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What to carry in your backpack?


azog
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Camel backs are great, it's just they price them as though they used gold thread to sew them up with. (I got my camel back in Korea for twenty bucks.) There are several companies that make a similar product.

 

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What is the price of experience, do men buy it for a song,

Or wisdom for a dance in the street.................

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quote:
Originally posted by Acceptable Risk:

Speaking of packs... You guys those camel backs? I have a waist pack now that holds two water bottles but it's too small to carry all my stuff... I was looking at this one at REI...

 

http://www.rei.com/cgi-bin/ncommerce3/ProductDisplay?prmenbr=8000&prrfnbr=11472717

 

Decent deal or can I find one cheaper elsewhere?

 


 

We have one of the CamelBak RimRunners. It's a deceptively large pack. It'll hold 3 liters of water and all our gear. I can also easily squeeze an ammo can in it when we go out to drop a cache. It's nice to be able to hide the can in a pack so people can't see us carrying it. We bought it a few months ago when REI was having one of their sales. They had a deal that you could pick any one item in the store and get %20 off. Couple that with our rebate check and it was quite cheap.

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Thanks guys... I went tonight to grab the Rim Runner but while I was there, I saw a new one... The Blowfish... 100oz but it's a bit smaller. The main compartment has an outside zipper that lets it expand about 3" out... Absolutely badass...

 

http://www.camelbak.com/rec/cb_prod.cfm?product_id=147&CATID=6

 

dadgum this sport is addicting... I spend more time at REI than I do at home... I sprung for a trekking pole last week, and I love it...

 

geosig.jpg

Contents Under Pressure...

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I just started, and my husband thinks I'm being a paranoid girl-scout by carrying all this stuff with me, but here's what is in my pack:

 

flashlight

whistle

multi-tool thing

gps and compass

digital camera

cache goodies

trail mix

enough water for however long I think I'll be out, and then an extra bottle to be safe

first aid kit

allergy meds (Alabama has a large variety of weird bugs that I am very allergic to).

3 pairs socks (dry feet are happy, hiking feet)

sunscreen & bug spray

trash bags, for picking up litter, or an impromtu poncho if it rains

extra batteries

*a quick-dry towel.

*a hat, hair bands, and a comb

 

My husband thought the last 2 were girlish vanity, but if you have long hair, there is nothing crappier than slogging through the woods with your hair getting snagged in sticker bushes and spider webs, or trying to pull burrs and bugs out by hand. The quick-dry towel is kind of like a super-absorbent chamois, but it's really small. If you fall into a creek or you just get nasty-funky-sweaty, you can get pretty clean and dry without having to lug a big-*** towel around.

 

In the car I keep more water and food. I might be forgetting something, but I think that's it.

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Just some info for those buying the water bladders. As far as the actual bladder I've found none better then the safe water anywhere bladders.. The benefit of their bladders are that they're lined with an antibacterial/mold/mildew coating that makes them resistant to all the funk that likes to grow in bladders (otherwise you'll be bleaching, cleaning, drying, heck my dad even keeps his in the fridge when he's not using it to cut down on the mold and mildew, though the new camelbacks are easier to clean). In the 4 months that I travelled teh north and the last 2 months that I travelled the south I never cleaned the thing once or dried it. I'd hike through it in the truck with whatever water was in it, drive then pull it out and hike again. Often it went for days sitting in the cab with temps outside above 100 so it was a perfect breeding ground for funk and I never had a problem.

Even better (at least for me) was that there is an attachable in line water filter that you can buy. When your in the backcountry hook it in and your good to go.

 

"...Not all those who wander are lost..."

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Doesn't it matter how far you are hiking to the cache? Some days I take a backpack but found it bulky when going through the growth and trees. Not to mention heavy on hot days. Now I take a fanny type pack with a bottle of Gatorade, deep woods off, cache goodies, digital camera and flashlight. There have been times during the day I use the flashlight to look into trees etc for the cache. I'm still finding this bulky so now the Gatorade sits in the truck with the pack and I take the camera, goodies and my gps unit.

