'm getting it for free! :(

 

REI....REI....REI <_<

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I wrote a little piece in my blog about my hiking stick last year after Princess Toadstool and I hiked Twin Peaks.

 

I purchased a new one since I wrote the blog entry. It is like TrailGators' hiking stick in that it can be used as a monopod for taking pictures.

 

...nice track of Twin Peaks Loop, hey but I live there! I like the idea of a hiking stick, but I can't imagine hiking in sandals...

Edited by hrtpmpfxr
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Photoshop Lesson 13: Grayscale Enhancement

 

Introduction

 

Lesson 12 explored the issue of emphasizing distant vistas of an image by increasing color strength. The lesson ended by asking the question – “Which image do you prefer, before or after and why?” That question stimulated some interesting Banter-thread discussion with regard to image editing. It was interesting to see that both sides of the consideration had enthusiastic adherents.

 

Seeing that opinion was clearly divided one might wonder how broad and how consistent that division might be. Perhaps the fundamental issue is whether or not images should be altered or not.

 

Oddly enough every image downloaded from a digital camera has undergone considerable alteration. Image data captured by a digital camera automatically undergoes enhancement and compression before leaving the camera. Of course professional cameras are able to download raw image data taken right from the CCD but we will save that topic for another day.

 

Perhaps some people are fundamentally opposed to the very idea of image enhancement. Perhaps others prefer enhanced images. This lesson will invite the same comparison and discussion about resulting before and after images. It is the policy of this writer to discourage fist-fights, you know, unless I'm there to watch.

 

In this lesson we will convert a color image to grayscale mode and offer it for comparison as the “before” image. We will then explore a means of extracting an enhanced grayscale image from the same color image to serve as the “after” image. In any case this lesson will demonstrate a means of introducing dramatic contrasts to grayscale images that are somewhat flat in terms of contrast.

 

Practice Image

 

A photo from an off-road Geocaching adventure through the scenic wonders surrounding Moab, Utah.

 

5775f644-6d96-48fa-bf0a-17eccd10a780.jpg

 

Procedure

 

Step 1. Using Photoshop, open the practice photograph.

 

Step 2. On the Workspace Menu Bar select “Image/Mode/Grayscale.” Click OK to “Discard color information.” There you have it, the “before” comparison image. Save the image to a convenient filename such as “Cliffhangers Grayscale Before.”

 

Step 3. Enter keyboard combination Ctrl-Alt-Z and note that the color image has returned to view.

 

Step 4. On the Layers/Channels Pallet click the Channels Tab.

 

Step 5. In sequence enter keyboard combinations Crtl-1, Ctrl-2, and Ctrl-3 noting on the Channels Pallet that the each keyboard combination activates but one of the color channels Red, Blue, and Green. Use these keyboard combinations to switch between color channels and decide which channel provides the most dramatic grayscale image. The answer is the Red channel of course. As you see the Red channel offers far more contrast between clouds and sky, and far more dramatic contrast in the landscape and in the talent.

 

Step 6. This step will duplicate the Red color channel in the form of a separate image file. Right-click the Red channel and select “Duplicate Channel” from the fly-out menu. On the “Duplicate Channel” pop-up window click the “Destination/Document” drop-down arrow and select “New.” In the “Name” box enter a convenient filename such as “Cliffhangers Grayscale After.” Finally click “OK” and note that a new image of the same size and resolution has been opened and that the Channel pallet now shows only one channel named “Alpha 1.” Also note that the Workspace Title Bar displays the new filename and shows that the image mode is “Alpha 1/8.” That means that the image mode is neither color nor grayscale, rather the color mode is now Multichannel.

 

Note: For the next step we need to duplicate the Background layer of the new image but there’s a problem. The problem is that layer processing is inactive in Multichannel image mode. To see this click the Layer Tab and hover the cursor over any layer processing icon at the bottom of the Layer pallet. Observe that the international No-nut appears when hovering over any one of the icons. We need to change the image mode so that the Background layer can be duplicated.

 

Step 7. On the Workspace Menu Bar select “Image/Mode/Grayscale.” Note that the layer processing icons activate and that the Title bar changed to “Grayscale/8” mode. Now press keyboard combination “Ctrl-J” to duplicate the Background layer. With the new “Layer 1” activated click the “Set the blending mode for the layer” arrow and select “Multiply” blending mode. Now click the “Set the master opacity for the layer” arrow and the drag the opacity slider left to “50%.”

 

Note: To suit taste one can adjust the slider to other positions and achieve more moderate results. For this exercise the 50% position was chosen to make the result very apparent. In practice it's also useful to consider one or two other blending modes. The "Multiply" blending mode will most often produce a very dramatic result.

 

Step 8. Press keyboard combination Ctrl-E to merge the two layers. Save this image as the “After” comparison image.

 

Step 9. For comparison open both images and then, from the Workspace Menu Bar, select “Window/Arrange/Tile Vertically.” Use the image-window sliders to compare portions of the before and after images.

 

Discussion

 

The aesthetic question for interested Banter readers is “Which image do you prefer, before or after, and why do you prefer it?” No nonsense about preferring the color image, O.K.?

 

3d2fbd16-ea73-4c27-9b9e-abdc63cf5261.jpg

 

Before

 

5ba8e777-83c8-431b-b0b9-59a8ab61d5cf.jpg

 

After

Edited by SD Rowdies
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Hi Harmon I can't wait to try this new lesson! Thanks for posting it! The after image is superior because there is so much more contrast which brings out the details hidden in the lower shades of gray. It's interesting that you showed this because this is one of the big reasons that Sony TVs differentiate themselves from the competition. Being able to achieve high details in lower grayscales is the mark of a great image. :rolleyes:

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Hi Harmon I can't wait to try this new lesson! Thanks for posting it! The after image is superior because there is so much more contrast which brings out the details hidden in the lower shades of gray. It's interesting that you showed this because this is one of the big reasons that Sony TVs differentiate themselves from the competition. Being able to achieve high details in lower grayscales is the mark of a great image. :rolleyes:

Pat,

 

Gosh, thanks for the instant response. Glad to have a following no matter how small. This lesson produces an effect like using a red filter on a camera lens, except that with Photoshop the effect can easily be varied over a wide range. Interesting comparison with the Sony products.

 

Have fun,

Harmon

Edited by SD Rowdies
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Habu’s MTRP GCV1D1 posted and then … Cegrube up hill FTF middle of the night … snicker … next day same trail my GCV1MW ... ha, ha, ha … Cegrube up hill FTF middle of the night … snicker, snicker … with his wife … om’gosh, haw, haw, haw … then Chuy and Ginger jump out of hiding…giggle, snark, giggle, giggle … Gr-rower! EEEEK!

 

Life is good,

Harmon

Edited by SD Rowdies
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