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Coyote Spotted In My Local Woods.


Smaug1
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First of all, a grammar question: in my Topic Description, is 'effect' or 'affect' correct? I don't know why, but it bugs me not to know...

 

I live in flat Northern Illinois. The only good places to cache seem to be forest and nature preserves.

 

Actually, there is a nature preserve right next to my subdivision which I used to go hiking in at all hours.

 

My wife and a few other people in the neighborhood have spotted a coyote, which by all accounts is a monster. She said his head is about 6" above her hip level, and she's 5'6" tall.

 

Coyotes are new to me. My instinct is that they're pretty harmless to humans, kind of on the same level as a racoon or something. On the other hand, he is a monster, and these are probably lean times for him.

 

Should I avoid the woods altogether?

 

Not avoid & bring a good stick?

 

Not avoid & bring a 6" bladed Buck knife?

 

At times, I've been tempted to disobey the law and pack some heat in the form of my Glock, but I don't think Officer Friendly would believe my honorable intentions. (or care) I think he'd cart me off to jail cheerfully.

 

What would you all do?

 

Thanks for reading.

 

Jeremy

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Don't sweat it. It's about 1:00 AM here and I just walked inside from painting two ammo cans and heard some coyotes off in the distance. Odds are they'll never bother you unless you really tick 'em off. Since I often work late at night I see and hear 'em quite often.

 

As far as the "Officer Friendly" comment.... as an LEO I can only highly encourage you not to disobey your local laws.

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Again... I don't believe even a big coyote would attack a human, but Boy Scout training re being prepared couldn't hurt. I seriously doubt you'd need anything more than a good walking stick and an alert mind.

 

Anyway... to the first part of your question: If you remember 'affectation' as being "Assumed for Effect", it might help you keep them straight. A man might 'affect' a British accent if he thinks the 'effects' on a lady might be favorable.

 

Rat

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I don't know if they're different where you are but I see them regularly here. They avoid humans and I've never heard of them being an issue with anything that weighed more than about 20 pounds. I don't think twice about them, except that I do like to see them.

 

If they worry you, I would check with others (park rangers are usually a good source) in your area and see if there is any cause for concern.

 

There are plenty of critters out there - including the two-legged varieties - so it's prudent to remain alert when you're out and about. That's a big coyote if the size is accurate. If it was instead a wild dog or a wolf I'd be a bit more wary.

 

A coyote next to a subdivision usually is bad news for smaller outdoor pets like houecats...

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I've seen coyotes at noon from my window along a popular hiking trail. They were sitting on the old railbed watching people walk by. They eat cats (a lot of missing cat signs in the area) but the only time they have gone towards people in the area (SF bay area) was towards small kids and the coyote had signs of starvation. This was in the summer.

I'm more concerned with mountain lions in my area.

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First of all, check and see if you find any non-cache boxes labelled "ACME" nearby. If so, the coyote might be using any one of a variety of gadgets that may explode at any time. Exercise caution. Also, if you happen to hear a "MEEP MEEP" sound, you are dangerously near the coyote's prey. You'd be advised to take shelter immediately as you could accidentally wander into the path of falling boulders from cliff escarpments.

 

But seriously...just think of "special effects". EFFECT is more commonly a noun, whereas AFFECT is more commonly a verb. There are exceptions, but it's a good rule of thumb.

 

HTH! :o

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I've been 20 feet from three coyote. They simply sauntered away from my barking dog like they owned the place. No worries there.

 

I imagine in large quantities they might get brave, or if one is rabid there might be a problem.

 

A much bigger worry is coy dogs. Kill them on sight. Just make sure they are really coy dogs and not some idiot who walks his dog without a leash.

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Coyotes are fairly common here in nebraska. I've been out camping dozens of times and had them within a baseball's throw of camp. Most of the time when I've seen them i'm sure i've probably intersected one of their trails to their surprise. I've only heard of one experience where they caused trouble. They were trying to get into my friends dog kennel and get the dog food, it made his dogs make quite a bit of noise. I was down in Arizona camping once and had one come right into camp and start digging through our garbage as we were sitting around the camp fire. Evidently that was nothing new for that particular coyote, he didn't seem to mind us to much. We were staying in an all year round campground that was always full of snow-birds so it didn't surprise me much. ....and back to your question; I wouldn't worry about the coyotes. I'm more afraid of wild dog packs and mountain lions. I believe everybody should always carry a knife with them for any type of hike. Not only protection (which is the least reason I carry a knife), but for the usefulness it may present itself during a survival situation.

