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What to carry in your backpack?


azog
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quote:
Originally posted by FLEABANDIT:

... but by the time I get home, the inside of my pick up cab looks like a tornado hit it. Things everywhere. I must be the messiest cacher alive. I'm surprised everything doesn't fall out when i open the door at the gas station. Am I the only one like this? icon_biggrin.gif

 


 

The lil Otter has been known to forget stuff on the trail(glasses, cell phone, gps), so at least take comfort in the knowledge that your stuff made it to the truck.

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quote:
Originally posted by FLEABANDIT:

... but by the time I get home, the inside of my pick up cab looks like a tornado hit it. Things everywhere. I must be the messiest cacher alive. I'm surprised everything doesn't fall out when i open the door at the gas station. Am I the only one like this? icon_biggrin.gif

 


 

The lil Otter has been known to forget stuff on the trail(glasses, cell phone, gps), so at least take comfort in the knowledge that your stuff made it to the truck.

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quote:
Originally posted by Christian Walker:

quote:
I have not had any problems when Geocaching but I plan ahead. I know some people will freek about the gun thing, But it does not go on cach hunts in areas with a lot of people like in the city or parks, only when out in the woods. icon_smile.gif

 

That doesn't sound strange to me at all. The only reason I carry my own weapon (SW 908) is to defend against dogs who want to bite either myself, my family, or my own pup. For what it's worth, I only carry in remote areas.


 

The remote areas are where you are probably safer. If you don't believe it, take a stroll around some big cities, like Bowie, MD and Washington, DC. I just can't get it... Those two places have the most restrictive gun laws in the country, and look at what is happenning. Here in Texas, everyone has a gun, and crime is 55% less???? Could it be that they KNOW they wouldn't stand a chance here? Maybe they just like the areas where the Govt supplies them with plenty of unarmed victims. The 32 ounces my KP-89 and 33 rounds of ammo put on my hip is 32 oz I gladly pack along. YMMV. I like my mileage just fine.

 

Out here, you got to understand, EVERYTHING is 5 miles away except what you bring with you. And you are likely on your own for quite some time if you need help. A good friend is the first thing to take. after that.... all of the listed items can be useful. One I didn't see was a rescue strobe. Runs for hours and hours off of one D-cell, and can be seen at night for 50 miles or more.

 

BTW, I leave bottled water at EVERY cache, just for the easterners that are caching through.

 

Mike. KD9KC.

El Paso, Texas.

 

Citizens of this land may own guns. Not to threaten their neighbors, but to ensure themselves of liberty and freedom.

 

They are not assault weapons anymore... they are HOMELAND DEFENSE WEAPONS!

 

[This message was edited by KD9KC on October 08, 2002 at 05:47 PM.]

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quote:
Originally posted by Christian Walker:

quote:
I have not had any problems when Geocaching but I plan ahead. I know some people will freek about the gun thing, But it does not go on cach hunts in areas with a lot of people like in the city or parks, only when out in the woods. icon_smile.gif

 

That doesn't sound strange to me at all. The only reason I carry my own weapon (SW 908) is to defend against dogs who want to bite either myself, my family, or my own pup. For what it's worth, I only carry in remote areas.


 

The remote areas are where you are probably safer. If you don't believe it, take a stroll around some big cities, like Bowie, MD and Washington, DC. I just can't get it... Those two places have the most restrictive gun laws in the country, and look at what is happenning. Here in Texas, everyone has a gun, and crime is 55% less???? Could it be that they KNOW they wouldn't stand a chance here? Maybe they just like the areas where the Govt supplies them with plenty of unarmed victims. The 32 ounces my KP-89 and 33 rounds of ammo put on my hip is 32 oz I gladly pack along. YMMV. I like my mileage just fine.

 

Out here, you got to understand, EVERYTHING is 5 miles away except what you bring with you. And you are likely on your own for quite some time if you need help. A good friend is the first thing to take. after that.... all of the listed items can be useful. One I didn't see was a rescue strobe. Runs for hours and hours off of one D-cell, and can be seen at night for 50 miles or more.

 

BTW, I leave bottled water at EVERY cache, just for the easterners that are caching through.

 

Mike. KD9KC.

El Paso, Texas.

 

Citizens of this land may own guns. Not to threaten their neighbors, but to ensure themselves of liberty and freedom.

 

They are not assault weapons anymore... they are HOMELAND DEFENSE WEAPONS!

 

[This message was edited by KD9KC on October 08, 2002 at 05:47 PM.]

