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Cascade Volcano Caching Society


Bull Moose
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Heres the gear list in PDF format. Its the essentials, if you have any questions about stuff ask.. others can share there experience..there obviously missing food and tent etc..but you get the idea of what you may need........

 

http://www.alpineascents.com/pdf/adams-climb-gear.pdf

 

above list is provided from this web site..gotta give them credit, they did a good job on this web site if you ask me.......

http://www.alpineascents.com/adams-climb.asp

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The last weekend of July works the best for me. Peace, Nolenator

Likewise. Last weekend in July.

 

Let's see if I can do my own little instant essentials (short) list:

Water (more important than food)

Wind protection (like a light raincoat, good for wind, rain and some warmth by holding in your body warmth)

Sunglasses

Sunscreen (if it is sunny you'll be really sorry, if its cloudy just a little less sorry)

Food (give me a box of Ritz crackers and I'm good)

Get a grip! (good tread, an Ice axe would be good here , maybe treking poles)

Some warm clothing

 

Other than that you can make an endless list

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Heres the gear list in PDF format. Its the essentials, if you have any questions about stuff ask.. others can share there experience..there obviously missing food and tent etc..but you get the idea of what you may need........

 

http://www.alpineascents.com/pdf/adams-climb-gear.pdf

 

above list is provided from this web site..gotta give them credit, they did a good job on this web site if you ask me.......

http://www.alpineascents.com/adams-climb.asp

It looks like that is for a more technical route. The more power to anyone who wants to do the glacier route. That's beyond my ability.

I want to do the non-technical south route where the most you may need is an ice axe and crampons maybe, according to the info I've seen.

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Actually that list is for the guide service to cover there @33 in case someone falls.

The equipment list is overdone. A ice ax and crampons I believe are essential, the helmet harness, rope are probably not gonna be needed and if they are I'm turning around.

The most important thing I believe is to climb to your ability and equipment. If your unprepared for conditions or above your ability turn around. Easily said but its cost alot of lives in the mtns.

My equipment list will be,

 

pack

crampons

ice ax

good waterproof insulated boots, stiff solid tread for kicking steps in snow

gloves

2 pairs of wool sox

2 pairs of wicking liner socks

1 pair of light poly underwear

fleece hiking pants or comparable

light long sleeve shirt (white and non cotton)

light fleece pullover or jacket

waterproof/windprooff hiking coat, light weight

lightweight waterproof pants

gaitors

hat fleece

sunglasses

sunscreen, and lip screen

small bivy tent

pad, and sleeping bag.

2 1 qt water bottles.

stove and utensils etc.

food

headlamp

GPSr

extra batteries for all electronic devices

camera!!!!!

small first aid kit, asperin, mole skin etc.

 

I'm hoping to have a pack under 40lbs. Even less for the summit attempt, no tent sleeping bag etc.

It is just a snowfield were going up, no glaciers thats why I see no need for rope or harness, but a very steep icy hill would make me turn around.

Edited by top pin
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I'm hoping to have a pack under 40lbs. Even less for the summit attempt, no tent sleeping bag etc.

FORTY pounds?

 

Crap.

 

Even just under 40 pounds....

 

Pack mule, anyone? (I keep coming up with good reasons to get one!)

 

-=-

 

Speaking of pack weight tho - how much weight do you guys figure you carry for an overnight outing? And... more importantly, what is your packs ratio to your body weight? AND, is that very important?

 

I start to get a little bit intimidated when y'all talk about these huge packs and what they weigh... I KNOW I can't carry 40 pounds on my back... just t'ain't no way I could do it w/o serious repercussions.

 

Is Cache Ahead around? If you are - how heavy is your pack for a good overnight hike?

 

I'm just starting to amass my gear for something a little more serious than Col. Bob or Mt. Jupiter (um, didn't have enough for that one!) and am trying to be pretty weight conscious, probably moreso than the average person, er, guy.

 

Would appreciate some hiking/backpacking input!

 

Thanks!

 

-=-

michelle

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My pack weight for an overnighter (minus food and water) tends to be a little heavier than for multiple nights just because I know that I won't be lugging it for that long. However, as I get older, my pack gets lighter. When I was 19, 50 lbs was no problem. Top pin is right though - 35-40 lbs is about all I want to carry now. I am still lightening up as I go and replace heavy gear with lighter.