 

Now I mention distance since out of my 49 find most are within a 1/4 mile walking distance one way. I can't see carrying everything some of you take on that. Now if I was hiking the backwoods then yes I would carry those items.

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I'm sure you have realized now that this is a loaded question. When it comes to packs there will always be the lights vs. the heavies. Obviously you wouldn't need the same items for an urban cache as you would a deep woods cache. Take the modular approach. Here are my basics for any outing.

 

Camelbak pack (MULE)

Map of Area. (city or country you can still get lost)

small first aid kit. (Just Band aids etc.)

leatherman tool

power bars or snacks

Glucose tabs (I'm diabetic)

small flashlight

Emergency Contact Card

Whistle (call attention to yourself if necessary)

Bug spray

Sting stick

sunscreen

Pen

Sharpie marker

Notebook

Compass

AA Batteries (fit the flashlight & GPS)

Cache goodies

GPS

CellPhone (But don't rely on it)

 

Should I expect to travel into backcountry (my definition of backcountry is anywhere that is a two hour hike from help) I add this stuff organized in ziplocks:

 

Flagging tape (for trail marking)

10’ 3/16” rope (I have this wound around my walking stick

Jerky

Small bar soap

light sticks

waterproof matches

toilet paper

small towel

sunscreen

water purification tabs

 

Survival Book (small pocket edition of US Army survival Guide)

additional First aid supplies

Snake bite kit

Nu Skin

space blanket

 

fire starter

lighters

steel wool

garbage bags (doubles as a rain poncho)

 

Not to over stress this point:

Get a Map of Area & a Compass (Look at the area you’re traveling & note roads or landmarks in all directions. Get a sense of the area from the map and know that without a GPS you could walk to a road or landmark with a compass or by dead reckoning. A good exercise is to go into an area you are somewhat familiar with and turn off the GPS. After that see if you can find your way out. Do this several times. Develop a situational awareness of where you’ve come from and where you are.

Technology is a wonderful thing, I make my living by it, but I also know that it can fail you at the most inopportune times.

 

Happy Caching

 

Cachercarry

 

Lane

 

Jackson, MS

 

I'm here because I'm not all there

 

[This message was edited by cachercarry on July 22, 2002 at 06:43 PM.]

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My wife and I recently went on an 8 mile hike in Yosemite with my brother and sister-in-law. They live near the park and felt they knew what to pack better than us Texans.

 

They thought it was humorous that I brought a first aid kit, flashlight, toilet paper, EXTRA water, and extra food.

 

Well, the Boy Scout motto rang true on this trip. We ended up using EVERYTHING that I brought. The extra water came in real handy when they ran out!! The flashlight came in handy when we unexpectedly got caught on the trail after dark.

 

One other thing for you eyeglass wearers. I almost didn't take my regular glasses. Figured the sunglasses would be adequate for a "day hike." I was glad I had them after it got dark.

 

You can't take too much, but you can take too little. You never know what you might need.

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quote:
Originally posted by Team Golden:

Doesn't it matter how far you are hiking to the cache? Some days I take a backpack but found it bulky when going through the growth and trees. Not to mention heavy on hot days. Now I take a fanny type pack with a bottle of Gatorade, deep woods off, cache goodies, digital camera and flashlight. There have been times during the day I use the flashlight to look into trees etc for the cache. I'm still finding this bulky so now the Gatorade sits in the truck with the pack and I take the camera, goodies and my gps unit.

 

Now I mention distance since out of my 49 find most are within a 1/4 mile walking distance one way. I can't see carrying everything some of you take on that. Now if I was hiking the backwoods then yes I would carry those items.


 

The distance isn't the issue, but the traffic through the area. There are some places that you can be only 100 ft from the road, but if no one ever comes down that road, you are S.O.L. if you get hurt or sick. If I am hiking someplace that I know people come by in case I need help, then I don't bring very much, (just cache goodies, allergy meds, and water). But if it's a desolate area, I bring everything.