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quote:
Originally posted by FLEABANDIT:

OK, I take the same stuff everyone else does, but I have a question that relates to this topic. When I leave for geocaching everything is neat in my backpack and I look like a good little girlscout but by the time I get home, the inside of my pick up cab looks like a tornado hit it. Things everywhere. I must be the messiest cacher alive. I'm surprised everything doesn't fall out when i open the door at the gas station. Am I the only one like this? icon_biggrin.gif

 

LIVE FOR TODAY!


 

It could be a Michigan thing because I'm the same way. I have the printed out cache pages all over the place, power cords for the GPSr's are like spaghetti all over the floor and passenger seat. Backpack and gear falling out all over the place. Old REI bags in the backseat of my truck because I couldn't bring them in the house because they would give away that I got something new for geocaching. Map printouts from other missions scattered about. Yeah now that you mention it I feel like a sloppy HoBo living out of my truck. Scary.

 

______________________________________________________________________________________

Confused New Owner Of a Garmin GPS V Received on 10-03-02

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quote:
Originally posted by FLEABANDIT:

OK, I take the same stuff everyone else does, but I have a question that relates to this topic. When I leave for geocaching everything is neat in my backpack and I look like a good little girlscout but by the time I get home, the inside of my pick up cab looks like a tornado hit it. Things everywhere. I must be the messiest cacher alive. I'm surprised everything doesn't fall out when i open the door at the gas station. Am I the only one like this? icon_biggrin.gif

 

LIVE FOR TODAY!


 

It could be a Michigan thing because I'm the same way. I have the printed out cache pages all over the place, power cords for the GPSr's are like spaghetti all over the floor and passenger seat. Backpack and gear falling out all over the place. Old REI bags in the backseat of my truck because I couldn't bring them in the house because they would give away that I got something new for geocaching. Map printouts from other missions scattered about. Yeah now that you mention it I feel like a sloppy HoBo living out of my truck. Scary.

 

______________________________________________________________________________________

Confused New Owner Of a Garmin GPS V Received on 10-03-02

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When I go geocaching, I take my backpack and a walking stick.

 

My pack has items such as a snake bite kit, a whistle, my cell phone, water, toliet paper, a rain poncho, a flashlight, pocket knife, trash bags, extra batteries, GPSer, compass, clipboard w/ cache page(s), band aids w/ointment, surveyers tape (for when I hide caches), my walkman, DEET, sunscreen lotion, binoculars (to look @ birds, etc.), and goodies for trade.

 

See ya on the trail!

 

[This message was edited by pack and stick on October 28, 2002 at 11:30 AM.]

 

[This message was edited by pack and stick on October 28, 2002 at 05:10 PM.]

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Im suprised that all through that thread there are only about 3 instances where people bring the silver Space blanket...For only 2-4 bucks, they are a definate livesaver...from Keeping you dry if its raining, to keeping warm, even in the middle of a sudden snow storm (ok, you gotta plan these things in Michigans Upper Peninsulaicon_wink.gif)

 

migo_sig_logo.jpg

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Jamie,

 

There is nothing so over rated as sex and so under rated as a good bowel movement! I had one of our Doc's where I work tell me that one day at lunch. He also ask me if I would rather have good sex or a good bowel movement. Well, had I been asked that question some years back, my response would have been, SEX! But, I'm older now.... icon_biggrin.gif

 

Archie, give me a good bowel movement, DH icon_eek.gif

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quote:
That doesn't sound strange to me at all. The only reason I carry my own weapon (SW 908) is to defend against dogs who want to bite either myself, my family, or my own pup. For what it's worth, I only carry in remote areas.

 

careful with the dogs and guns. i carry legally 24/7 for employment reasons. dogs are very hard to hit. carry a small co2 fire extinguisher.. dogs can't attack through the spray, and will turn and back down.. i promise you this. pepper spray and co2.

 

as far as the gun goes, i carry always in remote areas.

 

i am new to geocaching but have hiked for eons----

 

as far as gear - duct tape and bailing wire can fix anything.

flashlights

first aid - "A" bag.

benedryl is a must

water, and more water.

spare lensatic compass and a primary

always local and topos

energy - power bars and or trail foods.

stobe - military blink light.

3 pencil flares (boat kit)

waterproof matches in case

duct tape

wire

ponchos 2 - military style.

--- could live under these for a long time.

knife - utility style is all i feel is necessary. my partner carries a machete in his pack - gets weird looks - lol - but it is useful at times.

socks, and underwear - yep.