 

If my wife is going with me, my pack will be a little heavier. We try to keep hers under 25 lbs with food and water. I guess I'm the pack mule when she's around :)

 

The part of my body that really suffers is my feet. The heavier the pack, the more they hurt.

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Speaking of pack weight tho - how much weight do you guys figure you carry for an overnight outing? And... more importantly, what is your packs ratio to your body weight? AND, is that very important?

The last time I saw you you were pretty thin. The best hiking advise is over on the NW Hiker's forum. :)

 

Search for packs or something. This thread has some useful information.

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The last weekend of July works the best for me.  Peace, Nolenator

Likewise. Last weekend in July.

 

Let's see if I can do my own little instant essentials (short) list:

Water (more important than food)

Wind protection (like a light raincoat, good for wind, rain and some warmth by holding in your body warmth)

Sunglasses

Sunscreen (if it is sunny you'll be really sorry, if its cloudy just a little less sorry)

Food (give me a box of Ritz crackers and I'm good)

Get a grip! (good tread, an Ice axe would be good here , maybe treking poles)

Some warm clothing

 

Other than that you can make an endless list

You forgot to mention 60 bottles of beer. Absolutely essential in avalanche territory

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It's amazing what mules can do.

 

At some point here before Mt Adams, I'm going to hike up o Camp Muir (10,000' on Rainier). It maybe something we could or should all do together. It'll give you a good feel for doing Adams.

 

Weather is perhaps the most dangerous factor in any climb. I've been up to Camp Muir many times, never much of a problem other than whiteouts (bring your GPS). The last time I did Muir it was cold and blowing about 60 MPH. It was a challenge and a struggle, but I got there. The real problem was trying to get back down. The snowfield had glazed over with crusty hard ice! I had no crampons but did have my ice axe. I had to cut some of my steps as I went and I was already exhausted. Luckily I hadn't stayed to long at Muir and this dangerous decent did not extend down too far, but the section I had to pass through was getting rather scarey. If I had slipped I would have slid a long way and been torn up in the process. Yes, I knew conditions were not great and I could have anticipated this and turned around and should have, but this is the sort of thing that can happen in seemingly safe places in poor weather.

 

http://www.geocaching.com/seek/log.aspx?II...299e&LID=380412

 

Thus, if you're in poor weather think twice. Frankly I think Adams should be fine that time of the year.

Edited by EraSeek
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The last weekend of July works the best for me.  Peace, Nolenator

Likewise. Last weekend in July.

 

Let's see if I can do my own little instant essentials (short) list:

Water (more important than food)

Wind protection (like a light raincoat, good for wind, rain and some warmth by holding in your body warmth)

Sunglasses

Sunscreen (if it is sunny you'll be really sorry, if its cloudy just a little less sorry)

Food (give me a box of Ritz crackers and I'm good)

Get a grip! (good tread, an Ice axe would be good here , maybe treking poles)

Some warm clothing

 

Other than that you can make an endless list

You forgot to mention 60 bottles of beer. Absolutely essential in avalanche territory

Wow!

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It appears that a lot of expertice is available thus far but I thought I would offer to advise those that have specific equipment questions. As far as credibility, lets start with 28 assents of Rainier, 5 of Adams, leader of a sucessful accent of Denali. 13 plus years teaching mountaineering..........sorry! I'll quit hogging the spotlight. But if questions do arise feel free to contact me.

 

EraSeek has the right idea with a group climb to Miur. In my opinion, the biggest risk is a group not having the proper leadership (big topic for discussion) and big mountains are no place for indivuals.

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It appears that a lot of expertice is available thus far but I thought I would offer to advise those that have specific equipment questions. As far as credibility, lets start with 28 assents of Rainier, 5 of Adams, leader of a sucessful accent of Denali. 13 plus years teaching mountaineering..........sorry! I'll quit hogging the spotlight. But if questions do arise feel free to contact me.

