Jump to content

Looking For Entry Level Info On Ham Radio


StanB
Followers 1

Recommended Posts

I'm considering getting a Tech license and using 2-meter handheld radios for communication on the road and while geocaching, but am overwhelmed by all the opinions and technical information in the various forums and web sites. So my question is: Where can I find a SIMPLE guide to getting started in 2M amateur radio?

 

Primarily I'm looking for info that would help me select a decent radio for basic communication without the complexity and expense of extra features. And I'd also appreciate a suggestion for a good place to start in getting the license.

 

Thanks in advance, Stan

Link to comment

Sorry, I can't help you with a place to find quick and easy radio review, as I haven't found one yet. If you do, let me know!

 

The best place to start, IMHO would be to get a copy of the ARRLs "Now You're Talking" study guide for the Tech license. It's available here... http://www.arrl.org/catalog/lm/ or you might be able to find it in local book stores or electronics stores. I think it's the best book on the market for passing the test. Not necisarily the best for HAM radio in general, but it'll get your feet wet enough to know what other books to look for.

Link to comment

Thanks for the replies. I found a web site with sample Tech exams and easily passed them (I'm an old electronics hobbiest and hold a Communications Specialist rating in the Coast Guard Auxiliary). But I'm having difficulty figuring out brand/model/features for a relatively inexpensive handheld transceiver for occasional communications. Stan

Link to comment

New and cheap: Alincos

 

Used and cheap: Hamfest or Ham auction.

 

I bought a Yeasu dual bander from Ebay and it works, but the battery is a pain and the model is so old that batteries have to be special ordered for them at great cost.

 

I bought an ICOM P2AT at an auction for $95. Only got 2 meters, but it can make my Yeasu look BAD by comparison. It can reach out and hit repeaters that are 15 miles away from my house from inside my house on a rubber duck.

 

Love that little thing.

 

I am now a believer in the maxim "I never got screwed by a HAM when dealing face to face". No one wants to be seen by their fellow HAMs as a jerk. They aren't going to sell trash to another HAM. Ebay is another story.

Edited by bigredmed
Link to comment

Exactly what are you planning on using your radio for? If you are just wanting to use radio to keep in contact with others during a cache hunt then perhaps the family service radios would work better for you.....

 

Just an idea...

Ham radio is a hobby in itself.

 

Daren

Link to comment

Daren, communication during a cache hunt is only one reason I'm interested in becoming active on 2 meters. Another is experimenting with APRS equipment. A third is that I've found FRS and other line-of-sight systems too limited in range due to our hilly terrain. And finally, I've always found amateur radio interesting and I want to learn more so I can work and talk intelligently with other hams.

 

I agree, ham radio is a great hobby.

Stan

Link to comment

Good luck with the exam.

 

Here is a last thought on buying radios.

 

www.eham.net

 

"Product Reviews" on the menu list. This is a great place for product reviews and they go way back. It would not surprise me that someone put in a review of Marconi's radio :o

 

I use it every time I look into buying a radio.

Link to comment
QRZ.com remains a small business that is run by Fred and is housed in a spare room of his home. Fred still works his daytime job as a systems architect for a major computer company and manages QRZ on his evenings and weekends. Fred is extremely grateful for the support of the many friends that he has made on the internet and looks forward to making many more in the future.

 

Stick with the ARRL... :-)

Link to comment
QRZ.com remains a small business that is run by Fred and is housed in a spare room of his home. Fred still works his daytime job as a systems architect for a major computer company and manages QRZ on his evenings and weekends. Fred is extremely grateful for the support of the many friends that he has made on the internet and looks forward to making many more in the future.

 

Stick with the ARRL... :-)

I agree, the ARRL is the cost-effective way to go.

 

If you are a member, they give you discounts on their courses, and more access to their old journals.

 

Nothing bad to say about qrz, but eham.net has the question pool as well and seems to be better regarded in terms of product reviews. If the ARRL isn't your cup of tea, then try the questions on eham.

 

As for the Internet for Dummies book, I looked at it when I was studying for the Tech license, and its REALLY basic and wouldn't even get you past the Tech. Go for ARRL's "Now You're Talking". It has the question pool and the text is basic, yet with sufficient depth to actually be useful.

Link to comment

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
Followers 1
×
×
  • Create New...