------feet---------

benzoine tincture - and a small syringe. -- its an old special forces, and ranger thing.. but i digress.

 

foot powder

bandaids

moleskin

-------------------

bagbalm

paracord 500ft.

 

i can become self sufficient at this level

 

.38 S&W Centennial.

 

end of list

 

a few other items make it in

snivel gear - rain gear and such

cellphone - always off full battery.

batteries, batteries, batteries.

whisper light white gas stove

coleman fuel

ramen

 

i am also looking to buy an iSun 12v solar kit. really small solar power unit!!!!

 

robbie

 

- you must think i am a lunatic at this point. anyone want to go caching???

 

icon_eek.gificon_eek.gificon_eek.gificon_eek.gif

 

wings_flag.gif

"Fire burns, and when it rains... you get wet."

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One thing missing from everyone's list - dogtags. Preferably with your name, phone #, Dr's name, phone #. Say you are out and go down for any reason, someone finds you, manages to get you out and an ambulance or medivac chopper picks you up. Are they going to know who you are?

 

Even if you have your wallet on you, they know your name, but still don't know what Dr to call to get your records, allergies, problem conditions...

 

Always go hiking with someone you know? Neighbor perhaps? Does he know your Dr? Do you know his? A dogtag will almost always be with you even if you lose most everything else. In an emergency it can be a lifesaver.

 

There's even a site that sells a polished tag with laser engraving on one side with all kinds of space for info. On the other side you can get a compass or other stuff engraved. (Though if you were hardcore, you'd get the Geocaching logo engraved.)

 

Just some sites:

 

www.id-ideas.com

www.roadid.com

www.smartidtag.com

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Everybody has a good idea about what to take for his or her particular needs,But please leave a note on your vehicle as to where you might be,even if it;s just the coordinates.

You may have the best packed bag in the world,and it would be of no use if you wound up sepparated from it in an accident.

I used to have four full sized topo maps in a frame on the porch of my cabin ,and put a push pin in the area I was heading.just to let someone know where i was if i didnt show up

.

Frank

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My RidgeRunner starts out with one tray of ice into the 100 oz. bladder full of water, one survival radio (battery, solar, handcrank powered), TP, Bushnell 10X42's, GPS, whistle, kodak DX4900, pens and paper on small clipboard, and my id and carkeys, cellphone, and best of all: the Stainless Steel Schrade Extreme Survival Knife its a sweet treat for whatever wants to bug you in the woods.

 

I'LL BE WATCHING FOR YOU FROM WITHIN THE TREES.

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As a newbie, I've been monitoring this thread with much interest. I've seen where some geocache'rs carry "Lightsticks". Well the other day I was at one of these "Hardcore, Y2K" military surplus outlets, and I picked up some military version "lightsticks". I must say that I was quite inpressed with the sticks. Although they did not provide enough light to navigate by, they did light/glow my nightstand(I put it there to keep a eye on it during the night)........(44hrs go by)........The stick is still glowing faintly! and it's only supposed to be an 8hr stick. Needless to say, I put a few in my Geocache'ing LBV*.

 

Garminator

 

* Load Bearing Vest

 

"I seen Elvis making crop circles"......................Are the Soprano's on yet?

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I carry my GPS, my cache exchange stuff, and my

basic survival pack which includes:

 

-- 1 .45 automatic.

-- 2 boxes of ammunition.

-- 4 days' concentrated emergency rations.

-- 1 drug issue containing antibiotics, morphine, vitamin pills, pep pills, sleeping pills, tranquilizer pills.

-- 1 miniature combination Russian phrase book and Bible.

-- 100 dollars in rubles.

-- 100 dollars in gold.

-- 9 packs of chewing gum.

-- 1 issue of prophylactics.

-- 3 lipsticks.

-- 3 pairs of nylon stockings.

 

(My apologies to anyone who reads this and has not seen the movie Dr. Strangelove)

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Today I was in my folk's basement when I spied some surveyor flags -- little neon-orange triangles affixed to 18 inche stiff wires. You've probably seen utility companies use them to mark off gas lines and so forth.

 

Well, I grabbed one and put it in my pack. I plan on using it to mark the spot my GPS is telling me those hard to find caches are and use it as a reference point as I extend my search area.

 

Sure I could drop my pack and accomplish the same thing but the flag is so much cooler. icon_wink.gif

 

Jolly R. Blackburn

http://kenzerco.com

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