 

It just comes down to knowing the area you're in, and not assuming that, (for example), because a cache is located in a state park, you'll be super-safe. Not all walks in the park are a walk in the park, if you know what I mean. icon_wink.gif

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quote:
Originally posted by Team Golden:

Doesn't it matter how far you are hiking to the cache? Some days I take a backpack but found it bulky when going through the growth and trees. Not to mention heavy on hot days. Now I take a fanny type pack with a bottle of Gatorade, deep woods off, cache goodies, digital camera and flashlight. There have been times during the day I use the flashlight to look into trees etc for the cache. I'm still finding this bulky so now the Gatorade sits in the truck with the pack and I take the camera, goodies and my gps unit.

 

Now I mention distance since out of my 49 find most are within a 1/4 mile walking distance one way. I can't see carrying everything some of you take on that. Now if I was hiking the backwoods then yes I would carry those items.


 

The distance isn't the issue, but the traffic through the area. There are some places that you can be only 100 ft from the road, but if no one ever comes down that road, you are S.O.L. if you get hurt or sick. If I am hiking someplace that I know people come by in case I need help, then I don't bring very much, (just cache goodies, allergy meds, and water). But if it's a desolate area, I bring everything.

 

It just comes down to knowing the area you're in, and not assuming that, (for example), because a cache is located in a state park, you'll be super-safe. Not all walks in the park are a walk in the park, if you know what I mean. icon_wink.gif

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quote:
Originally posted by JAR:

"Porgie Tirebiter,

He's a spy and a girl delighter!

Orgie, firefighter,

Just a student like you!"

So, majicman, you thought your FT reference would go unnoticed?

 

Shoes for Industry!


 

HEY! That's my boy you're talking about!

 

Ahhh, that son of mine.

-He's not your son Fred.

Stop torturing me, Ethyl...

And stop calling me Fred, my name's Adolph!

 

EXCELLENT to see some FT followers in here!

 

George Leroy Tirebiter (Movie star)

 

More Sugar!!

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What I take but leave in car...

- Bug Repelant (the off botanicals works wonders!)

 

What I take with me in my camera bag or purse...

-About 3 small items

-cache printout (or scrap paper with notes)

 

I have run out of easy caches so here in a bit I will carry a gps in my hands.

 

I don't even see the reasoning behind a backpack personally.

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quote:
I have not had any problems when Geocaching but I plan ahead. I know some people will freek about the gun thing, But it does not go on cach hunts in areas with a lot of people like in the city or parks, only when out in the woods. icon_smile.gif

 

That doesn't sound strange to me at all. The only reason I carry my own weapon (SW 908) is to defend against dogs who want to bite either myself, my family, or my own pup. For what it's worth, I only carry in remote areas.

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quote:
I have not had any problems when Geocaching but I plan ahead. I know some people will freek about the gun thing, But it does not go on cach hunts in areas with a lot of people like in the city or parks, only when out in the woods. icon_smile.gif

 

That doesn't sound strange to me at all. The only reason I carry my own weapon (SW 908) is to defend against dogs who want to bite either myself, my family, or my own pup. For what it's worth, I only carry in remote areas.

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A whistle for each person in the party, to keep track of each other separated in the woods. Flashlight to look into hollow logs. Walking stick to steady yourself in rough, steep, slippery or brushy going. TP. 6-8 foot measuring tape. Pocketknife of course. Pen or pencil and small notebook. Variety of trinkets. Hat to protect face in brush. Amplified remote antenna (mountable on walking stick) for wooded poor signal areas. Rain jacket? Litter bag. Wading shoes, for those diaboliocal caches that may need them. I carry in a fanny pack. I use a small backpack when I'm carrying in an ammo-can to place.