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Coyotes are not a threat to humans, they are basically scared dogs. Wolves, which some states are reintroducing and mountain lions are a different story.

 

Wolves hunt in packs and have no/little fear of humans. Mountain lions generally stay away from adults, but have been known to attack unattended kids.

 

Coyotes are not a threat. If you see one and don't want it around you yell at it and it will run away. Coyotes are no more a threat than deer.

 

Again, mountain lions and wolf packs are a different story.

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We are awash in coyotes in this area of eastern oregon. they have never bothered anyone around here that i know of, and believe me i would have heard of it as that is part of my 'job'. personally, i like them. they are called God's Dogs by the local Indians.

 

enjoy the fact they haven't been hunted out of existence in your area, and that will be a sad day.

 

by the way, there has never been a recorded instance of a wolf attacking a human being unless either threatened (they will run if possible) or sick, which is rare. packs or not, they will not attack you. this is easily verified - google it.

 

but yes, mountain lions, cougers, panthers, whatever you want to call them will stalk and attack a human. not often, but they have done so. i saw one about a month ago in the trees at our mountain place, he just stood there and looked at me. i was the first one to leave with that feeling of something staring at me all the way back to the rig. yes, i carry while caching (and at work).

Edited by cuff&stuff
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Well first, you gotta move out of the state. There is no legal way you will ever carry that Glock in Illinois. I'm sure violent crime in Chicago has been eliminated because of that, right? :D

But I digress.......

Coyotes are pretty common here, and what everyone says is generally true. I do want to point out a few things. They are wild animals. They are wild animals that are losiing their fear of humans. Any animal can be dangerous, especially if they are sick or injured. Someone said they are as safe as deer. That's probably right, but deer do occasionally attack people. In other words, don't stop hiking and geocaching, but do be aware of your surroundings. In reality, you're probably much more likely to get attacked by a wild dog then a coyote, but anything is possible and it doesn't hurt to be prepared.

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She said his head is about 6" above her hip level, and she's 5'6" tall.

 

Coyote Vital Statics

Weight: 15-45 lbs.

Length with tail: 40-60"

Shoulder Height: 15-20"

 

A large male gray wolf may be as tall as 3 feet at the shoulder and weigh more than 100 pounds. Female gray wolves tend to be smaller than the males.

 

I don't think coyotes get as tall as your wife says. I have a pair living near my house and the male is not that much taller than the above-mentioned description.

 

Coyotes are not a threat to humans, they are basically scared dogs.

 

In most cases, single and pairs of coyotes will run anway when confronted by humans. A blanket statement that they are no threat to humans, is baseless.

 

Do a yahoo, or google search of "coyote attacks + humans" and read the results. They can be dangerous.

Edited by Kit Fox
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From an article in a Lancaster, PA paper a few days ago:

 

she witnessed several growling coyotes chase her 14-year-old son across the family’s front lawn one night, stopping at the flower bed as the terrified boy leaped onto the front porch.
Residents have seen up to seven coyotes at a time. Other unconfirmed reports place bands at 14 and even 20.

Several weeks ago, near Safe Harbor, he caught a 7-foot-long, 82-pound male coyote, almost double the size of an average male in Pennsylvania, according to the Pennsylvania Game Commission.

 

“I’m telling you, you can’t tell it from a wolf. I didn’t know they grew that large,” says Fry.”

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It was NOT a coyote if it was as tall as you say, approximately 36 inches. It was most likely a feral dog. I have had coyotes as pets and they are great animals. They would only be a danger to a small child if there is little food and there is a pack of coyotes but this is very very very rare. Now in California a few years ago there were 3 packs of Chiwawa, you know the midget dog, of approximately 50 animals in each pack. So puppy farm had let the dogs go and there were about 150 dog roaming the hills in California. They were reported to bring down some largish animals. Ol well have fun.

cheers

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QUOTE 

Several weeks ago, near Safe Harbor, he caught a 7-foot-long, 82-pound male coyote, almost double the size of an average male in Pennsylvania, according to the Pennsylvania Game Commission.