 

EraSeek has the right idea with a group climb to Miur. In my opinion, the biggest risk is a group not having the proper leadership (big topic for discussion) and big mountains are no place for indivuals.

Wow! Impresive! I would never even want to do Denali. I've read enough about it to know what can happen and often does on that one.

 

As far as group climbs you are quite right. However, I almost always climb alone. I just prefer it that way. Please be our leader Runhills!

 

As far as Adams is concerned, I do recomend ice axes. I have two extras. And crampons maybe less so but still good to have. If you do not use both or either, than you should make a later start to the top so you have softer snow.

 

So you coming Runhills?

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As you can tell from my Geocaching jaunts I too go SOLO quite a bit of the time. I know my strengths and weak area and can adjust accordingly. I do enjoy group outing that are low key where a leader has not really been designated although I have a pretty good feeling in who would emerge as leader should a crisis require a leader.

 

Yes, I am very interested in climbing Adams and am strongly concidering this group. As far as being leader, I need more information about the group before I would concider stepping up to being leader. I need to know those that I am to lead. Strengths, skills and most important does their atitude/ethics fit in with mine.

 

As an example, I already see discussions about pack weight. Lacking the proper experience, climbers make two mistakes; they carry stuff they don't need or they skimp and hope nothing goes haywire. As a climbing leader I would see my role as bringing members of both groups together. The group is only as strong as the slowest member and the strongest member is of no help if they are way ahead and can't help the weaker when a problem arises. Along the lines of equipment; if you bring something such as an ice axe you should know how to use it after you slip and fall

 

So yes I want to go, I'm not real interested in being the organizer but might concider leading a homogeneous group. I will not be a guide where folks depend on me to make all the calls thus assuming responsibility,

 

So even though we may prefer SOLO over groups I feel we need folks to know each other so that they not only trust each other but care for each other. A lot of blabber but I hope it helps you understand the person you have gone out on a limb and asked to be your leader.

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Well it is difficult to know what approuch to take here. Frankly I perfer a loose group as well. Not all that interested in being led or leading, but willing to provide my experience where I can. Not know the ablities of the others is the question mark. I made 2 attempts on Adams with others before I went and did it sucessfully on my own, so I know that abilities vary.

 

I think doing Muir together will provide the knowledge we need of people, abilities, and methods as a group we need, but more importantly it will provide some experience for those who need it.

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In my opinion, the biggest risk is a group not having the proper leadership (big topic for discussion) and big mountains are no place for indivuals.

Having just watched "The Eiger Sanction" for the first time yesterday...and read Krakauer's book about the Everest calamity....oh yeah.

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EraSeek, like you, I prefer not to be led or be leader. My participatation/role depends on how well I get to know others.

 

The December before our May climb of Denali we attemped Rainier as a group shakedown. At that point we were a group of friends with no designated leader; the way most people with experience prefer. Well without going into details, twelve of us ended up high on the mountain with two three person tents for a party of 12. It seems that everybody thought somebody else was carring a tent so in the interest of saving weight they left theirs behind. We all survived the blizzard but some tough choices had to be made and it wasn't going to happen via consensus.

 

The more experience you have with a group of people the less visible the leadership needs to be. Lacking this experience together, a leader that is willing to lead and more important one whose leadership is respected by everybody in the group is desirable. The extreme would to hire a guide.

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I really want to do this one with everyone. My experience level is I’ve done mountains higher than Adams, but have never used crampons or an ice axe. I don’t think I would be holding any one back, but could definitely use some advice in the area of dealing with climbing a snow field.

The problem we had when I first tried Adams was that there were 2 of us who were experienced and one that was not. We were shepherding him up a small steep snow bank. We were side by side with him, telling him to "kick in" his steps and dig in his axe more. We even offered to rope him up. He just did not kick his steps in properly and fix his axe well enough. He slipped. We yelled "use your axe!" He lost it. All we could do was watch him slide away down this somewhat small snow bank and bounce over a rock outcrop. He was bruised and in shock but otherwise fine. We roped him up for the retreat to timberline. All this happened under the watchfull eyes of two experienced hikers and BEFORE we even made it to "Lunchcounter".

 

This points out the importance of knowing how to kick in a step and using an axe. The biggest hazzard to someone who doesn't know how.