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After looking at this thread, I didn't see a few spare Ziploc bags. After a cache I found today, I will now start to carry a few spare Ziploc bags in my kit and a few paper towels. The inside of the cache was wet even though the lid was sealed. I did the best I could to dry it out but was not able to replace the Ziploc.

 

I will be better prepared in the future. I guess we learn as we go... icon_razz.gif

 

Zahrim....

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After looking at this thread, I didn't see a few spare Ziploc bags. After a cache I found today, I will now start to carry a few spare Ziploc bags in my kit and a few paper towels. The inside of the cache was wet even though the lid was sealed. I did the best I could to dry it out but was not able to replace the Ziploc.

 

I will be better prepared in the future. I guess we learn as we go... icon_razz.gif

 

Zahrim....

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This has already been hashed out I'm sure, but I just HAD to post a reply.

 

Here's what dasein carries in our backpack:

compass, extra sets of GPS batteries, GPS owner's manual, flashlight and extra batteries, small binoculars, 2 FRS radios and spare batteries, a pair of heavy-duty leather gloves for each of us, kitchen trash bags, bug spray, sunscreen, a hat for each of us, 50 feet of good rope, traveler's toilet tissue, small first aid kit, small container w/ Aleve and Tylenol, some wetwipes, emergency blanket (the silver ones), leatherman tool, a few little golf pencils, cache goodies to trade. My husband also carries his cellular phone on his person. Even if you are caching in the middle of nowhere, if there is an emergency, you might be able to get a signal to get through to someone/911.

 

We use a Columbia Sportswear backpack that is yellow (for visibility) and has reflective material on it. It has 3 seperate zipping compartments. One compartment we use for the first-aid/personal hygiene stuff, another for electronics/flashlight/binoculars/batteries, and the 3rd compartment for cache goodies, hats, gloves, and rope. This way we quickly know where to look for what.

 

We can't emphasize enough the need for a quality backpack. The first one we bought fit all our needs but it was a brand we never heard of and on clearance at our local Fred Meyer store. By the time it was 2 weeks old, the straps were tearing away from the body of the bacpack, so then we decided we should have sprung for quality in the first place.

 

Our backpack has a mesh pocket on each outer side, and we put a liter bottle of water in each pocket when we go out caching, no matter how near the cache might be to where we park. Sometimes when a cache is .25 mile away as-the-crow-flies, it can really be a much further walk, as I'm sure we've all found out. You don't want to get dehydrated while hiking or get heat stroke, or get lost for a time without water! Water is essential for life. We can live much longer without food than water. However, if we go on a very strenuous or longer caching hike, we're sure to take some Power Bars, trail mix and/or an MRE for each of us. We carry all the stuff above, and there is still plenty of left-over room. However, the lighter, the better.

 

Taking the GPS is a given, as are cache print-outs. We also keep detailed topographic maps of both Oregon and Washington in our vehicle, and any special gear that a particular cache may require. For instance, if you read ahead of time that previous finders had to wade through water, you'd take along an old pair of shoes and clean socks or rubber boots. Common sense, huh?

 

If a terrain rating is over 2 stars, we have learned to carry our walking sticks for hiking assistance. Different caches each at 2 stars may be totally different difficulties. However, you may want to always take your walking stick along to clear spider webs or look in brush.

 

Well, I think that's finally it; isn't that enough? Yeah, I agree!

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Its an acquired taste, but my roommate and I take it on caching trips a lot. Helps when a terrain rating of one turns out to be a three or four. Quick energy, etc. Just make sure to drink water with it icon_biggrin.gif It can be a bit costly, $1.29 per pack retail, I've been pricing around websites and found cases of it for as little as 95 cents per pack.

 

snazzsig.jpg

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Its an acquired taste, but my roommate and I take it on caching trips a lot. Helps when a terrain rating of one turns out to be a three or four. Quick energy, etc. Just make sure to drink water with it icon_biggrin.gif It can be a bit costly, $1.29 per pack retail, I've been pricing around websites and found cases of it for as little as 95 cents per pack.