 

“I’m telling you, you can’t tell it from a wolf. I didn’t know they grew that large,” says Fry.”

 

 

7 feet long! That's not a coyote. That's an alligator! Holy cow!

 

I've seen several wolves, some up pretty close ... a 7 footer is big! I've never seen a coyote anywhere close to that. Maybe it was the long-tailed version. :D

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Unless the coyotes have been hand-fed or somehow "domesticated", you shouldn't worry. They're moving back in around where I live and, yes, some small dogs and cats have disappeared. That's prob'ly why people get a bit edgy about them. I once came across 3 of them on a trail; they were about 25 feet away. One was sitting and the other 2 milling around and watching me. I watched them too but just went on my way. They watched and I walked... no problems. That's why I have this screen name -- because ever since that experience it's been kind of a human-animal mutual respect!

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Coyote are generally much smaller than what you describe. Around where I live (Panhandle of Nebraska and eastern Wyoming) they are seen quite common while geocaching. I have seen them within 20 feet of me and even spooked one that was sleeping next to a cache one time (or he spooked me). Mopar gave good advice - they are wild aniumals and generally pose no threat but you should be cautious. Coyote also tend to run in small packs (family units) so where you see one it is quite possible that others aren't too far away. I carry a diablo geocaching walking stick but have only used it to nudge away a snake one time - far greater hazard than coyotes.

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Well first, you gotta move out of the state. There is no legal way you will ever carry that Glock in Illinois. I'm sure violent crime in Chicago has been eliminated because of that, right? :D

But I digress.......

 

Yes, you did. Anyone watching the news out of Chicago (or lived there) realizes that Coyotes are not much of a threat. Now suburbanites thinking they are safe outside the city have been known to suffer violence at the hands of friends, neighbors, and strangers at a much higher rate than Coyotes.

 

The comment about wild dogs is correct- they can be dangerous.

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You should be happy the Coyote's are in your area. They won't hurt you... Chances are they are better fed than we are right now. You'd need to be half dead already before they would do anything... Maybe you'd even need to be on your last breath before they would come down on you...

 

As for the Glock, don't pack a firearm unless you have a permit. If you have a permit or not, don't discharge your weapon, especially in the dark. If you draw a firearm it better be for a good reason like to save your life and drawing on a Coyote doesn't really meet that need. Even then everything will change from that point forward... Example 1: LEO's see you moving around with a drawn firearm = Lots of trouble. Example 2: LEO's are checking out complaints of a gun shot in the area and they find/see you. See example 1. Example 3: 1 and 2 above are bad enough but let me find you walking around with a firearm (day or night) and chances are you'll most likely see mine drawn and pointed at you. The only difference is mine will be out with every intention of protecting myself or my family and I would never draw my firearm unless I intended to fire it. Also, where is that bullet going to go when you fire the pistol? Someone's house? Hit a kid? I'll bet you anything it won't hit the Coyote. And for arguments sake, have you ever fired on a moving target? Especially one so small, low to the ground and faster than you by 4 fold? My point is, be careful with your pistol. Your statement may have been in jest but others may read it as something more serious in nature and become alarmed.

Edited by The Foster Clan
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We recently had a coyote here in metro Atlanta challenge a man walking his dog on a popular hiking/biking trail within a National Recreation Area. This area happens to be where I placed my second geocache. It charged at the dog and the man put his leg out to protect his pet. It bit his leg. He grabbed the coyote and held it and called 911. It had rabies. He is in treatment.

 

Be careful of wild animals and give them respect. You never know. With everyone saying they are harmless I wanted to put one thought in the back of our mind... you never know. A stick and an yelling at them with an offensive tone can keep them at bay. A stick will give you some defense in case of a situation like this.

 

Give them distance and give them respect but don't be afraid to enjoy the beauty of an animal in the wild. Instances like this are few and far between, but they can happen.

A Cobb County man was bitten by a rabid coyote while walking in an east Cobb park, police said today.