 

I have also seen a climber with different group on St Helens bleeding from his head where he stabbed himself with his axe.

 

This points out the importance of knowing how to use an axe properly!

 

So the solution is, climb up Muir with us and learn to use an axe. Really not all that hard to do.

 

On the other hand I may be the one that slows you down. Gottanother darn birthday coming :o

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Michelle the CG :

I  start to get a little bit intimidated when y'all talk about these huge packs and what they weigh... I KNOW I can't carry 40 pounds on my back... just t'ain't no way I could do it w/o serious repercussions.

 

Michelle, I am not as lean as you, but I am um vertically challenged and have been between 115 and 130 for the past two years. In my youth, I really stuggled with backpacking more than 40 lbs. My excuse was usually that I have small pack so I can't carry that much, but the fact was it would just kill me on those death marches.

 

Even though this old gray mare just aint what she used to be, I seem to handle this weight better because i am slower and have a little kid. I still train with elevation at least 6 hours a week and often I am carrying Evan. I worked very hard this past summer with "above the clouds" in mind, and I felt like a spring chicken on 9/11 hiking up St Helens.

 

So I guess I advise you to carry a loaded pack when ever you go hiking from now on, then start increasing the weight as the time draws near.

 

Also, we don't have to carry the whole pack to the summit unless it is a loop route,right? ... so we just need to carry tent, stove etc.. to the base camp?

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I'd be up for Muir also if we have a date for that well in advance. Coming from 8 hours away for that, I'd really like to be able to plan that well in advance

Its been 10+ years since I've had the ice ax in my hands. I've been to the 9000' level on Mt Baker 18 years ago when I was 14, climbed Chair Peak north face when I was 12 and been up many many other peaks in the cascades. Since moving away from the west side many years ago, its been along time since I've had a chance to go again. Geocaching has reinspired me to make it up some of those peaks I've always wanted to do. A refresher course especially with Runhills experience would be just fantastic at Muir.

And for a off topic side story.. Who mentioned that they climbed St Helens and it started smoking 2 weeks later. My father climbed St Helens in early March of 1980, on the summit cap they discoved a huge crevasse that should not be there, since its not a glacier. They stayed roped up because of this. 5 days later that cracked started venting steam and made it on the news. My father says when the helicopter was filming the venting steam you still could see his parties foot prints in the snow. 2 months later we all know what happened in May. I was 8 yrs old and still remember that day. Wish I was old enough then to have climbed it on that trip. I'm still gonna summit that Mtn, hopefully I dont carry the same cursor to that mtn or Adams for that matter.

Edited by top pin
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Well it is difficult to know what approuch to take here. Frankly I perfer a loose group as well.

There is also a "12 Heartbeat Rule" in the wilderness areas, so if we get too big we'll have to split in two groups anyway.

 

I've used an ice axe, but can use some brusing up if people head to Muir.

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So I guess I advise you to carry a loaded pack when ever you go hiking from now on, then start increasing the weight as the time draws near.

CFM -

 

I used to pack the kids until they hit 35-pounds using a pretty good pack... Beyond that I start to hurt. It's not just being loaded down... it's a little more debilitating than that.

 

I have considered carrying a loaded pack while out and about of late - the bonus being that it would also help me burn extra calories. Currently, I can walk my a** off at a right good pace for 4 or 5 miles and not even burn enough to warrant me a candy bar for all my hard work.

 

:P

 

If I'm gonna <ahem> sweat that much, I want a snack at the end.

 

:)

 

THANKS for the suggestion. It's a good one.

 

 

michelle

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I have two from Team Redleg +1 other (veteran mountaineer and Army Mtn. qualified climber from the Mountain Battalion). All are from PDX too.

 

The late July time frame, either 23-24 or 30-31, is a go for all of us. We have a field exercise the weekend after the 4th. Mid-August is taken up with camp for our kids and anniversaries.

 

Palm Grunt

Edited by Palm Grunt
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Just found out my final is on August 6, so that blows that weekend for me.

I may have to take some time off of work and do it mid-week.

I thought we were leaning toward the weekend before that. Did you mean that the July 30-31 weekend is out so you can spend the time studying?