 

snazzsig.jpg

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quote:
Originally posted by Anders:

I don't even carry a backpack, let alone all the paraphernalia of western warfare - excuse me, geocaching - that several of you seem to consider absolutely necessary.


 

I do not own, and have never owned, a handgun. However I am considering it, and it was a geocaching experience that changed my mind.

 

A couple of months ago, I was on a solo cache trip along the Utah/Idaho border. There was nobody around for miles. I started my hike, when I came across a severed deer leg. Great, I thought, the work of some dumb-@$$ poacher. Dang gun nuts! icon_mad.gif

 

But then I bent down to examine it a bit closer. It was not the work of poachers, but appeared to be the work of a large cat. It's amazing how quickly a short, easy quarter-mile path through the woods can turn from a pleasant journey into a several minutes of absolute terror.

 

Now, I do, in fact, know that cats tend to stay away from humans. I know that standing my ground and acting aggressive should cover most situations. I know that cat attacks are generally against people who are running away. But the small chance that I might be a kitty treat for some cougar has really made me think.

 

I am not a hunter--I don't believe it's necessary or morally justifiable for most Americans. And I certainly don't ever want to be in a position to feel like I have to kill a wild animal for any reason. But still, I will probably acquire a handgun and learn to use it safely against the chance of that happening again.

 

++cardobj

 

++cardobj

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quote:
Originally posted by Anders:

I don't even carry a backpack, let alone all the paraphernalia of western warfare - excuse me, geocaching - that several of you seem to consider absolutely necessary.


 

I do not own, and have never owned, a handgun. However I am considering it, and it was a geocaching experience that changed my mind.

 

A couple of months ago, I was on a solo cache trip along the Utah/Idaho border. There was nobody around for miles. I started my hike, when I came across a severed deer leg. Great, I thought, the work of some dumb-@$$ poacher. Dang gun nuts! icon_mad.gif

 

But then I bent down to examine it a bit closer. It was not the work of poachers, but appeared to be the work of a large cat. It's amazing how quickly a short, easy quarter-mile path through the woods can turn from a pleasant journey into a several minutes of absolute terror.

 

Now, I do, in fact, know that cats tend to stay away from humans. I know that standing my ground and acting aggressive should cover most situations. I know that cat attacks are generally against people who are running away. But the small chance that I might be a kitty treat for some cougar has really made me think.

 

I am not a hunter--I don't believe it's necessary or morally justifiable for most Americans. And I certainly don't ever want to be in a position to feel like I have to kill a wild animal for any reason. But still, I will probably acquire a handgun and learn to use it safely against the chance of that happening again.

 

++cardobj

 

++cardobj

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A guy was attacked on Vancouver Island by a Cougar a few weeks ago. He managed to grab into his pocket and get his pocket knife out, heaven only knows how he managed to open the thing, and stab it a few times. When it got startled he slit its throat. The guy is VERY badly injured and is really lucky to be alive. Also, living in this part of the world I've heard of various grizzly (is that the black or brown?) bear attacks. I'd hate to come up against any wildlife when out hiking!

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Just remember what ever you put in your backpack, some one has to carry it!.... The longer the trek, the heavier the pack will get!

 

pssst.. Good pads on shoulder straps help. icon_smile.gif

 

Dale

 

I'm Diagonally Parked In A Parallel Universe.

 

[This message was edited by Dale_Lynn on August 22, 2002 at 09:57 AM.]

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Just remember what ever you put in your backpack, some one has to carry it!.... The longer the trek, the heavier the pack will get!

 

pssst.. Good pads on shoulder straps help. icon_smile.gif

 

Dale

 

I'm Diagonally Parked In A Parallel Universe.

 

[This message was edited by Dale_Lynn on August 22, 2002 at 09:57 AM.]