 

The 62-year-old man, whom police did not identify, was walking Sunday in Sope Creek Park near Paper Mill Road with his dog when the coyote attacked, said police spokesman Cpl. Dana Pierce.

 

The man was able to grab the animal by the neck and hold it until a Cobb animal control officer arrived in response to a 911 cellphone call, Pierce said.

 

State laboratory tests performed on the animal returned to Cobb police today showed the animal was rabid, Pierce said. The victim had already started a series of "post exposure rabies shots," Pierce said.

 

Signs will be posted in the park, which is part of Chattahoochee River National Recreation Area, said Ranger Bob Gamble.

 

The man's quick action may have prevented additional injuries, said Cobb Animal Control Assistant Manager Cindy Franklin.

 

"This brave act by one of our Cobb County citizens made testing a possibility," Franklin said. "By removing this animal from the area, it may have helped save another citizen from a future attack."

 

I like a collapsible baton, but it is a classified as a weapon. Don't put it in your pocket because it would be considered a concealed weapon. Just hold it in your hand or put on in a holster on your belt. I have used mine twice while walking my dog and when other dogs see it they back down (not struck any dog -- one time "threw it out" to stop 3 dogs coming at me and used it once to to nudge one dog away from my dog).

phoenixbaton.jpg

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I've never been afraid of coyotes. They are always more scared of me than I am of them. The coyotes in this area run at the sight of a human. This is the boonies of Kansas, and the coyotes are even in the yard at night. Anyway, in 30 years of very close proximity to lots of coyotes, I've never been bothered by them.

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I don't know about this, but my father inlaw said the wildlife commission is thinking of - or has - imposing a bounty on coyotes in ohio. I havent heard anyhing else, but i guess the coyote population is on a sharp rise in NE ohio. He is not sure if a hunting license is/would be required for coyotes.

 

Again, i did not hear it from an official source, so please consider it hearsay myth until it can be proven :D .

 

edit:

BTW ---- I am NOT in anyway advocating his stance, just enlightening you as to what i heard.

Edited by TruFinds
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Coyotes like to eat pets. Otherwise they are really not a concern. I only ever heard of one sick coyote biting a human at a campsite years ago -- and, given it was a National Park and densely camped, I suspect it was a wildlife feeding issue (here, funny doggy....here's a snacky-snack).

 

Anyhow, I live on the edge of an urban park with at least one active coyote pack. Most of my caches are in that park and I have never had any problems. I did once see a great cache hiding spot, until I realized it was their den -- so I avoid a small area around that opening. They might get fussy if they have pups.

 

Otherwise -- enjoy them -- they are very neat animals. My dog even got a bonus rabbit leg to eat once when we came across a kill site of theirs. Funny story -- but not for now.

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I once came across 3 of them on a trail; they were about 25 feet away.  One was sitting and the other 2 milling around and watching me.  I watched them too but just went on my way.  They watched and I walked... no problems.

Wow, I had that exact same experience in Denali National Park a few years back . . . except the three animals that looked up at me from 20-25 ft away, and didn't seem too concerned, were a big sow grizzly and two spring cubs. Oops.

 

Maybe I should change my screen name? :D

 

More on topic, in Vancouver BC, we had coyote's in one of the parks near our house and there was an instance where a 5 yr old kid was grabbed and being drug off by one of the coyotes, but with parental intervention, it all ended okay. I've never heard of an instance of healthy coyotes causing any problems with adults.

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I have coyotes in the woods where I live and they never bother me. They eat only stray dogs and cats and anything else they can get there hands on. The pack of about 7 that live near us have never even snarled at a human and always stay far back in the woods. If one does decide to attack you or snarl all you need is a decent sized rock or go to on the web and find a gas blowback airsoft pistol. That is what I carry when I walk my dog in the neighborhood and one shot with one of those guns will turn back just about anything.

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Coyotes in flat Northern Illinois? I can't go camping with the cub scout pack in any State Park in northern Illinois and NOT hear coyotes howling at night. I've seen evidence of them, and as suburbia sprawls its urban tentacles into their habitat, I'm sure they're spotted more often. But I have yet to have one that didn't run like the dickens every time I approached - even in a non-threatening way.