I was thinking about that weekend of August 6, but I can't do that, obviously..

If a group goes that last weekend in July I might be able to come. I guess I won't know until I see how much studying I need to do....

 

Pfft... Stupid school. Between it and work there is a serious dent in my leisure time. :rolleyes:

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Pack your books up to Lunch Counter and do some studying while in camp. Or d/l lectures or what not to a mp3 player and study as you hike.

 

Any previos climbers can you tell me how long it took from the parking lot to lunch counter? I'd like to know if I need a extra day off of work.

Thanks....

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Pack your books up to Lunch Counter and do some studying while in camp.

I'm going to have a hard enough time without lugging casebooks up there. :rolleyes:

 

I'm going to try my hardest to make it work somehow.

That's what I did when I climbed Adams. You can leave all your extra stuff in camp when you summit. Personally, I think it is an easier climb than what most believe. You have to watch out for weather of course but for being a mountain it is pretty basic.

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Any previos climbers can you tell me how long it took from the parking lot to lunch counter? I'd like to know if I need a extra day off of work.

Thanks....

3-5 hours according to NWSource

 

Plan for 3-5 hours to reach Lunch Counter and another 3-5 hours if you plan to continue on to the summit.

 

Have to admit it looks like a fun trip but I promised myself a long time ago I wouldn't climb another mountain.

 

For those who haven't spent much time above 8,000 feet you can definitely feel the altitude. Last time I climbed a mountain I'd spent a month or longer at 5,000 feet but when we camped at 9,000 feet I waited much of the evening for me to catch my breath. Finally realized when it had been 3 hours that I wasn't going to catch it until I got back home. No big deal if you're in halfway decent shape but a weird feeling when just laying in the sun causes you to pant.

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Based on concerns of inexperience (and I am inexperienced) I'm pulling out of this. I'll work my way up to it one day if time ever allows again.

kenr74 is right. It is pretty basic and perhaps easier than we have made it sound. I have just wanted to stress that it does take a lot of effort and some basic caution. I don't have a huge concern about inexperienced climbers. My concern is going at this without considered forethought and cautions. Given an OK day inexperienced climbers can do this mountain with some awareness.

 

Right now my biggest concern is my knee and the size of this group. So I'm only a maybe. I am, however looking forward to doing Camp Muir with everyone. I think that would be fun and safe.

 

Date? Maybe mid-June?

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Right now my biggest concern is my knee and the size of this group.

I wouldn't worry about the size of the group. We had a big "group" at St. Helens- 16 or so - but we all ended up in groups of 2 or 3 that went their own speed. (Or in my case most of the way up, a group of one). I anticipate it would go that way at Adams too. I just don't want to be alone again. I wasn't too concerened at St. Helens because there were tons of people around.

 

Hope your knee feels better. I look forward to Muir too.

Edited by Bull Moose
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I'm not really a big group guy either. I prefer like 3-4 max usually. But it'll probably work out that everybody has different paces and collect into smaller groups. I know I've been getting a reputation for being a fast hiker, but in reality, I tend to go for a more steady pace and take several quick water stops. I carry water bottle around my neck and that allows to me easily sip here and there. I've found that you want to drink water on a regular basis. This helps reduce dehydration and cramped legs. If I do this, this will be a totally new experience for me. Camp Muir is a very good idea to test out altitude effects and get some instruction on ice axe/crampons. I've never used that equipment.

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I've never used any equipment, either, and really look forward to trying Muir. My husband and I have hiked all over Rainier BK (before kids), but we never got up there. He never wanted to try it. I hope I'll be able to join in- I have a skate Marathon right around the solstice, and then one in August. I wonder how well climbing mountains and skating go together... Guess I'll find out!

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...I tend to go for a more steady pace and take several quick water stops. I carry water bottle around my neck and that allows to me easily sip here and there. I've found that you want to drink water on a regular basis. This helps reduce dehydration and cramped legs...

Hey I would like to do Muir too!

 

EGH is right, constant hydration does reduce leg cramps.

 

I got tried of taking off my pack to retrieve my water bottle so I finally broke down and bought a hydration pack. They're only about $20-30.

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