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As far as firestarters go for your packs, if the worst does happen, I would suggest a ziplock bag stuffed with dryer lint (it lights real easy), and the keep the flame going long enough for your wood to catch fire, some Vaseline Balls.

 

Vaseline Balls - place 5-10 cottonballs into a ziplock bag with 2-3 tbls petroleum jelly, seal bag and massage/squish the mess until the cotton balls are loaded with the vaseline. You can vary the quantities as you see fit to get the right mix, so little loose vaseline is left in the bag. Put one or two of these in your firepit prior to attempting to start and you'll be very impressed at the duration of flame they produce.

 

Both are very lightweight and compact to carry.

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I usually have to carry my 15mo old in a kelty child carrier backpack, then I only pack a snack for her and my 3 year old (who hikes next to me!but I do end up carrying her through the thorny off trail portions of the hunt) and some water/juice. I do always forget to bring bug spray though, which I quickly remember in the middle of the woods icon_confused.gif after the first few bits, luckly the kids stay bug free for some reason! Its always good to pack for an unexpected overnight, But when backpacking I go ultralight, or close to it, going crazy and packing the kitchen sink just give you back problems. Keep it simple and enjoy the view. icon_smile.gif

 

[This message was edited by JBird77 on September 04, 2002 at 08:54 AM.]

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I usually have to carry my 15mo old in a kelty child carrier backpack, then I only pack a snack for her and my 3 year old (who hikes next to me!but I do end up carrying her through the thorny off trail portions of the hunt) and some water/juice. I do always forget to bring bug spray though, which I quickly remember in the middle of the woods icon_confused.gif after the first few bits, luckly the kids stay bug free for some reason! Its always good to pack for an unexpected overnight, But when backpacking I go ultralight, or close to it, going crazy and packing the kitchen sink just give you back problems. Keep it simple and enjoy the view. icon_smile.gif

 

[This message was edited by JBird77 on September 04, 2002 at 08:54 AM.]

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Great, I've been reading these posts and adding a few items to my backpack.

Tweezers, aspirin, nylon cord and chapstick.

Got to look into an Emergency First Aid class.

 

I also would add...

Women's Compact mirror for removing dirt and bugs from eyes, good for signaling too.

Bausch and Lomb "Moisture Eyes" single use dispensers.

Moleskin

 

Favorite Solo hiking/geocaching gear for more demanding conditions.

 

Ultimate Dimension torso pack (form fitting runners back pack).

Leki Super Makalu trek poles (cambered handgrip angle makes a BIG difference).

OR Windstopper Gortex Cap and high zip-neck windbreaker (heat retention for sudden weather changes).

 

NIGHT GEAR

Petzl Duo, LED/halogen headlamp (bullet proof handsfree LED for walking and halogen for spotting).

Eternalight Xray LED flashight (can be adjusted down for long usable burn time, strobe signal. A small 1-2 year "pilot light" can be activated so it's always visible at night).

Photon 2 (tiny single LED on keychain, has locking ON switch).

 

Modern LED lights offer a revolutionary, broad, usable illumination, great for walking. The bulbs don't burn out either and the light dims very gradually as the battery runs out. See Candlepower forums.

----------

Greenjeens

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I haven't seen it mentioned yet but we carry a bottle of Tecnu. It's a poison Oak/Ivy cleanser. After the kids and I get through with a cache near poison oak, we squeeze this stuff on our hands and forearms and scrub, then rinse off to reduce the chances of a poison oak rash. It does require water to rinse off, but it's worth it. In the San Francisco Bay area, there's a lot of Poison Oak in the hills.

I also carry a bunch of zip-lock bags, gallon and quart, the heavy freezer kind. They weigh almost nothing and their uses are many. Keep the Tecnu in it's own bag in case it leaks.

Mickey

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hey I've got 908 too...

anyhow, a gun is also capable of emitting a loud enough sharp enough noise to scare off predator cats, wolves, coyotes... etc as well as most humans who would otherwise wish you bodily harm.

they know that noise, and what it means from years of human hunting.