 

If you're really concerned, a big thick walking stick might do the trick. If you're really really concerned, maybe a nail through the bottom perpendicular to the shaft?

 

But for me - I'm not worried about coyotes.

Edited by Markwell
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Uhg, I don't want to get into any sort of weapons debate, but please, PLEASE check your local laws before carrying an expandable baton, airsoft pistol, or any other weapon. For example, I know ASP style batons are illegal to possess in California, and in NJ if you want to carry that airsoft pistol legally while walking the dog you need the exact same permit that is required for you to carry a 9mm semi-automatic pistol.

Some places have some pretty hokey rules. Here in CT, to carry a stun gun you must have both a concealed weapon permit (like is required for a handgun) AND a dangerous weapons permit. Some places outlaw pepper spray.

Just because you can buy this stuff easily off the internet doesn't always make it legal where you live.

 

If you are carrying any sort of banned weapon for protection, you're more likely to end up arrested for carrying it then to have to actually use it in defense against an animal.

Edited by Mopar
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Uhg, I don't want to get into any sort of weapons debate, but please, PLEASE check your local laws before carrying an expandable baton, airsoft pistol, or any other weapon. For example, I know ASP style batons are illegal to possess in California, and in NJ if you want to carry that airsoft pistol legally while walking the dog you need the exact same permit that is required for you to carry a 9mm semi-automatic pistol.

Some places have some pretty hokey rules. Here in CT, to carry a stun gun you must have both a concealed weapon permit (like is required for a handgun) AND a dangerous weapons permit. Some places outlaw pepper spray.

Just because you can buy this stuff easily off the internet doesn't always make it legal where you live.

 

If you are carrying any sort of banned weapon for protection, you're more likely to end up arrested for carrying it then to have to actually use it in defense against an animal.

No, NO!! we won't go there!!

 

I was just interpreting the severity of our coyote problem here.

 

I guess it must be bad enough that thinning the pouplation is to be rewarded by placing a bounty for killing a coyote.

 

I don't agree with it at all or advocate it, just trying to describe the severity of the coyote population in a seemingly unlikely area.

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A coyote's main diet is mice, rats, and rabbits. They're actually good to have around, and are never dangerous unless rabid. They commonly live very close to cities, and I hear them regularly on the Galveston, TX airport. I've come upon them unexpectedly in the field, and in every case they run away, at least far enough to see if I have a gun. They can tell if you're carrying a rifle or shotgun, and if not may not run as far as fast, but they will avoid you if it's at all possible.

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Coyotes, at least the ones here in Arizona, are not the least bit threatening to a full-grown human. They do pet dogs and cats left outside at night, but they are shy around people. I frequently encounter coyotes on my walks to work around sunrise. Other than being startled to see me, they display no interest much less aggression. I have never heard of a coyote attacking a human.

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If you have one in your neighborhood, read the coyote cautions on the coyote link, and you might want to share that with your neighbors.

coy5a.jpg

Coyote

 

hunt.jpg

Wolf

 

Then you have your Coydog, dogote, coywolf, and wolfdog

 

Coyote Comparisons

The Gray Wolf, (Canis lupus) once shared much of the same range as the Coyote and belongs to the same Genus -- Canis. But the wolf is usually larger and darker in appearance.

 

Coyotes also carry their tails quite differently than wolves. A Coyote's tail is normally held down, although not between the legs. A wolf carries its tail rather horizontally.

 

The nearly successful attempts to exterminate the Gray Wolf (the Coyote's primary predator) has been largely responsible for the Coyote's great expansion across the American continent.

 

As far as what would I do? Make sure my batteries in my camera were fresh. Make noise, carry a whistle. Keep pepper spray if you're worried, and if your laws allow it. We have lots of coyotes in CT. I rarely see any. I followed one down the road one night, and Ttepee may have seen one while we were caching one day, but I missed it, and she's not quite sure what it was. Saw a mountain lion once, on a pwer line trail, and tried following it, but the bazillion deer ticks scared us out of there.

Edited by Planet
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First of all, a grammar question: in my Topic Description, is 'effect' or 'affect' correct? I don't know why, but it bugs me not to know...

 

I live in flat Northern Illinois. The only good places to cache seem to be forest and nature preserves.