 

im not advocating or encouraging anything, just stating a point of view.

 

-----

If it ain't broke, I can *fix* that...

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I now have a new appreciation for "being prepared". Duct tape on my "what to take" list doesn't seem so far-fetched.

 

My wife and and I just returned from some local caches. For local caches we usually take just a fanny pack with two water bottle holders on it and a couple of zippered pockets, so we don't take a whole lot of stuff with us. After all, it's just a short, local cache icon_smile.gif

 

At the second cache, the summit of a small hill, the toe on the right boot came completely separated from the upper. This was no doubt the result of several days of geocaching in Kauai and Maui where we found 11 geocaches, many on very muddy, very wet trails. As we started back down I caught the loose sole on a rock and the entire sole separated from the upper! icon_eek.gif Remember, this was just a short, local suburban cache, less than a mile, but we had ascended to a height of over 1100 feet. Luckily, I had my small, pocket-size First Aid kit with me and it had a decent size roll of adhesive tape. I bound the sole back on with the adhesive tape and made it down OK, but I'm sure glad that I didn't have to walk 3/4 mile down a steep, rocky trail with just a stockinged foot!

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I now have a new appreciation for "being prepared". Duct tape on my "what to take" list doesn't seem so far-fetched.

 

My wife and and I just returned from some local caches. For local caches we usually take just a fanny pack with two water bottle holders on it and a couple of zippered pockets, so we don't take a whole lot of stuff with us. After all, it's just a short, local cache icon_smile.gif

 

At the second cache, the summit of a small hill, the toe on the right boot came completely separated from the upper. This was no doubt the result of several days of geocaching in Kauai and Maui where we found 11 geocaches, many on very muddy, very wet trails. As we started back down I caught the loose sole on a rock and the entire sole separated from the upper! icon_eek.gif Remember, this was just a short, local suburban cache, less than a mile, but we had ascended to a height of over 1100 feet. Luckily, I had my small, pocket-size First Aid kit with me and it had a decent size roll of adhesive tape. I bound the sole back on with the adhesive tape and made it down OK, but I'm sure glad that I didn't have to walk 3/4 mile down a steep, rocky trail with just a stockinged foot!

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quote:
Originally posted by Tdelta:

This is a test


 

Just for future reference, there are usually a few threads with the subject title "test" that people use to test avatars and signatures and stuff. It just helps to keep em all in one place without cluttering up the forums too much.

 

toe.gif

Click the Toe...  and please stop confusing your opinion with fact, ok?
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quote:
Originally posted by TeeEff:

Duct tape on my "what to take" list doesn't seem so far-fetched.


 

And here's an easy way to carry it. It was in a early thread by another cacher. I've done it and it works great.

 

Take an old credit card (phone card, etc.) and wrap the duct tape around it lengthwise. They are about the same width. By doing this you can take several yards of duct tape in a very small package.

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I carry the following items.

 

laminated folding topo map of the area i am in

first aid kit with 2 snake bite suction pens

epi pen for bee, wasp, yellow jacket stings

25 mg benydryl and benydryl poison ivy cream

glucose tabs being i'm diabetic & my meds for it

trail mix of assorted nuts

home made beef jerky

packpacking water purify pump & bottle

water proof matches, bic lighter & mini butane torch

cylume sticks, clear, yellow, red, green

spare batteries

NOAA weather alert radio (very small)

cell phone

12 gauge flare sticks (buy them at marine shops) use your own judgement in dry areas on the above

my H2O camleback inside my pack

gloves

mini mag light

extra socks cushion sole OD green hehehe

and my walking stick just in case i run into a snake and good for pushin briars away

2 MRE pouches with heaters

laminated emergency info with phone numbers

poncho & space blanket

lenstatic compass

signal mirror

my Buckmaster survival knife with fishing items

geocaching trade items

pen/pencil/small water proof log book

cheap digital pen cam

small zippy baggies

and depending on where i am geocaching and how far into the woods i carry my 45 auto w/spare mag

(licenced to carry of course)

Safety orange vest just incase there are hunters around

 

Yeah and after all this with my fanny pack it's a whoppin 30 pounds. And always waypoint your starting spot or vehicle

 

Chance favors the prepaired mind << Just thought i would throw that in icon_biggrin.gif

 

And if it's just a small easy cache where i can see my truck i just leave my pack in the truck.