 

Actually, there is a nature preserve right next to my subdivision which I used to go hiking in at all hours.

 

My wife and a few other people in the neighborhood have spotted a coyote, which by all accounts is a monster. She said his head is about 6" above her hip level, and she's 5'6" tall.

 

Coyotes are new to me. My instinct is that they're pretty harmless to humans, kind of on the same level as a racoon or something. On the other hand, he is a monster, and these are probably lean times for him.

 

Should I avoid the woods altogether?

 

Not avoid & bring a good stick?

 

Not avoid & bring a 6" bladed Buck knife?

 

At times, I've been tempted to disobey the law and pack some heat in the form of my Glock, but I don't think Officer Friendly would believe my honorable intentions. (or care) I think he'd cart me off to jail cheerfully.

 

What would you all do?

 

Thanks for reading.

 

Jeremy

Anytime I have ever ran into a coyote in the woods there has ended up being one less coyote in the woods when I left .....

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In all seriousness, if it was a coyote it would probably not attack. Coyote attacks are possible if the animal feels cornered or if it sees no other way. They will generally retreat if possible. Now if it was not a Coyote and was a Ferral Dog, I might be a little more concerned contrary to what some have said. I have seen some very aggressive Ferral Dogs that will attack just about anything. And also, Coyotes don't just eat small pets. If they did, Ranchers around here wouldn't be begging hunters to help them kill them. They can and do kill larger animals such as Calves and Smaller deer. Seen this one myself.

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Not avoid & bring a good stick?

 

Not avoid & bring a 6" bladed Buck knife?

 

We carry hiking sticks most of the time. If you do not have a stick in our 'neck of the woods' you can almost always find a cactus rib or a palo verde branch.

 

I take my four year old and eight year old out in the desert at night to cache and we have never once been bothered by coyotes. Arond here they are not much bigger then small dogs and they run in fear when they see/smell/hear you.

 

We have been followed by Javalina but they have never been aggressive. We worry about Lions and Rattlesnakes more then anything else. In Tucson a large part of one of the canyons was shut down because of mountain lions. I have never heard of a tril being closed because of coyotes.

 

As for the 6" knife idea?? I would prefer a 6' staff or a good rock over a 6" knife. I dont think I want to be that close to the teeth of anything that is trained by nature to hunt. A predator is going to know about the teeth of an enemy and you knife might not be much more to it then a mouth of another animal. If it attacks, it will move a good bit quicker then I think I could.

 

While on a night hike with a buddy we spotted two green eyes with our flashlights.. Judging the distance and height from the ground, it had to be a lion. We threw a few good softball sized rocks at it and the eyes did not even blink. About 2 minutes later they went away.. (We both had pistols, but we were not going to shoot unless it started coming close very quickly).

 

So I guess my personal response is the knife is good if it is a non-friendly person, but I would prefer something with a little more range when dealing with predators.

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I've run into coyotes up north in Michigan, usually very small (25 lbs?) and not to keen on hanging around humans. I am far more afraid of snakes than of something that weighs less than my backpack. But keep a keen eye, they've apparently been known to grow to 7 feet?!?!(as stated eary in this thread) glandular problems?

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First of all, check and see if you find any non-cache boxes labelled "ACME" nearby. If so, the coyote might be using any one of a variety of gadgets that may explode at any time. Exercise caution. Also, if you happen to hear a "MEEP MEEP" sound, you are dangerously near the coyote's prey. You'd be advised to take shelter immediately as you could accidentally wander into the path of falling boulders from cliff escarpments.

Classic! Watch out for them on roller skates with rockets tied to their back.

 

:(

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Smaug,

I think we are caching in the same zip code. Maybe we'll meet on the trail. I hope you aren't packing heat.

 

I've never had a problem with coyotes, but here are a few suggestions.

Carry a stick. Carry pepper spray. Tie bells on your pack strap or jacket to alert animals. They will hear you coming and leave before you see them. Of course, then you'll never even see a chipmunk.

Better to be aware of your surroundings. Watch for signs. Coyote scat looks a lot like dog poop. Wolf scat looks like dog poop, but smells of pepper spray and has little bells in it.

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