 

[This message was edited by stlthy1 on September 23, 2002 at 08:05 PM.]

 

[This message was edited by stlthy1 on September 23, 2002 at 08:10 PM.]

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I carry the following items.

 

laminated folding topo map of the area i am in

first aid kit with 2 snake bite suction pens

epi pen for bee, wasp, yellow jacket stings

25 mg benydryl and benydryl poison ivy cream

glucose tabs being i'm diabetic & my meds for it

trail mix of assorted nuts

home made beef jerky

packpacking water purify pump & bottle

water proof matches, bic lighter & mini butane torch

cylume sticks, clear, yellow, red, green

spare batteries

NOAA weather alert radio (very small)

cell phone

12 gauge flare sticks (buy them at marine shops) use your own judgement in dry areas on the above

my H2O camleback inside my pack

gloves

mini mag light

extra socks cushion sole OD green hehehe

and my walking stick just in case i run into a snake and good for pushin briars away

2 MRE pouches with heaters

laminated emergency info with phone numbers

poncho & space blanket

lenstatic compass

signal mirror

my Buckmaster survival knife with fishing items

geocaching trade items

pen/pencil/small water proof log book

cheap digital pen cam

small zippy baggies

and depending on where i am geocaching and how far into the woods i carry my 45 auto w/spare mag

(licenced to carry of course)

Safety orange vest just incase there are hunters around

 

Yeah and after all this with my fanny pack it's a whoppin 30 pounds. And always waypoint your starting spot or vehicle

 

Chance favors the prepaired mind << Just thought i would throw that in icon_biggrin.gif

 

And if it's just a small easy cache where i can see my truck i just leave my pack in the truck.

 

[This message was edited by stlthy1 on September 23, 2002 at 08:05 PM.]

 

[This message was edited by stlthy1 on September 23, 2002 at 08:10 PM.]

Link to comment

Yeah, a buddy is probably the best thing to have...

 

We don't carry much because civilization, or the truck, has always been fairly close, so far.

 

In the truck we have a first aid kit, spare shoes and socks, rain gear, maps and printouts, cooler full of food and drinks.

 

We generally only take:

- map and printout of the caches we're after.

- GPS and compass.

- water

- FRS radios. Sometimes we're seperated for whatever reason and these are good so we don't have to holler.

- cache goodies, logbook, stamp and pad.

- cache repair items: ziplock bags, various types tape, stapler, spare logbook, and sheets for micro logbooks.

- spare batteries

- toilet paper & paper towels

- bug spray <- especially around here!

- a few baby wipes

 

CR

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OK, I take the same stuff everyone else does, but I have a question that relates to this topic. When I leave for geocaching everything is neat in my backpack and I look like a good little girlscout but by the time I get home, the inside of my pick up cab looks like a tornado hit it. Things everywhere. I must be the messiest cacher alive. I'm surprised everything doesn't fall out when i open the door at the gas station. Am I the only one like this? icon_biggrin.gif

 

LIVE FOR TODAY!

Link to comment

OK, I take the same stuff everyone else does, but I have a question that relates to this topic. When I leave for geocaching everything is neat in my backpack and I look like a good little girlscout but by the time I get home, the inside of my pick up cab looks like a tornado hit it. Things everywhere. I must be the messiest cacher alive. I'm surprised everything doesn't fall out when i open the door at the gas station. Am I the only one like this? icon_biggrin.gif

 

LIVE FOR TODAY!

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